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omen in an emergency execute their designs, it was done. He slept in a wrapper — a loose one. It was yet around him. This she fastened, ere he was aware of it, and then, bidding him adieu, urged him to go to the spring, a short distance off, where his horses and arms were. Strange as it may seem, there was not even a pistol in the tent. Davis felt that his only course was to reach his horse and arms, and complied. As he was leaving the door, followed by a servant with a water-bucket, Miss Howell flung a shawl over his head. There was no time to remove it without exposure and embarrassment; and, as he had not far to go, he ran the chance exactly as it was devised for him. In these two articles, consisted the woman's attire of which so much nonsense has been spoken and written; and, under these circumstances and in this way was Jefferson Davis going forth to perfect his escape. No bonnet, no gown, no petticoats, no crinoline — nothing of all these. And what there was, happened to
t galling fire. I annex a report of the casualties of the day, showing the total loss of my brigade. In conclusion I would say that, so far as I am at present informed, my officers, commissioned and non-commissioned, nobly performed their duties; and it might, therefore, be invidious to particularize. Still, in justice to the gallant dead, who have devoted their lives to their country, I must record the names of Capt. Brewster, of the First, and Capt. Buckley, of the Third; also, Second Lieut. Howell, of the Third, all officers of distinguished merit. These officers fought under my eye. As regards the conduct of the Second and Fourth regiments' officers, I am told that it was all that could be desired. But these regiments having been taken from me, I did not see them during the action. It is eminently due to my staff-officers to say that they carried out my orders intelligently and promptly, and did not hesitate, and were often exposed to the hottest fire of the day. I w
guns. He deserves promotion to a battery. Capt. Chas. E. Clark, Acting Lieutenant-Colonel, Sixth Michigan regiment, prevented the enemy from flanking our right, bringing his command at the critical moment to the support of Nim's battery. Lieut. Howell, company F, Sixth Michigan, and Lieut. A. T. Ralph, Acting Adjutant, for intrepidity. Capt. Spitzer, Sixth Michigan, in command of the company of pickets, who handsomely held in check the enemy's advance. The fearless conduct of Lieut. HoweLieut. Howell, company F, and Sergt. Thayer, company A, Sixth Michigan regiment, after they were wounded, in supporting Lieut. Brown's battery. Captain Soule and Lieut. Fassett, company I, Sixth Michigan, as skirmishers, were wounded, deserve especial notice for the steadiness of their command, which lost heavily in killed and wounded. Major Bickmore and Adjutant J. H. Metcalfe, of the Fourteenth Maine, wounded while nobly discharging their duty. Capt. French, company K, Fourteenth Maine, who was wou
women in an emergency execute their designs, it was done. He slept in a wrapper — a loose one. It was yet around him. This she fastened ere he was aware of it, and then, bidding him adieu, urged him to go to the spring, a short distance off, where his horses and arms were. Strange as it may seem, there was not even a pistol in the tent. Davis felt that his only course was to reach his horse and arms, and complied. As he was leaving the door, followed by a servant with a water-bucket, Miss Howell flung a shawl over his head. There was no time to remove it without exposure and embarrassment, and as he had not far to go, he ran the chance exactly as it was devised for him. In these two articles consisted the woman's attire of which so much nonsense has been spoken and written, and under these circumstances, and in this way, was Jefferson Davis going forth to perfect his escape. But it was too late for any effort to reach his horses, and the Confederate President was at last a p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2.9 (search)
gambling and noise after ten o'clock, and many of the leading gamblers have approved the idea. Colonel Wm. J. Clark, Twenty-fourth North Carolina troops, has been elected chief of the division, and made a short speech, announcing that, by vote, it was agreed that all lights should be put out and quiet observed after the usual nine o'clock prayers. My friends Arrington and Browne aided me actively in canvassing in favor of this excellent change. Colonel Clark is an old army officer. Midshipman Howell, a relative of Mr. Davis, is an inmate of 28. Lieutenant E. H. Crawley, Twenty-sixth Georgia; Captain J. H. Field, Eighth Georgia; Lieutenant Q. D. Finley, Eighteenth Mississippi, and Adjutant Alex. S. Webb, of Forty-fourth North Carolina troops, are among the inmates also. The newspaper accounts of Sherman's march from Georgia through South Carolina are heartrending. An extract from one of them says: Sherman burnt Columbia on the seventeenth instant. He had burnt six out of seven
