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On April 21, a visit was received from the Ladies' Committee. Mrs. Governor Andrew, Mrs. W. B. Rogers, Mrs. E. D. Cheney, Mrs. C. M. Severance, Miss Abby W. May, Judge Russell, Rev. Mr. Grimes, Charles W. Slack, and J. H. Stevenson were of the party. Another event was the review by Governor Andrew and Secretary Chase in the afternoon of April 30, the President's Fast Day. The line was formed with eight hundred and fifty men; and the distinguished visitors were received with due honors. Dr. Howe, Robert Dale Owen, Mr. Garrison, and other gentlemen were also present. On April 30, the regiment drew nine hundred and fifty Enfield rifled muskets and a suitable number of noncommissioned officers' swords. Lieutenant Jewett, appointed ordnance officer, issued the arms on the following day. May 2, the regiment was drilled for the first time in the School of the Battalion. General Peirce, accompanied by Surgeon-General Dale and the Governor's Council, reviewed the Fifty-fourth on May 4
r, General, steamer, 234, 237, 262. Hooker, R. W., 15. Hooper, H. N., 132, 144,153, 164, 168, 179, 180, 191, 193, 196, 202, 203, 204, 205, 227, 233, 234, 237, 238, 239, 245, 246, 248, 249, 265, 272, 286, 288, 291, 296, 297, 298, 299, 301, 302, 303, 304, 309, 310, 311, 316. Houghton, Charles, steamer, 286. Housatonic, gunboat, 187. Howard, Oliver O., 267. Howard plantation, 263. Howard, Willard, 34, 55, 91, 105, 133,135, 163, 164, 182, 202, 233, 237,248, 276, 291, 314, 317. Howe, Samuel G., 23. Howell, J. B., 158. Howland, Cornelius, 10, 11. Hoyt, Henry M., 196, 206, 216. Huguenin, T. A., 123, 218. Hunter, Alexander, 119. Hunter, David, 31, 36, 39, 43, 44, 46. Hunter, David, letter to John A. Andrew, 36. Hunter, General, steamer, 65, 66, 67, 150, 151, 152, 184. Hurlbut, George P., 236. Huron, gunboat, 60. Huts, The, S. C., 212. Hutson plantation, 263. I. I Company, 20, 38, 54, 75, 92, 145, 148, 150, 164, 188, 191, 198, 207, 234, 237, 245, 254, 26
General Butler, and cannot be communicated with. Dr. Howe has not arrived. The Cambridge arrived yesterday rt Monroe to bring on some heavy guns and shells. Dr. Howe arrived this morning, having been detained on the action and communication with the authorities. Dr. Howe prefers he should go on with the business, as he u can to forward the sale of the vessel; and he and Dr. Howe will advise with Mr. Lowell. Faithfully your Exrnor Andrew addressed the following letter to Dr. Samuel G. Howe:— Executive Department, Boston, May 2, 1861. To Dr. Samuel G. Howe, Boston. my dear Sir,—The Massachusetts Volunteer Militia now in the field demandiend and servant, John A. Andrew, Governor. Dr. Howe immediately entered upon his duties. Upon his retof humor and sarcasm running through the report of Dr. Howe, such as might have been expected from a gentleman on the field. A brave and generous gentleman! Dr. Howe's report is too long to quote entire. It contains
common spirit, to effect a result which was creditable to Massachusetts. Yours faithfully and respectfully, John A. Andrew, To Dr. G. H. Lyman. At the beginning of the war, a memorial was addressed to the Governor, signed by Drs. James Jackson, George Hayward, and S. D. Townsend, asking that none but well-qualified and competent surgeons should receive medical appointments. The memorial was favorably regarded by the Governor; and he appointed Drs. Hayward, Townsend, John Ware, Samuel G. Howe, J. Mason Warren, S. Cabot, Jr., R. M. Hodges, George H. Lyman, and William J. Dale, as a medical commission. Drs. George H. Gay, Samuel L. Abbott, John C. Dalton, and R. W. Hooper were subsequently appointed to fill vacancies caused by death or resignation. This board was charged with the responsibility of examining candidates for the medical staff, and also acted as a board of consultation in sanitary matters, when called upon by the Surgeon-General. Their valuable services were in
the North-eastern branch of the United-States Sanitary Commission. It was organized in December, 1861, with headquarters in Boston, and continued its work until July 12, 1865. At that time, finding $6,462.14 in its treasury after its debts were paid, it resolved itself into a small committee to expend the residue of the money for the benefit of disabled soldiers, or women and children left by the war without their natural protectors. Its first officers were, John Ware, M. D., president; S. G. Howe, M. D., vice-president: Rev. Rufus Ellis, secretary; and George Higginson, Esq., treasurer. It had an executive committee of seven ladies, the chairman of which was the acting head of the work; an industrial committee of six ladies, whose duty consisted in purchasing material, and getting it converted into garments. The cutting was done by volunteers, and the sewing by poor women, fairly paid for their work by persons of wealth, ready to do the twofold good of employing the poor, and fur
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
