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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for William Porter or search for William Porter in all documents.

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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, First meeting with Secretary Stanton-General Rosecrans-Commanding military division of Mississippi-Andrew Johnson's Address-arrival at Chattanooga (search)
ering it, fearing something would be expected from me in response. I was relieved, however, the people assembled having apparently heard enough. At all events they commenced a general hand-shaking, which, although trying where there is so much of it, was a great relief to me in this emergency. From Nashville I telegraphed to Burnside, who was then at Knoxville, that important points in his department ought to be fortified, so that they could be held with the least number of men; to Admiral Porter at Cairo, that Sherman's advance had passed Eastport, Mississippi, that rations were probably on their way from St. Louis by boat for supplying his army, and requesting him to send a gunboat to convoy them; and to Thomas, suggesting that large parties should be put at work on the wagon-road then in use back to Bridgeport. On the morning of the 21st we took the train for the front, reaching Stevenson, Alabama, after dark. Rosecrans was there on his way north. He came into my car and
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The campaign in Georgia-Sherman's March to the sea-war anecdotes-the March on Savannah- investment of Savannah-capture of Savannah (search)
man's views about the next campaign. City Point, Va., Sept. 12, 1864 Major-General W. T. Sherman, Commanding Mil. Division of the Mississippi. I send Lieutenant-Colonel Porter, of my staff, with this. Colonel Porter will explain to you the exact condition of affairs here better than I can do in the limits of a letter. AlthougColonel Porter will explain to you the exact condition of affairs here better than I can do in the limits of a letter. Although I feel myself strong enough for offensive operations, I am holding on quietly to get advantage of recruits and convalescents, who are coming forward very rapidly. My lines are necessarily very long, extending from Deep Bottom north of the James across the peninsula formed by the Appomattox and the James, and south of the Appomaismounted cavalry. Bragg has gone from Wilmington. I am trying to take advantage of his absence to get possession of that place. Owing to some preparations Admiral Porter and General Butler are making to blow up Fort Fisher (which, while hoping for the best, I do not believe a particle in), there is a delay in getting this expe
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Expedition against Fort Fisher-attack on the Fort-failure of the expedition-second expedition against the Fort-capture of Fort Fisher (search)
eat havoc and make the capture an easy matter. Admiral Porter, who was to command the naval squadron, seemed so that the outer vessels could fire between them. Porter was thus enabled to throw one hundred and fifteen se inside of the stockade. At night Butler informed Porter of his withdrawal, giving the reasons above stated,s his men could embark to start for Hampton Roads. Porter represented to him that he had sent to Beaufort forhope, be known. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General Porter sent dispatches to the Navy Department in which he der. As soon as I heard this I sent a messenger to Porter with a letter asking him to hold on. I assured him a. He was instructed to communicate freely with Porter and have entire harmony between army and navy, becad it so as to face the other way. Terry now saw Porter and arranged for an assault on the following day. Twho commanded the assaulting column moved at 3.30. Porter landed a force of sailors and marines to move again
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Morale of the two armies-relative conditions of the North and South-President Lincoln visits Richmond-arrival at Washington-President Lincoln's assassination--President Johnson's policy (search)
alf the National army was engaged in guarding lines of supplies, or were on leave, sick in hospital or on detail which prevented their bearing arms. Then, again, large forces were employed where no Confederate army confronted them. I deem it safe to say that there were no large engagements where the National numbers compensated for the advantage of position and intrenchment occupied by the enemy. While I was in pursuit of General Lee, the President went to Richmond in company with Admiral Porter, and on board his flagship. He found the people of that city in great consternation. The leading citizens among the people who had remained at home surrounded him, anxious that something should be done to relieve them from suspense. General Weitzel was not then in the city, having taken offices in one of the neighboring villages after his troops had succeeded in subduing the conflagration which they had found in progress on entering the Confederate capital. The President sent for him
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