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andoned their works in our immediate front, withdrawing to a new, stronger, and more symmetrical line nearer Petersburg. Hours were now spent in making new dispositions to assault this with effect; and, at 3 P. M., an attack was made, first by Martindale, commanding the division left here of Smith's corps; then by Birney, in temporary command of the 2d; and later by the 5th and 9th; but with very heavy loss, and no success, save that Martindale carried the enemy's skirmish-line in his front, anMartindale carried the enemy's skirmish-line in his front, and made a few prisoners. The losses of the enemy, sheltered behind their works, bore, of course, no comparison to ours. It had now been established, at a cost of fully 10,000 men, Between June 10 and 20, Meade's losses were — killed, 1,198; wounded, 6,853; missing, 1,614: total, 9,665. And this does not probably include the losses of Sheridan's cavalry, who were fighting north of the James. that Petersburg could not be carried by direct assault, no matter in what force: and our troops wer
; wounded and taken prisoner, 215; his report and losses, 215. Mansura, La., attack on Banks repulsed at, 531. Marietta, Ga., taken by Sherman, 628. maritime law, in relation to belligerents, 642. Marks's Mill, Ark., Fagan triumphs at, 553. Marmaduke, Gen. M. M., defeated at Springfield, Mo.--repulsed at Hartsville — driven out of Batesville, 447; retreats into Arkansas, 448: defeated at Little Rock. 451; beaten again near Columbia, Ark., 551; captured by Pleasanton, 561. Martindale, Gen. John H., at Gaines's Mill. 156; at Malvern Hill, 165. Martinsburg, Va., occupied by Jackson, 199. Marye's Heights, heroic assaults on, 345. Maryland, Lee's advance into, and proclamation, 193-4. Maryland Heights, held by Ford, 196; prisoners and guns captured at, 202. Mason, J, M., allusion to, 81. Massachusetts volunteers killed in Baltimore, 514. Mathews, Col. Stanley, routs Wheeler, 272. Maury, Gen., defends Mobile, 721; his retreat and losses, 724. Max
ork Williamsburg Hooker's Third 77 1st Wisconsin Chaplin Hills Rousseau's ------ 77 12th U. S. Infantry Gaines' Mill Sykes's Fifth 76 16th Maine Fredericksburg Gibbon's First 76 1st Minnesota Gettysburg Gibbon's Second 75 2d Vermont Wilderness Getty's Sixth 75 21st Illinois Includes loss at Knob Gap.Stone's River Davis's Fourteenth 75 24th Iowa Champion's Hill Hovey's Thirteenth 75 12th Massachusetts Antietam Ricketts's First 74 25th Massachusetts Cold Harbor Martindale's Eighteenth 74 7th Iowa Belmont Grant's ------ 74 9th Iowa Pea Ridge E. A. Carr's ------ 74 18th Illinois Fort Donelson McClernand's ------ 74 35th Massachusetts Antietam Sturgis's Ninth 73 12th New Hampshire This regiment appears again in this same list. Chancellorsville Whipple's Third 72 5th Vermont This regiment appears again in this same list. Savage Station W. F. Smith's Sixth 72 19th Iowa Prairie Grove Herron's ------ 72 9th Ohio Chickamauga Brannan's
cent. Within nine days after breaking camp, it was reduced to 5 officers and 136 men available for action. Next, in percentage of killed in particular engagements, is the Twenty-fifth Massachusetts at Cold Harbor, then in Stannard's Brigade, Martindale's Division, Eighteenth Corps. This loss occurred in the assault on the earthworks at Cold Harbor, where it was subjected to a terrible fire. A Confederate officer, describing the advance of the Twenty-fifth against his works, writes that the 15th Massachusetts Gettysburg Gibbon's 239 38 15+ 18th Massachusetts Manassas Morell's 421 54 12+ 19th Massachusetts Gettysburg Gibbon's 141 17 12+ 20th Massachusetts Fredericksburg Howard's 238 48 20+ 25th Massachusetts Cold Harbor Martindale's 310 74 23+ 57th Massachusetts Wilderness Stevenson's 545 94 17+ 9th Massachusetts Bat'y Gettysburg Reserve Artillery 104 11 10+ 5th Michigan (Cavalry) Hawes' Shop Torbert's 150 15 10+ 6th Michigan (Cavalry) Hawes' Shop Torbert's 1
n nothing but failures, General Grant ordered the greater part of his forces to the support of the Army of the Potomac. Accordingly, on the 29th of May, General W. F. Smith, commanding the Eighteenth Corps, took the First (Brooks') and Second (Martindale's) Divisions of his own corps, and the Second (Devens') and Third Divisions (Ames' Divisions) of the Tenth Corps, and proceeded to Cold Harbor, where these divisions cooperated with the Army of the Potomac in the terrible fighting which commencnd, and in its place, two divisions of the Tenth Corps, under General Devens, temporarily attached to the Eighteenth as a third division, moved with General Smith's command, the three divisions being commanded at Cold Harbor by Generals Brooks, Martindale and Devens. In that battle the Eighteenth Corps made a gallant attack on the enemy's intrenchments; but, like the various other corps engaged, it was obliged to abandon the assault with heavy loss, its casualties at Cold Harbor amounted to 448
