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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 21 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1863., [Electronic resource] 20 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 18 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 15 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 12 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
ture the camp of that bold partisan on two different occasions. In the Shenandoah Valley, under Milroy, it performed many bold deeds, in company with the regiment, while fighting against Mosby, GilmoLee slipped away from Hooker at Fredericksburg, en route for Gettysburg, and suddenly confronted Milroy at Winchester. The First New York Cavalry were at Berryville, and were compelled to retire befoicely, killing and wounding over fifty of them, and causing them to retire from the field. When Milroy found he was surrounded by Lee's army, he sent for a bold officer and fifty men to carry a dispaWashington that Lee's army was at Winchester. That night, a dispatch arrived at Martinsburg for Milroy, and three men of Boyd's company volunteered to take it through. Their names were Oliver Lumphrnts. After several hair-breadth escapes, they arrived in the beleaguered town at midnight, and Milroy called a council of war. It was determined to spike the guns, destroy the artillery ammunition,
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson and his men. (search)
peculiar fancy, he would smile in mild approval. He did not live apart from his staff, but liked to have them about him, and they were nearly all very young men. Universally polite in manner, he encouraged the liveliest conversation among them, although he took little part in it. He was not a man of words; they seemed to embarrass him. When he had ideas he put them into action, not into language. His military dispatches were as brief as if studied, like the one he sent after the defeat of Milroy: God blessed our arms with victory at McDowell yesterday. He never discussed his plans; indeed, he never told them. The next officer under him never knew his intention nor object. He never volunteered his opinion to his superior, nor asked advice of his subordinates. He was as self-reliant as he was silent, and believed he walks with speed who walks alone. He was reticent to a fault. If my coat knew what I intended to do, I'd take it off and throw it away, was one of his sayings. This
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
occupied Harrisonburg, twelve or fifteen miles in Jackson's front. Schenck and Milroy, commanding Fremont's advance of six thousand men, were in front of Edward JohnFremont. The Warm Springs turnpike afforded Banks a ready mode of uniting with Milroy and Schenck, in which case Staunton would be any easy capture. Fremont was alrent, if possible, by uniting his own force to that of Johnson, and falling upon Milroy while Ewell kept Banks in check. Then he would join Ewell and with all his str dispositions to seize the road in the rear of the enemy during the night. But Milroy and Schenck have united, and seeing their position untenable, make a fierce atttaunton. Uniting Johnson's force with his own, he appears suddenly in front of Milroy, at McDowell, only eight days after having left Swift Run gap. He has marched e hundred miles and crossed the Blue ridge twice in this time, and now repulses Milroy and Schenck, and follows them up to Franklin. Then, finding Fremont within sup
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 11: McDowell. (search)
nizing a powerful force at Wheeling, while General Milroy, under his orders, confronted the Confederks to this spot; where proper concert with General Milroy, in front, would have ensured the destructard Johnson to deliver a crushing blow against Milroy, and then associated his and General Ewell's fo the Blue Ridge. Thus the advanced forces of Milroy were brought within ten miles of Staunton, andbled him thus to envelop and crush the army of Milroy. But that officer had astuteness enough, them. After marching west for a few miles, General Milroy sought the sources of the South Branch of neral Banks might have communicated succors to Milroy were immediately obstructed, and an active offtroy the bridges, in order that the retreat of Milroy might be retarded, and the advance of Fremont Jackson resolved to discontinue his pursuit of Milroy, and return to pay his respects to General Ban of such a collision as that, with Fremont and Milroy united, should not be taken without the advant[2 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 12: Winchester. (search)
sed to them from a Divine Providence merciful to the Confederates, in which every movement was a blunder. The aggressive attempt upon Staunton was postponed, at the precise juncture when it should have been pressed with all their forces combined; and General Banks was consigned to the defence of Strasbourg. Whereas, if Staunton was not won at once, then his whole force should have been transferred without delay to aid an aggressive movement from Fredericksburg, as General Lee anticipated. Milroy having been caught, beaten, and chased, like a hunted beast, through the mountains, Blenker's division was now hurried to the support of him and General Fremont. It arrived just when Jackson had left them alone, and it left General Banks just when he was about to be assailed by him. Worse than all: as though an army of nearly forty thousand men, under Generals McDowell and Augur, were not enough to protect the road from Fredericksburg to Washington against the embarrassed Confederates, Ban
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 13: Port Republic. (search)