o the Mexican war Winthrop's Subterfuges Winthrop's Subserviency to Slave power final appeal to Winthrop advocacy of Dr. Howe's election instantly cease wrong-doing friends of America in Parliament Liberty defended in Parliament Fox--Barre--B846—on the eve of the Congressional Election, at a meeting in the Tremont Temple to advance the cause of the Election of Dr. Howe in opposition to Mr. Winthrop, the regular Whig candidate, Mr. Sumner made one of his most effective speeches, in which u will be needed. Our fellow-citizen heeded him not, but continued by his side, sharing his perils. That Bostonian was Dr. Howe. And now the words of Lafayette are verified. He is needed by his country. At the present crisis, in our Revolution oency; nay, more, if we undertake to try the candidates on the present occasion by this standard, we shall find, that, as Dr. Howe is unquestionably right, so Mr. Winthrop is too certainly wrong. In thus exalting our own candidate, I would not unduly
Viii. Ten days later—Nov. 4, 1846—on the eve of the Congressional Election, at a meeting in the Tremont Temple to advance the cause of the Election of Dr. Howe in opposition to Mr. Winthrop, the regular Whig candidate, Mr. Sumner made one of his most effective speeches, in which he said: When in the month of July, 1830, te yourself for your own country, where you will be needed. Our fellow-citizen heeded him not, but continued by his side, sharing his perils. That Bostonian was Dr. Howe. And now the words of Lafayette are verified. He is needed by his country. At the present crisis, in our Revolution of Three Days, he comes forward to the posn. If we apply this to the existing exigency; nay, more, if we undertake to try the candidates on the present occasion by this standard, we shall find, that, as Dr. Howe is unquestionably right, so Mr. Winthrop is too certainly wrong. In thus exalting our own candidate, I would not unduly disparage another. It is for the sake o
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
Sunderland had recited the Lord's Prayer, a choir of forty gentlemen from the Apollo Club sang that inimitable ode of Horace, Integer vitoe. While this solemn music was rising, two ladies, the only mourners of their sex within the enclosure, stepped forward and placed upon the coffin, already laden with floral tributes of rarest beauty, an exquisite wreath, and a cross. A request was received from Mrs. Hastings, Mr. Sumner's sister in San Francisco, asking Miss Maud Howe, daughter of Dr. S. G. Howe, to have prepared for her a wreath and cross, the description of which was fully given, which she wished to have placed on the Senator's coffin previously to burial. The order was tenderly executed at the grave in Mount Auburn. Rev. Henry W. Foote pronounced the words, I heard a voice from Heaven saying unto me, Write:— From henceforth blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for so saith the Spirit. They have rested from their labors, and their works do follow them. And as the d
Sunderland had recited the Lord's Prayer, a choir of forty gentlemen from the Apollo Club sang that inimitable ode of Horace, Integer vitoe. While this solemn music was rising, two ladies, the only mourners of their sex within the enclosure, stepped forward and placed upon the coffin, already laden with floral tributes of rarest beauty, an exquisite wreath, and a cross. A request was received from Mrs. Hastings, Mr. Sumner's sister in San Francisco, asking Miss Maud Howe, daughter of Dr. S. G. Howe, to have prepared for her a wreath and cross, the description of which was fully given, which she wished to have placed on the Senator's coffin previously to burial. The order was tenderly executed at the grave in Mount Auburn. Rev. Henry W. Foote pronounced the words, I heard a voice from Heaven saying unto me, Write:— From henceforth blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for so saith the Spirit. They have rested from their labors, and their works do follow them. And as the d
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Twelfth: his character and fame. (search)
er trial before the Senate, on articles of impeachment presented by the Senator from Wisconsin (Mr. Howe), I forbore taking any part in the debate, even in reply to allegations, asserted to be of decictance I am aided by Senators who are determined to make me speak. The Senator from Wisconsin (Mr. Howe), who appears as prosecuting officer, after alleging these personal relations as the gravamen ohese exerted a peculiar influence and did honor to our country. To this list I proposed to add Dr. Howe of Greece, believing that he, too, would do honor to our country, and also Mr. Motley in Londonbenefit of the museum. 5. I bequeath to my friends of many years, Henry W. Longfellow and Samuel G. Howe, my bronzes, to be divided between them; also to Henry W. Longfellow the Psyche and that bus9. 6. I bequeath to the daughters of Henry W. Longfellow $2,000, also to the daughters of Samuel G. Howe $2,000, and to the daughters of James T. Furniss of Philadelphia $2,000, which I ask them to
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