by obtaining it from a higher power, my preference as to the route was accorded. I told him that some of the men with me were on parole, and that they all were riding their own horses—private property—that I would be glad if they should be permitted to retain them, and I have a distinct recollection that he promised me it should be done; I have since learned that they were all deprived of their horses, and some who were on parole, viz., Major Moran, Captain Moody, Lieutenant Hathaway, Midshipman Howell, and Private Messec, who had not violated their obligations of parole, but had been captured because they were found voluntarily traveling with my family to protect them from marauders, were sent with me as prisoners of war, and all incarcerated, in disregard of the protection promised when they surrendered. At Augusta we were put on a steamer, and there met Vice-President Stephens, Hon. C. C. Clay (who had voluntarily surrendered himself upon learning that he was included in the pro
, 124, 133. Holt, Joseph, 418, 420. Hood, General J. B., 79, 99, 102, 131, 270, 272, 273, 281-82, 296, 309, 359,360, 361, 372, 466, 468, 473, 475, 478, 480, 481,482, 534, 551. Account of battle of Sharpsburg, Pa., 284-85. Appointment to succeed Gen. J. E. Johnston, 472. Evacuation of Atlanta, 476. Campaign into Tennessee, 482-83, 485-91. Hooker, General, Joseph, 79, 284, 285, 286, 300, 303, 306, 307, 308, 309, 364, 365, 366, 367, 370, 371, 373. Howard, General O. O., 92, 365. Howell, Midshipman, 596-97. Huger, General, 70, 75, 82, 83, 102, 103, 104, 105, 111, 119, 120, 121-22, 124, 125, 126, 127, 130, 132, 133, 170. Lt. Thomas B., 186. Huggins, Thomas, 200. Humphreys, Benjamin G., 635, 637. Hunter, Major, 350-51. General David, 153, 445, 446, 447, 496, 500. Arming of slaves, 499. General Early's description of his retreat down the Shenandoah, 601. R. M. T., member of Confederate peace commission, 521. Report of peace commission to Davis, 522-23. Hunton, General, 42
its edge. A current of water may flow through the apparatus. L is a Whelpley and Storer's mill. It has a series of beaters m m which revolve in a casing and dash to pieces the blocks of copper ore which are placed in the hopper o and fed by the corrugated roller. A suction draft from the fan n removes the stuff when it is beaten into dust. M has a wheel with hammers revolving a case with interior corrugations. A fan on the disk face of the wheel drives out the powdered ore. N is Howell and Hannay's machine for crushing quartz, bones, etc., by the percussive force of the rotating projector or by the impingement of the material against the inside of the case. O is a form of the Blake crusher, in which the lower end of the moving jaw rests against the anti-friction roller, and its upper end receives motion by a cam turning in the rectangular opening. The concave faces of the jaws are thus made to roll together with a slight but powerful movement. See also Fig. 3417. F
, 1860. 27,412PaineMar. 6, 1860. 31,805HicksMar. 26, 1861. 32,517HowellJune 11, 1861. 43,514MackJuly 12, 1864. 43,705PhelpsAug. 2, 1864. 5,715Blake et al.Oct. 11, 1859. 26,207SerrellNov. 22, 1859. 27.805HowellApr. 10, 1860. 28,889MitchellJune 26, 1860. 31,602HowellMar. 5, 18HowellMar. 5, 1861. 31,645MarshMar. 5, 1861. 31,878DownerApr. 2, 1861. 32,035WhitcombApr. 9, 1861. 32,519JenksJune 11, 1861. 32,710PaddockJuly 23, 1861. 92,692BartlesonJuly 20, 1869. 96,180YeutzerOct. 26, 1869. 96,809HowellNov. 16, 1869. 96,901EnlassNov. 16, 1869. 101,147MorehouseMar. 22,. 29, 1873. 138,638Goodrich et al.May 6, 1873. (Reissue.)5,414HowellMay 20, 1873. 141,576McMillanAug. 5, 1873. 141,933CaswellAug. 19, ,129WilcoxMay 21, 1872. 129,998Warren et al.July 30, 1872. 131,614HowellSept. 24, 1872. 133,760Cleveland et al.Dec. 10, 1872. 134,526Duntosion into wrought-iron by puddling, etc. See casting; puddling. Howell's furnace for making malleable iron direct from the ore with stone
d prevents it from burning. One pipe conveys in the water, and another carries away the steam. Where water is abundant, a stream is run continually through it. In Mackenzie and Isbell's cupola-furnace, separate blastcham-bers are arranged in a vertical series around the cupola, receive air by valved branch-pipes from the main, and communicate by distinct rows of tuyeres with the interior. Tuyeres in different positions around the furnace, and at different elevations, are described in Howell's United States patent for making malleable iron direct from the ore. a, negro-head tuyere. b, bull's-eye tuyere. c, duck's-nest tuyere. d are the air-supply pipes for the tuyeres of a hot-blast furnace. They are convoluted, so that the air in its passage through them is longer exposed to the action of the fire, and becomes more thoroughly heated. Forge-tuyeres. Tweed. (Fabric.) A light, twilled woolen fabric for men's wear, with an unfinished surface. Two colors ar
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