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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
per Potomac to September, 1862. Near Martinsburg September 3. Bunker Hill September 3-4. Martinsburg September 6. Darkesville September 7. Williamsport, Md., September 11. Martinsburg September 11-12. Defence of Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 13-14. Regiment cut way through enemy's lines on night of September 14. Antietam, Md., September 16-18. Hagerstown, Md., September 20. Duty on Upper Potomac September 20 to December 8. Williamsport September 21. McCoy's or Russell's Ferry and near Green Springs Furnace October 10. Reconnoissance from Bolivar Heights to Rippon, W. Va., November 9. Dumfries, Va., December 26-27. At Falmouth, Va., till April 1863. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 8. Stoneman's Raid April 29-May 8. Tunstall Station May 4. Aylett's May 5. Raid from Yorktown into Matthews County May 19-23. March to Falmouth, Va., Brandy Station and Beverly Ford June 9. Upperville June 21. Expedition from Y
ead of firing upon him, when they had him absolutely in their power; or when, on the other side, General Kershaw was spared by the Union officers at Fredericksburg when he alone dared ride up to reconnoitre the enemy from a knoll which was swept by the fire of the sharpshooters of both armies. Both these last incidents are related by the Rev. Robert Wilson in the Charleston (S. C.) News and Courier, quoted in the Boston Transcript (July 14, 1896). The Richmond incident was told him by Colonel McCoy of Pennsylvania, a member of General Meade's staff, and present on the occasion described. The gradual development of the Union cavalry, which at first was distinctly inferior to the Confederate and in the end overwhelmingly superior, In Crowninshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry there is an admirable essay on the development of the Union cavalry during the war. As to the superiority of the Confederate cavalry at first, see Gordon's Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, p. 137. the Comte de Paris
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 11 (search)
f those odd rencounters which occasionally happen in the complicated action of battle. One of Bartlett's regiments (the Eighty-third Pennsylvania, under Lieutenant-Colonel McCoy), in marching up by the flank, ran plump against Brown's column, which was moving to follow up its first advantage against the right. It was one of those critical situations which a moment will decide—the decision, in fact, depending on gaining the advantage of the first volley. With quick self-possession, McCoy wheeled his forward companies into line, and secured the first fire. One of McCoy's men seized the Confederate commander by the collar and dragged him in, and the EightMcCoy's men seized the Confederate commander by the collar and dragged him in, and the Eighty-third poured into the flank and rear of the hostile brigade a volley which sent it back in disorder through the woods. The repulse of the enemy at all points on Warren's front was now complete, and nearly a thousand prisoners were taken. Warren's entire loss was not above three hundred and fifty in killed and wounded. I pass
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Stuart's expedition into Pennsylvania. (search)
ant, in compliance with instructions from the Commanding General, Army Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania, with a cavalry force of eighteen hundred men and four pieces of horse artillery, under command of Brigadier-General Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at 12 M., and marched thence to the vicinity of Hedgesville, where it camped for the night. At daylight next morning (October 10th) I crossed the Potomac at McCoy's, between Williamsport and Hancock, with some little opposition, capturing some two or three horses of the enemy's pickets. We were told here by citizens that a large force had been camped the night before at Clear Spring, and were supposed to be en route to Cumberland. We proceeded northward until we had reached the turnpike leading from Hagerstown to Hancock, known as the National road. Here a signal station on the mountain and most of the party, with their flags and apparatus, were su
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
H. L., Va., Buckingham C. H. Va., 1862. Munford, C. E., Lt., Va., Malvern Hill, Va., 1862. McAfee, M., Maj., Miss., Jackson, Miss., 1862. McAllister, J. N., Lt., Va., Okolona, Miss., 1861. McCormick, C., Surg., Va., Berryville, Va. McCoy, W., Capt., Va., 1861. McCoy, W. K., Va., Charlottesville, Va. McDaniel, J., a. McDonald, C. W., Capt., Va., Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862. McDowell, T. P., Va., Gordonsville, Va., 1862. McElmurry, W. L., Ga., Manassas Junc. Va. 1861. McCoy, W. K., Va., Charlottesville, Va. McDaniel, J., a. McDonald, C. W., Capt., Va., Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862. McDowell, T. P., Va., Gordonsville, Va., 1862. McElmurry, W. L., Ga., Manassas Junc. Va. 1861. McGehee, N. M., Va. McIntyre, A., Lt., S. C., Sharpsburg, 1862. McIver, J. K., S. C., Point Lookout, 1863. McKerall, W., La., Camp Douglas, Ill. McKim, R. B., Md., Winchester, Va. 1862. McMillin, J. M., Ky., Franklin, Tenn. 1862. McMurry, A. G., Ga., Sharpsburg, Md. 1862. McPherson, S., Ass't Surg., Va., Richmond, Va. 1863. Nelson, H. M., Maj., Va., Albemarle county, Va. 1862. Nelson, J. A., Surg., Va., Culpepper county, Va. 1863. Nelson, H., Capt., Va. Newman, W
