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The Daily Dispatch: July 27, 1863., [Electronic resource], Gen. Johnston's movements — his next stand. (search)
Gen. Johnston's movements — his next stand. The Atlanta Appeal has the following intelligence relative to the position of Gen. Johnston's army: Gen Johnston is falling back from Jackson towards Meridian. His position at Brandon was untenaGen. Johnston's army: Gen Johnston is falling back from Jackson towards Meridian. His position at Brandon was untenable on account of the deficiency of water, and in addition it afforded no natural advantages. He will, without doubt, take position on the Chunky river, fifteen miles west of Meridian, which many military men have for some time looked upon as a faGen Johnston is falling back from Jackson towards Meridian. His position at Brandon was untenable on account of the deficiency of water, and in addition it afforded no natural advantages. He will, without doubt, take position on the Chunky river, fifteen miles west of Meridian, which many military men have for some time looked upon as a favorable point. If so, he will be in position to easily defend his front, or if necessary, by means of the railroad facilities in his rear, operate to prevent any raid against the Mobile and Ohio Railroad either north or south of Meridian. Some heir late raid on the river. The Montgomery Mail, of the 21st, says: Brandon, the present headquarters of General Johnston, is in Rankin county, and about fifteen miles east of Jackson. We do not believe that Sherman and Burnside will cr
oach of the gunboats. The DeKalb was blown up and sunk in fifteen feet of water by the explosion of a torpedo. Finding that the enemy were crossing cattle for the rebel army at Natchez, and were said to have several thousand there now, I have sent steamboats and troops to collect them, and to destroy their boats and all means of making more. U. S. Grant, Major-General Commanding. Vicksburg, Miss., July 18th, 12 M., 1863. Major Gen. H. W. Halleck, Gen'l in Chief: Joe. Johnston evacuated Jackson on the night of the 16th. He is now in full retreat east. Most of his army must perish from heat, lack of water, and general discouragement. The rebel army paroled here have to a great extent deserted, and scattered over the country in every direction. Gen. Ransom has gone to Natchez to stop the crossing of cattle for the eastern army. On his arrival he found large numbers had been driven out of the city to be pastured; also, that munitions of war had recently
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1863., [Electronic resource], Gen. Bragg's Fitness for command--Gen. Joe Johnston's opinion. (search)
e troops within the limits of his command, and will repair in person to any part of said command whenever his presence may for the time be necessary or desirable. ****** By command of the Secretary of War. John Withers, A. A. C. His Excellency the President, Richmond, Va. Also, the following extracts from the correspondence between the President and General Johnston, to show that in retaining Gen. Bragg in command of his army he acted in accordance with the judgment of Gen Johnston, in preference to adopting that of gentlemen in civil life, who clamored for his removal: Richmond, Va. Jan. 22, 1862. Gen. J. E. Johnston, Jackson, Miss., and Mobile, Ala: I wish you with the least delay to proceed to the headquarters of Gen. Bragg's army. You will fined explanatory letter at Chattanooga. (Signed) Jeff. Davis. [Extract from copy of letter.] Richmond, Va., Jan. 22, 1863. Gen. J. E. Johnston, Chattanooga, Tenn., As announced in my tel
our horses were worn down, and were unable to draw enough to supply the army. Longstreet, therefore, had to wait awhile, until arrangements were perfected to supply him by railroad. As soon as this was done he made preparations to move forward, hoping soon to recapture Knoxville. Our scouts were already within one mile of that city. Everything was propitious. At this juncture orders came from Richmond, detaching nearly all the cavalry from Longstreet's command and sending them to Gen Johnston.--This was taking from Longstreet what he could not spare in his forward movement. He telegraphed this fact to Richmond, and also said that unless this order was countermanded he would be obliged to fall back. The order was not countermanded. The cavalry left for their new field of operations. Longstreet was compelled to fall back to Greenville. The army is in splendid condition, well clothed and shed, and when they meet the enemy will fight as of yore. The ranks are filling up
John Simon, an Israelite, of the Middle Temple, London, has been created a Sergeant-at-Arms, the first of his religious belief who has ever received this honor in England. Brig Gen Mercer, so long in command of Savannah, has been ordered to report to Gen Johnston at Dalton. His place is to be supplied by Gen John K Jackson. The residence of Hon. Jno. McQueen, Mariboro'district, S, C, was burst on the 17th ult. with all its contents, Including a library of 2,500 volumes. Gen. D. H. Hill.--A correspondent of the Augusta Sentinel says Gen D H Hill is now acting as volunteer aid to Gen Beauregard. Judge Thos. W. Thomas died at Riberton, Ga, on the 24th ult.