ts drill and discipline until March, 1862, when it commenced active service in the Peninsular Army. It served there in Martindale's (1st) Brigade, Morell's (1st) Division, Fitz John Porter's Corps. It was engaged in Porter's great battle at Gaines'th Butler's Army, and hard fighting, with its consequent heavy losses, immediately ensued. At Cold Harbor it fought in Martindale's Division; Colonel McConihe was killed in that battle. The One Hundred and Sixty-ninth held a perilous position in th captured; Colonel White and 64 men were taken prisoners. At Cold Harbor the Fifty-fifth fought in Stannard's Brigade, Martindale's Division, Eighteenth Corps, sustaining a loss of 12 killed, 110 wounded, and 29 missing. In the assault on Petersburgs, who distinguished themselves in action by their coolness and efficient markmanship. First Michigan Infantry. Martindale's Brigade — Morell's Division--Fifth Corps. (1) Col. John C. Robinson, R. A.; Bvt. Major-Gen. U. S. A. (4) Col. Ir<
ghteenth 28 140 12 180 25th Massachusetts Martindale's Eighteenth 24 142 49 215 188th Pennsylvs's Sixth 28 131 3 162 12th New Hampshire Martindale's Eighteenth 23 129 15 167 139th New York's Second 13 124 17 154 55th Pennsylvania Martindale's Eighteenth 12 110 29 151 148th New York Martindale's Eighteenth 20 100 4 124 106th New York Ricketts's Sixth 23 88 23 134 98th New Yohe Potomac.             55th Pennsylvania Martindale's Eighteenth 24 124 8 156 1st U. S. Colors Eighteenth 15 110 10 135 2d Penn. H. A. Martindale's Eighteenth 16 94 16 126 148th New York Martindale's Eighteenth 16 74 26 116 89th New York Martindale's Eighteenth 10 82 2 94 25th MasMartindale's Eighteenth 10 82 2 94 25th Massachusetts Martindale's Eighteenth 11 44 -- 55 5th U. S. Colored Hinks's Eighteenth 8 48 20 76 Martindale's Eighteenth 11 44 -- 55 5th U. S. Colored Hinks's Eighteenth 8 48 20 76 11th Connecticut Martindale's Eighteenth 6 52 5 63 Petersburg, Va. The Ninth Corps assaulted Martindale's Eighteenth 6 52 5 63 Petersburg, Va. The Ninth Corps assaulted on the 17th; the Second Corps on the 18th.             June 17-18, 1862. Includes losses
Sixth. Aug., ‘61 7th Maine 15 113 128 3 209 212 340 Getty's Sixth. Sept., ‘61 8th Maine Reenlisted and served through the war. 6 128 134 4 243 247 381 Martindale's Eighteenth. Sept., ‘61 9th Maine Reenlisted and served through the war. 10 172 182 3 236 239 421 Ames's Tenth. Oct., ‘61 10th Maine Enlisted for t19 342 361 4 298 302 663 Gibbon's Second. Sept., ‘62 9th New York 6 198 204 3 254 257 461 Ricketts's Sixth. Sept., ‘62 10th New York   47 47 2 218 220 267 Martindale's Eighteenth. Aug., ‘63 13th New York 1 4 5 2 144 146 151   Eighteenth. Aug., ‘63 14th New York 6 220 226 2 299 301 527 Ferrero's Ninth. Oct., ‘61 15th25 Williams's Twelfth. Aug., ‘62 4th Maryland 3 32 35 1 72 73 108 Robinson's Fifth. Sept., ‘61 5th Maryland Served through the war. 1 63 64 6 91 97 161 Martindale's Eighteenth. Aug., ‘62 6th Maryland 8 120 128 1 107 108 236 Ricketts's Sixth. Aug., ‘62 7th Maryland 1 78 79 1 109 110 189 Robinson'
e secesh. These men were induced to come out of the wilderness for the purpose of joining Col. Boyd's regiment at St. Louis, and were under the direction of Capt. Martindale and Lieut. Adam. Capt. Martindale stayed behind at Coppidge's, and, laboring under a misunderstanding in regard to his statements, fifty-four of them joinCapt. Martindale stayed behind at Coppidge's, and, laboring under a misunderstanding in regard to his statements, fifty-four of them joined Col. Phelps' regiment. When Martindale came up he protested, and claimed his men. The subject seemed to be rather a perplexing one to settle satisfactorily to all parties concerned. The party brought in Mick Yates, one of McBride's lieutenants, a prisoner. They also caught Dave Lenox, but the latter managed to effect his escMartindale came up he protested, and claimed his men. The subject seemed to be rather a perplexing one to settle satisfactorily to all parties concerned. The party brought in Mick Yates, one of McBride's lieutenants, a prisoner. They also caught Dave Lenox, but the latter managed to effect his escape. The Home Guards had been some time in charge of Clark's Mill, in Douglas County. A party of three hundred secessionists, under Freeman, were on a marauding expedition in that region, and threatened the Home Guards with an attack. They had robbed the stores at Vera Cruz and other places. They were encamped at Wilson's Mill
ound; slightly bruised John Reddy, a drummer-boy, and then hopped into the air and came down without exploding. Musser subsequently died of his injuries. He lived in Jefferson County, Pa., and was a single man. Gen, Morell and staff and Gen. Martindale and staff were in the foremost places of danger with their regiments. The Berdan sharpshooters made fearful havoc among the enemy's gunners, picking them off by the dozen. Col. Berdan says they killed at least fifty of the rebels and woundd off into their intrenchments, and no more cavalry was seen during the day, except an occasional mounted man. At half-past 4 P. M. the enemy opened heavy firing from earthworks on the left of where the above shooting occurred. They made Gen. Martindale's brigade their target. Our people were ready for them. The Third Massachusetts battery took a position, and returned the fire with splendid and, as is believed, most telling effect. The rebel gunners showed more skill in sighting their p
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