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C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Sir Richard Francis Burton), AN INVITATION TO POET CECILIUS (search)
AN INVITATION TO POET CECILIUS Now to that tender bard, my Comrade fair, (Cecilius) say I, " Paper go, declare, Verona must we make and bid to New Comum's town-walls and Larian Shores adieu;" For I determined certain fancies he Accept from mutual friend to him and me. Wherefore he will, if wise, devour the way, Though the blonde damsel thousand times essay Recall his going and with arms a-neck A-winding would e'er seek his course to check; A girl who (if the truth be truly told) Dies of a hopeless passion uncontroul'd; For since the doings of the Díndymus-dame, By himself storied, she hath read, a flame Wasting her inmost marrow-core hath burned. I pardon thee, than Sapphic Muse more learn'd, Damsel : for truly sung in sweetest lays Was by Cecilius Magna Mater's praise
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers), Poem 35 (search)
Paper, I would like you say to that sweet poet, my comrade, Caecilius, that he come to Verona, quitting New Comum's city-walls and Larius' shore; for I want him to receive certain thoughts from a friend of his and mine. Therefore, if he is wise, he'll devour the way, although a bright-hued girl a thousand times calls him back when he goes, and flinging both arms around his neck asks him to delay—she who now, if truth is reported to me, is undone with immoderate love of him. For, since the time she read the beginning of his Mistress of Dindymus, flames have been devouring the innermost marrow of the poor little girl. I forgive you, girl, more learned than the Sapphic muse: for charmingly has the Great Mother been begun by Caecilius.
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers), Poem 67 (search)
nerve than he was needed, who could unloose the virgin's belt. Catullus You tell of an excellent parent marvellous in piety, who himself urinated in the womb of his son! Door But Brixia says that she has knowledge of not only this, placed beneath the Cycnean peak, through which the golden-hued Mella flows with its gentle current, Brixia, beloved mother of my Verona. For she talks of the loves of Postumius and of Cornelius, with whom that one committed foul adultery. Catullus Someone might say here: “How do know you these things, O door? you who are never allowed absence from your lord's threshold, nor may hear folk's gossip, but fixed to this beam are accustomed only to open or to shut the house!” Door Often have I hea
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 264 (search)
Hospitio cum iungeret absens 9. 361. Sociusque vocari: comp. 11 105. Fragmm. Vat. and Verona, Rom. &. have sociusve.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 412 (search)
It is difficult to decide between manet (Verona fragm., Med. first reading, Gud.) restored by Heins., and tenet (Med. second reading, Rom., Verona Schol.), recalled by Wagn. Tenet nomen 6. 235.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 505 (search)
The Fury contrives that the peasants should be at hand. Olli, Rom., Med. first reading, illi, Med. second reading, Verona fragm., Gud. Pestis of a Fury 12. 845. Cerda strangely supposes the sense to be that the passion for war is concealed in the rustic nature.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 568 (search)
Horrendum et saevi is the reading of all Ribbeck's MSS. but one (Pal. and Vat. and Verona fragmm. are wanting), which omits et. Serv. says that ancient copies read specus horrendus, which doubtless shows that they had not the copula, though it has been suggested that the copyists may have thought that us could be elided. Et was omitted by Heins. and Heyne, who read monstratur; but the authority seems insufficient, especially as the copies which omit et do not agree in reading monstratur. Rom. is the only one of Ribbeck's MSS. that has monstratur, and it retains et. Specus is fem. in Ennius, Pacuvius, and Attius, masc. in ordinary Latin, neut. here and in Sil. 13. 425. Specus is the pool, spiracula the apertures. The latter name, and that of Charoneae scrobes, are said by Pliny 2. 93 to have been generally given to places of this kind. Comp. Lucr. 6.762 foll., where the supernatural explanation is protested against. For saevi Wagn. rightly comp. v. 84, saevam mephitim. Spiracula mundi
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 589 (search)
Mole is of course for mole sua (10. 771), which would be the more regular expression. Med. (corrected), Verona fragm. &c. omit et, owing to a wrong punctuation, condemned by Serv., by which the stop was placed after scopuli. Scopuli are the peaks, saxa the smaller rocks over which the sea breaks (spumea), while rupes is the whole cliff. Nequiquam, because, in spite of the din, the cliff remains unmoved.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 33 (search)
The robe of the river-god represents his waters: comp. v. 712 below. Rivergods are represented in works of art with a similar covering. For eum Rom. and Verona fragm. have cum.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 380 (search)
For abitum Med. (second reading), Pal., Rom., fragm. Verona, and originally Gud. have aditum, which was the old reading before Heins. Serv. however distinctly prefers abitum, which is required by the sense. Coronant i. q. cingunt, as in Lucr. 2.802, pluma columbarum . . . Quae sita cervices circum collumque coronat and other instances quoted by Forc., with a further reference to the use of corona as a military term for besiegers surrounding a place (Forc. corona).
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