ge reported to Gen Smith that the corps of Cadets acted with conspicuous gallantry. Wm H. Richardson, A. G. From Gen Johnston's army. The following intelligence of Gen. Johnston's movements is from our latest Southern exchanges. A dispatchGen. Johnston's movements is from our latest Southern exchanges. A dispatch from Calhoun, Ga., dated the 13th, says: Dalton was evacuated last night by our forces, and occupied this morning about ten o'clock by the enemy. Our forces fell back to Resaca, where the enemy attacked them this evening. Considerable artilsing in front of them at Resaca. The enemy evidently expected a small force at this point, and doubtless hoped to reach Johnston's rear unawares and cut him off. Hooker's corps opened the attack on three divisions of our army at 10 A. M. For th The following letter from Dalton, May 10th, gives an interesting description of the character of the fighting before Gen Johnston's last movement: The investment of the gaps still goes on. There has scarcely been a minute of daylight for three
they can get ready. The detention of the Rappahannock and non arrival of the Alabama here postponed it for a month. This comes direct from rebel officers aboard the vessels, through our spies. Sherman's movements — the Whereabouts of Johnston. A telegram from Nashville, dated the 20th, says: Gen. Sherman is in possession of Kingston, Rome. Cassville and the line of the Etowan. The army had heavy skirmishing with the enemy all the way from Resaca. The railroad and telegraph have been repaired to the present position of the army. The troops are in good condition and spirits. Johnston is believed to be at Atlanta. Five hundred and thirteen prisoners, captured at Resaca arrived here yesterday and to-day. Among them are thirteen officers, belonging to Polk's, Hardee's, and Hood's corps. They will be sent North to morrow. Hugh Trally a native of Ray county, Tenn, was hung to day by order of the military commandant, charged with bush whacking and murder
s report that three Yankee corps have crossed the Etowah on the road to Dallas, and are still crossing. They march in close order, with no straggling, and are ready at any time for a fight. McPherson occupied Dallas Tuesday evening. There was alight skirmishing that afternoon and Wednesday morning with Polk's corps. The Yankees levy heavy contributions an they march, and burn all the mills, factories, and residences. Where the owners have left they destroy everything. [Second Dispatch.] Atlanta, May 26. --The army having advanced from the line of the railroad westward, our information comes more irregular. The firing heard last evening and again to-day is supposed to have been about thirty miles from here, between Marietta and Dallas. The Press reporters have gone to the front. Gov. Brown is here with the State reserve troops. There is a feeling of hopeful confidence among all parties. No communications have been received from Gen Johnston's army to day.
army, but the people may rest assured that they are dictated by wisdom and guided by a master hand. Beyond the "strategic movements," above alluded to, and some skirmishing, nothing of interest occurred on the lines yesterday. From General Johnston's army. The news comes in cheering from Northern Georgia. The enemy were twice hand somely repulsed on Wednesday, and the army is represented to be in fine condition and buoyant with hope. Private accounts from Atlanta state that the p From General Johnston's army. The news comes in cheering from Northern Georgia. The enemy were twice hand somely repulsed on Wednesday, and the army is represented to be in fine condition and buoyant with hope. Private accounts from Atlanta state that the people are hopeful, and confident of the success of our arms. General Forrest, with a sufficient force is operating with General Johnston, and we may expect to hear of more dashing exploits on the part of that heroic cavalry leader.
From Gen Johnston's army. --The following is Gen. Johnston's order to his troops heretofore briefly noticed by telegraph: Head's Army of Tennessee, Cassville, Ga., May 19th, 1864. General Orders. Soldiers of the Army of Tennessee: Gen. Johnston's order to his troops heretofore briefly noticed by telegraph: Head's Army of Tennessee, Cassville, Ga., May 19th, 1864. General Orders. Soldiers of the Army of Tennessee: You have displayed the highest quality of the soldiers.--firmness in combat, patience under tell. By your courage and skill you have repulsed every assault of the enemy. By marches by day and night you have defeated every attempt upon your communur efforts will equal theirs; strengthened by. His support your effort will be crowned with like glories. (Signed) J E Johnston, General. [Official.] (Signed) Kinlech Falcaner, A A G. The Savannah Republican has the following paragraph: The retrograde movements of Gen Johnston have not in the least dispirited the army, and the most implicit confidence is felt in his strategy. All our soldiers express themselves thus: "Old Johnston knows best," On passing his lines a few days
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