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The Richmond correspondent of the Charleston Courier, of the 15th, has the following paragraph:--The filibusteros who filled the world with so much angry declamation a few years ago, are figuring prominently in the Southern armies at the present time. The tall and martial Henningsen left to-day for the West, to assume the colonelcy of the Third regiment in Wise's brigade. Frank Anderson will be his lieutenant-colonel. Colonel Charles Carroll Hicks is a lieutenant in a company of Colonel McLaw's regiment, now at Yorktown. General Bob Wheat greatly distinguished himself as commander of a New Orleans military corps at Manassas. Major O'Hara, of Cuban fame, has a commission in the army. Colonel Rudler, I see, is raising a company for the war in Georgia. An English filibuster, one Major Atkins, a tall, big-whiskered, loose-trowsered, haw-haw specimen of a Londoner, who was with Garibaldi in Sicily, and who is just over, fought gallantly by the side of Wheat, at Manassas.
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
d been ordered there from Richmond, to organize a large cavalry force with which to resist our progress. General Hardee was ahead, between us and Savannah, with McLaw's division, and other irregular troops, that could not, I felt assured, exceed ten thousand men. I caused the fine depot at Millen to be destroyed, and other damagd, along with it, on the 5th of December, I reached Ogeechee Church, about fifty miles from Savannah, and found there fresh earthworks, which had been thrown up by McLaw's division; but he must have seen that both his flanks were being turned, and prudently retreated to Savannah without a fight. All the columns then pursued leisurw that General Kilpatrick was skirmishing with Wheeler's cavalry, which persistently followed him. But the infantry columns had met with no oppositibn whatsoever. McLaw's division was falling back before us, and we occasionally picked up a few of his men as prisoners, who insisted that we would meet with strong opposition at Savan
position. For the present I can only mention the following: Killed: Brigadier-Generals Starke and Branch; Colonel Douglas, of the Thirteenth Georgia, commanding brigade; Colonel Homes, of the Second Georgia; Colonel Milligan, of the Fifteenth Georgia; Colonel S. B. Smith, of the Twenty-seventh Georgia; Colonel Newton, of the Sixth Georgia; Captain Nesbit, commanding Third Georgia, and Lieutenant-Colonel Barclay, of the Twenty-third Georgia, (reported killed;) Major T. S. McIntosh, of General McLaw's staff, and Lieutenant S. B. Parkman, of Read's Georgia battery. Also, Col. Strong, Captains Ritchie and Calloway, and Lieutenants Little and Lynne of the Sixth Louisiana, and Captain McFarland and Lieutenant Newman, of the Seventh Louisiana. Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who s
position. For the present I can only mention the following: Killed: Brigadier-Generals Starke and Branch; Colonel Douglas, of the Thirteenth Georgia, commanding brigade; Colonel Homes, of the Second Georgia; Colonel Milligan, of the Fifteenth Georgia; Colonel S. B. Smith, of the Twenty-seventh Georgia; Colonel Newton, of the Sixth Georgia; Captain Nesbit, commanding Third Georgia, and Lieutenant-Colonel Barclay, of the Twenty-third Georgia, (reported killed;) Major T. S. McIntosh, of General McLaw's staff, and Lieutenant S. B. Parkman, of Read's Georgia battery. Also, Col. Strong, Captains Ritchie and Calloway, and Lieutenants Little and Lynne of the Sixth Louisiana, and Captain McFarland and Lieutenant Newman, of the Seventh Louisiana. Wounded: Major-General Anderson, of South-Carolina; Brigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who s
, but were quickly dispossessed and repulsed with loss. During the attack on our right the enemy was crossing troops over his bridges at Fredericksburgh, and massing them in front of Longstreet's line. Soon after his repulse on our right, he commenced a series of attacks on our left, with a view of obtaining possession of the heights immediately overlooking the town. These repeated attacks were repulsed in gallant style by the Washington artillery, under Colonel Walton, and a portion of McLaw's division, which occupied these heights. The last assault was made after dark, when Col. Alexander's battalion had relieved the Washington artillery, (whose ammunition had been exhausted,) and ended the contest for the day. The enemy was supported in his attacks by the fire of strong batteries of artillery on the right bank of the river, as well as by his numerous heavy batteries on the Stafford heights. Our loss during the operations, since the movements of the enemy began, amounts t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The relative strength of the armies of Generals Lee and Grant. (search)