he river with a portion of the artillery, and posted upon the north side, to observe the discomfited enemy about Lewiston. The remainder of his division was disposed so as to be ready for the support of Ewell. These dispositions had not been completed, when the firing to the north told that he was seriously engaged with Fremont. This General had moved out to the attack from Harrisonburg, (doubtless expecting the assistance of Shields upon the other side,) with the divisions of Blenker, Milroy and Schenck, making seven brigades of infantry, a brigade of cavalry, and a powerful train of artillery. This army was correctly estimated by General Ewell, at eighteen thousand men. His own division had now been recruited, by the addition of the six regiments of General Edward Johnson, known as the army of the northwest. Of these, the 12th Georgia, and the 25th and 31st Virginia, had been attached to the Brigade of Elzey; and the 52nd, 58th and 44th Virginia, lately under Colonel Scott, h
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 18: Fredericksburg. (search)
ur cause, and for mel I greatly prize the prayers of the pious. The new year brought him the sad news of the re-occupation of Winchester by the Federal army. His friends there were now subjected to the tyranny and outrages of the Federal General Milroy. Under his rule, the most vexatious and cruel restrictions were placed upon the people; and the plunder of their dwellings was shamelessly transferred to the private baggage of the Commander. Nothing which could, characterize the baseness of a petty despot, was lacking to the history of this man; and when, after the fall of General Jackson, Winchester was recaptured by his corps under General Ewell, Milroy crowned his infamy by running away from his command through by-roads, leaving them without a leader in the clutches of the avenging patriots. The story of the wrongs of the people now stirred the depths of Jackson's heart. His estimate of the value of the district to the Confederacy was revived by his grief and indignation, an
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 4: details of the battle of Manassas. (search)
uch forbearance and propriety as if they were at their own homes. They are here to fight the enemies of the country, not to judge and punish the unarmed and helpless, however guilty they may be. When necessary, that will be done by the proper person. By command of General McDowell. Jas. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant General. This order deserves to be exhumed from the oblivion into which it seems to have fallen, and is in strong contrast with the subsequent practice under Butler, Pope, Milroy, Hunter, Sheridan, Sherman, etc. This war order of McDowell's might well have been commended to the consideration of military satraps set, to rule over the people of the South in a time of peace. It did not prevent the burning of the entire village of Germantown, a few miles from Fairfax Court-House, but the citizens agreed that McDowell had made an honest effort to prevent depredations by his troops; and it gives me pleasure to make the statement, as it is the last time I will have occasio
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Run. (search)
ements on our side being under the superintendence of General Stuart, and on the side of the enemy under that of Brigadier General Milroy. Milroy, in his report, states that the truce was requested by us, but General Jackson says it was applied foMilroy, in his report, states that the truce was requested by us, but General Jackson says it was applied for by the enemy, and no one will doubt his word. I know that the extension was applied for by Milroy or his staff officer, for I was on the ground in communication with General Stuart at the time. This same Milroy was himself prevented by me from riMilroy or his staff officer, for I was on the ground in communication with General Stuart at the time. This same Milroy was himself prevented by me from riding to the rear of the ground on which the enemy's dead lay, and he witnessed the taking from the field, under my directions, of very large quantities of small arms, which had been abandoned by Banks' men on the day of the battle. I went on theMilroy was himself prevented by me from riding to the rear of the ground on which the enemy's dead lay, and he witnessed the taking from the field, under my directions, of very large quantities of small arms, which had been abandoned by Banks' men on the day of the battle. I went on the field under General Ewell's orders, to superintend the burial of a portion of our dead, who had not been buried by their proper commanders. I found on the field, stacked up, a very large quantity of excellent rifles, which the division, detailed to
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 22: capture of Winchester. (search)
ing sent to the right to Berryville, where there was also a force. Milroy occupied the town of Winchester with a considerable force in strong a son in the service, and who had been made to feel the tyranny of Milroy. Mr. Baker thoroughly understood the object in view, and fully appnd posted at different points notices to the following effect: General Milroy orders all of the timber east of this point to be cleared off. nd that General Johnson's division had captured the greater part of Milroy's force, Milroy himself having made his escape with a small fractioMilroy himself having made his escape with a small fraction of his command, principally mounted on the mules and horses taken from the wagons and artillery that had been left behind, and I therefore dnothing was accomplished by the attempts made at further pursuit of Milroy, and he succeeded in getting in safety to Harper's Ferry. Durinate, which fell into our hands. In the hurry of the movement after Milroy was found to have evacuated, I made such arrangements as I could to
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