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g was severe. Their loss in supposed to be great. Ours is known to be small. J. E. Johnston, General. From Morgan's command. We have information from a reliable source that Gen John H Morgan's command has safely arrived in South weMorgan's command has safely arrived in South western Virginia. All the Yankee accounts of a failure of the expedition and the defeat of Morgan are pure fabrications. He destroyed a very large amount of property, and captured from 2,500 to 3,000 prisoners, who were released on parole. His losseMorgan are pure fabrications. He destroyed a very large amount of property, and captured from 2,500 to 3,000 prisoners, who were released on parole. His losses, we understand, were comparatively slight. Captain John Marshall, of Morgan's command, a son of Hon. Humphrey Marshall, of this city, was captured in Kentucky, and is now a prisoner in the hands of the enemy. Hunter's retreat. PersonsMorgan's command, a son of Hon. Humphrey Marshall, of this city, was captured in Kentucky, and is now a prisoner in the hands of the enemy. Hunter's retreat. Persons living in the upper part of Bedford county report that Hunter's army, on its retreat from Lynchburg, drove through that section at a furious rate, under whip and spur. The road was lined with dead horses, that had either given up the ghost from ove
The Daily Dispatch: June 29, 1864., [Electronic resource], The fight with Hunter's command at Hanging Rock. (search)
he railroad, except the burning of the depot at Big Lick — and for the same reason the country along the route suffered very little, in fact, none at all, except that committed by petty thieves and small straggling parties. On reaching Salem, the enemy determined to continue his retreat to Christiansburg, with the intention of pushing on to the Lead Mines and Salt Works, and in fact, a large portion of his wagon train had been sent forward in that direction, begetting information that Gen Morgan had returned from Kentucky and was at the Salt Works with five thousand men, he changed his course and took the road leading to Newcastle and Sweet Springs. Hunter, however, had not proceeded on this road but a few miles, when he found that the vigilant Gen McCausland was in his front, and almost before he was aware of it some ten or twelve pieces of his artillery, twenty five or thirty wagons, between two and three hundred prisoners, a number of negroes and about two hundred horses were
f horses and causing a hasty skedaddling of Yankees generally. Morgan's expedition to Kentucky. We had an interview yesterday with a gentleman who accompanied Gen. Morgan's command on its recent expedition to Kentucky. The object of this movement, it appears, was to prevenestern Virginia, and proved a complete success. On the 7th of June Morgan's command engaged the enemy, seven hundred strong, at Pound Gap, anunded, and surrendered without unnecessary delay. The next morning Morgan's command commenced the return to Virginia, and safely brought off t works and lead mines in Virginia, and it will thus be seen that Gen Morgan's expedition was a timely movement. He was to have a large forcers captured was twenty-two hundred--numerically a Garger force than Morgan's whole command. They were paroled at different points in the Staresults accomplished, it must be harsh judgment that would withhold from Gen. Morgan and his command the credit which is justly their due.
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