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Browsing named entities in Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall). You can also browse the collection for Lucy Osgood or search for Lucy Osgood in all documents.

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Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1862. I thank you heartily for thinking of me at New Year's time. The echo of hand clapping, which you heard when news came of the capture of Port Royal, was not from me. I have had but one approach to a pleasurable sensation connected with public affairs since this war began, and that was when I read Fremont's proclamation. He acknowledged the slaves as men. Nobody else, except the old Garrisonian abolitionists, seems to have the faintest idea that they have any rights which we are bound to recognize. They are to be freed or not, according to our necessities or convenience, and then we are to do what we please with them, without consulting their interest or convenience. It is the same hateful pro-slavery spirit everywhere. I felt very little interest in the capture of Mason and Slidell. It did not seem to me of much consequence, especially as their dispatches were carried to Europe. Living up here in Wayland, at a distance from cities and rai
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, December, 1862. Your letter did me an unco deal oa gude, as your letters always do. I agree with you entirely about the buss fuss of metaphysics. It has always been my aversion. More than thirty years ago, when Mrs. R. was intimate at my brother's, I used to hear her discuss Kant's philosophy with collegian visitors, until I went to bed without knowing whether or not I had hung myself over the chair and put my clothes into bed. I met Mrs. R. in the cars several days ago, after an interval of twenty years, and what do you think? In ten minutes she had plunged into the depths of Kant's philosophy, and was trying to pull me after her. But I resisted stoutly. I do sometimes like a bank of fog to look at, if there are plenty of rainbows on it; but I have no fancy for sailing through it. Circumstances afterward made me acquainted with the transcendentalists, and I attended some of their meetings, where I saw plenty of fog with rainbows flitting over it
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1863. I am glad your Philadelphia campaign proved so glorious. I hope you will enjoy many such. After all, I think the careful housewife was the largest element in your good time at Philadelphia. The older I grow the more I respect the careful Marthas. I would rather have one for a household companion than ten devout and contemplative Marys. They did very well in the days when saints went barefoot and wore a perennial suit of hair-cloth: but the Marthas are decidedly preferable in these days of nicely-ironed linen, daily renewed, and stockings so flimsy that they need continual looking after. Devout, poetic saints must have careful Marthas to provide for them if they would be comfortable themselves, or be able to promote the happiness of others. Mr. S- says his wife is a careful Martha. I wonder what would have become of him and the boys if she had been of the Mary pattern. All hail to the careful Marthas! say I. If I had one I would kiss he
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Francis G. Shaw. (search)
r. I also hope to make three or four hundred dollars by my forthcoming book for old people. Under these circumstances, I think you will see that I ought not to receive help when there are so many sufferers in the land who need it more than I do. You will see that it is not pride, dearest friend, but conscience. Never, never shall I forget your kindness in sending it. It did me a world of good, when I felt so stunned and desolate. But I am getting bravely over all that now. I reproach myself for having cared so much about a home, when so many homes are ruthlessly broken up. The debris of a fire is bad, but what is it compared with the desolation wrought by a mob? I am most sincerely sorry for James Gibbons and his family. Mr. Gibbons's house in New York city was gutted by the mob during the draft riots of July, 1863. Miss Osgood told me they had one room consecrated to interesting souvenirs of their lost Willie. How dreadful it must have been to have that pillaged by a mob!