f; both belonging to Washington county, Md. Several members of this company were also slightly wounded by pieces of shell, which were constantly bursting over the regiment. Company C, Captain E. R. Dorsey.--None killed. Wounded--Sergeant John Berryman, shot through the body and badly wounded; John Codd, severely wounded by being struck in the groin by a piece of shell. They both belong to Baltimore. Several others, whose names I do not know, were slightly injured. Company E, Captain McCoy.--Killed — none. Wounded--Lieut. Marriott, painful wound through the arm; private — Ford, shot through the arm. These are all the killed and wounded I could hear of in the regiment, though several of the men had their clothing perforated by balls. The enemy fired too high, or the loss of the brigade would have been much more severe. General Smith was shot through the shoulder and neck, but never for a moment lost his presence of mind, and insisted upon being again placed on h
de good his escape, and came into camp this afternoon, ready again to enter upon duty. The seizure of "Flora Temple." The New York Herald, of Friday last, has the following in relation to the seizure of the racing mare, Flora Temple, though the statement that Mr. McDonald is an officer in the Confederate army is untrue: The racing mare Flora Temple — well known in this and other cities for her speed and the many matches that she has made — was seized by Deputy Marshals Hunt and McCoy, on account of a libel filed against Flora by Mr. Ethan Allen, Assistant United States District Attorney, she being the property of Mr. Wm. McDonald, of Baltimore, at the present time an officer in the Southern army. This, under the late act, will render the mare the property of the United States, and unless something extraordinary occurs, she will be sold for the benefit of the Government. The race between Flora Temple and Ethan Allen was not interfered with by the Marshals, such being
bbed of a Navy revolver, and that he had seen it at the gunsmithing establishment of Mr. James Walsh. The latter being introduced as a witness, testified that he had purchased the pistol of McDonald for $40; that he had offered to sell another one to him, which he declined to buy. Clements identified the pistol. Prisoner said it belonged to Cornelius. McCoy; and the Mayor, in order to afford him a chance of producing McCoy, continued the case until this morning. McDonald was sent to jail. bbed of a Navy revolver, and that he had seen it at the gunsmithing establishment of Mr. James Walsh. The latter being introduced as a witness, testified that he had purchased the pistol of McDonald for $40; that he had offered to sell another one to him, which he declined to buy. Clements identified the pistol. Prisoner said it belonged to Cornelius. McCoy; and the Mayor, in order to afford him a chance of producing McCoy, continued the case until this morning. McDonald was sent to jail.
ing and leading his men in pursuit of the enemy, fell mortally wounded. Lieut. Moore, 12th Georgia volunteers, whilst gallantly heading a charge, fell mortally wounded. This gallant officer was ever ready for any expedition involving danger — he was truly brave. Captains Davis, Blanford, Hardeman, and Hawkins, their officers and men, behaved admirably. Captain Davis and his company were conspicuous for their gallantry and good conduct throughout the fight. Adjutant Willis, Lieutenants McCoy. Ethridge, Marshall, and Turpin, 12th Georgia regiment, deserve particular mention for their good conduct. Lieut., Col. Boykin, commanding 31st Virginia volunteers, his officers and men, deserve my thanks for their unflinching courage throughout the struggle. This regiment suffered severely. Lieutenants Poothman, J. Johnson, McNewman, J. B. Philips, all wounded, deserve honorable mention. Capt. Thompson, 31st Virginia, deserves special notice. Adjutant Morgen, Lieutenants son,
Company A, Capt. Goodwin, on the shore opposite the island. Company B, Capt. Lyle, at battery lower and of the island. Company C, Capt. Betts, in reserve some distance rear battery. Company D, Capt. Manly, in reserve some distance rear battery. Company E, Capt. Miller, in reserve some distance rear battery. Company G, Capt. Perot, in reserve some distance rear battery. Company F, Capt. Knight, in battery fighting. Company H, Capt. Jones, in reserve. Company I, Capt. McCoy, in reserve. In Port Huges. The Cabanas, Capt. Barron--80 men. The Alamance Grays, Capt. Cobb--30 men. In Fort Blanchard. Forty-four men from 31st N. C., under Lieut. Pipkins In Fort Barton. Commander; Major Hill. State Guards, Capt. Fearing. John Harvey Guards, Capt. Johnson. 46th Virginia, Col. Feamk Addersion Was engaged at the battery with two companies of the 46th Va. 46th Virginia, Maj. Fry. Four companies--Capts. Crank, Mille
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