0 was caused by the departure of Longstreet's corps from the army during that month, two divisions of it going to Chickamauga, and the other (Pickett's) to the south-side of James river. The strength of that entire corps was then a little less than 12,000 for duty. The returns for March, 1864, show in the Department of Northern Virginia 39,407 for duty, while those for April show 52,626 for duty-this increase resulting from the return of the two divisions of Longstreet's corps (Field's and McLaw's afterwards Kershaw's) which had been at the battle of Chickamauga and afterwards on a winter campaign in East Tennessee, also of some detachments which had been on special service, and of furloughed men. These returns were made at the end of and for the whole month of April, and not on the 20th of the month as stated by General Badeau. Longstreet's two divisions had then returned and were embraced in said monthly returns, his third division being at that time in North Carolina and not aft
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General A. P. Hill's report of battle of Gettysburg. (search)
d by General Pettigrew) in reserve. Colonel Walker had distributed his artillery along this line in the most eligible positions. The corps of General Longstreet (McLaw's and Hood's divisions) was on my right, and in a line very nearly at right angles to mine. General Longstreet was to attack the left-flank of the enemy, and sweeith him with such of my brigades from the right as could join in with his troops in the attack. Hood, on the extreme left, commenced the attack about two o'clock; McLaw's about half-past 5. Soon after McLaws moved forward, General Anderson moved forward the brigades of Wilcox, Perrin and Wright in echelon. The charge of these three brigades was very gallantly made, and pressed on until Wilcox's right became separated from McLaw's left. Wilcox and Wright drove the enemy from their intrenchments, inflicting very heavy loss upon them. Wilcox's brigade succeeded in capturing eight pieces of artillery, and Wright's brigade about twenty. The enemy threw forwar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign of Chancellorsville — by Theodore A. Dodge, United States army. (search)
General Lee followed close upon the Federal retreat, and during the afternoon felt Hooker's lines in his front, to see if they presented any favorable point of attack. He found the Federal centre and left flank too strongly posted to invite assault, and on Friday night directed Jackson to move the next day around the Federal army, and attack its right flank and rear. Jackson began this manoeuvre in the early morning, taking some 26,000 infantry, while General Lee retained Anderson's and McLaw's divisions, amounting to 16,000 or 17,000 men, opposite Hooker's center and left wing. All day was consumed by Jackson in moving around the front of the Federal army, and in getting into position beyond and to the rear of its right flank. The distance was twelve or fifteen miles, and the route a narrow defile through a dense wilderness. Though conducted with all possible rapidity, secrecy and skill, this movement was discovered early in the day by Sickles, whose corps (Third) was next to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
the night General Longstreet had arrived and assumed command of the left wing; at dawn he commenced the arrangement of his line; Hindman's division was placed on the extreme left; Wheeler's cavalry on the flank; Johnston's division was next to Hindman's, and Stewart's on the right of Johnston's. Each division had two brigades in front and one in the rear. Preston's division was placed in reserve on the left; Law's division in the rear of Johnston's. The brigades of Kershaw and Humphries, of McLaw's division, commanded by Kershaw, were posted in rear of Law. Johnston's, Laws's and Kershaw's commands were under Hood, and formed a column of eight brigades, arranged four lines deep. This General Longstreet intended as his principal column of attack. General Longstreet having understood a gap existed between the wings of the army, had at the beginning of his formation moved Stewart's division some five hundred or six hundred yards to the right. This movement placed Stewart's divis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
n's picket force on the morning of the 15th caught two hundred and ninety of the enemy who had failed to cross for some reason and his ordnance officer also collected forty-four hundred small arms abandoned on his position of the field. The total capture of small arms was therefore near ten thousand. The casualties in Longstreet's corps were as follows:  Killed.Wounded.Missing.Total.Aggregate.  Officers.Men.Officers.Men.Officers.Men.Officers.Men. Anderson's Division 11129244016143159 McLaw's Division11895064116762797859 Pickett's Division 3248 125254 Hood's Division4507178 1211240251 Ransom's Division37730425  33502535 Washington Artillery Battalion 3123  12627 Alexander's Artillery Battalion 1 10   1111 Total182341021,42151201251,7711,896 The casualties in Jackson's corps were twenty-six officers killed and one hundred and ninety-five wounded; three hundred and eighteen men killed and twenty-three hundred and fifty wounded; eighteen officers and five hundr
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