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1864. I joyfully hailed the sight of your hand-writing; more joyfully even than usual; because I conjectured that you would write about the biography of Theodore Parker. It is an inspiring book, making one feel that there is nobleness in the battle of life when a true man girds on his armor for the fight. This record confirms my impression that Theodore Parker was the greatest man, morally and intellectually, that our country has ever produced. The manner in which the book is made up is, I think, open to some criticism. In the first place, there is the general fault of containing too much. It seems to me that if one half, or at least one third, had been omitted, the remaining portion would have been more unqualifiedly interesting. In the second place, the arrangement is not orderly. In the third place, the sentences of Mr. Weiss sometimes need studying to discover his meaning. I have great respect and admiration for Mr. Weiss, but I do not like
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1865. I thank you for your two right pleasant letters. I have several times been amused at being charged with totally different deficiencies by different people. You accuse me of being indifferent to externals, whereas the common charge against me is that I think too much of beauty, and say too much about it. I myself think it is one of my greatest weaknesses. A handsome man, woman, or child, can always make a fool and a pack-horse of me. My next neighbor's little boy has me completely under his thumb, merely by virtue of his beautiful eyes and sweet voice. I have been a very happy woman since this year came in. My Sunset book Looking towards Sunset. From Sources Old and New, Original and Selected. By L. Maria Child. Boston, 1864. has had most unexpected success. The edition of 4,000 sold before New Year's Day, and they say they might have sold 2,000 more if they had been ready. This pleases me beyond measure, for the proceeds, whether mor
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1865. I received a letter last week from William H. Channing, in acknowledgment of funds sent to the freedmen in his department. He is the same infinite glow that he was when he took my heart captive twenty years ago. He writes: You ought to have been in Congress on the ever-to-be-remembered 31st of January 1865.1 Such an outburst of the people's heart has never been seen in the Capitol since the nation was born. It was the sunrise of a new day for the republic. I was standing by John Jay, and as we shook hands over the glorious vote I could not but say, Are not our fathers and grandfathers here with us? They surely must be here to share our joy in thus gathering the fruit of which they planted the seed. Yes! and our blessed, great-hearted Theodore Parker was there, with a band of witnesses. Selah! 1 The day on which the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, abolishing slavery in the United States, passed the House of Representatives, an
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1866. It seems a long while since I received your very lively letter. With regard to the comparative value of novels and sermons, you go farther for your side than I could go for mine. You confess to enjoying a dullish sermon. I cannot wade through a dullish novel. A third-rate one I never read, unless I read it aloud, to oblige some one else; and I can scarcely tolerate even second-rate ones. A first-rate novel I do enjoy better than any other reading. I like them better now than I did in my youth; partly because the need of being entertained grows upon people in general as the sad experiences of life multiply, and partly because I live so much in solitude that pictures of society supply, in some degree, the place of society. I agree with you entirely with regard to public teaching at stated seasons. I think all classes of minds would be benefited by it. What I complain of is that they do not really get teaching. The habits and wants of s
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. Wayland, 1869. I have read a good many of Taine's papers on Art, and always with great zest. His descriptions of Venice in Les Deux Mondes is wonderfully glowing and poetic. It was almost like seeing that city of enchantment. Max Muller's Clips I have never seen. The greatest extravagance I have committed for years was buying his Science of language, price seven dollars, as a birthday present for my philological mate. His habit of digging for the origin of words has proved contagious, and he often expresses surprise at the help my quick guesses afford him in his patient researches. I resolutely read Max Muller's Science of language, and picked up a good many new ideas and valuable suggestions; but to read it with full understanding required a great deal more learning than I possess. A friend is accustomed to say that my bark is worse than my bite ; and it is something so with regard to my theological intolerance. For instance, I have given yearly to
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
To Miss Lucy Osgood. 1870. You say you sometimes think we should be greatly strengthened if we could be sure of a real bona fide Thus saith the Lord. I don't think so. If it had been good for us, Divine Providence would have so ordered it. It is obviously a part of his plan that we should work our own passage through in the darkness, or rather by the far-off gleam of a few guiding stars, and it seems to me that in no other way could we become educated for a higher plane of existence. You are mainly anxious for this bona fide revelation on account of the ignorant masses, which you think need to lean on authority. You need not be concerned on that score, my friend. Just so long as the multitude need to believe that Jesus was God, they will believe it. You and I could n't take that faith from them while it was a necessity of their souls, even if we wished to do it. Divine Providence takes care that neither the old material nor spiritual skin shall fall off till a new one has f
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