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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 4 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 3 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 2 2 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 3: a Shelley manuscript (search)
hat unique, battered, dingy little quarto volume of Shelley's manuscript poems in his own handwriting and that of his wife first given by Miss Jane Clairmont (Shelley's Constantia ) to Mr. Edward A. Silsbee, and then preseited many of its various readings in his edition of Shelley's poems. But he has passed by a good many others; hese need, I think, for the sake of all students of Shelley, to be put in print, so that in case of the loss ortes or supplemental notes, and yet not cancelled by Shelley: Three days the flowers of the garden fair Likethere are many cases where the manuscript shows, in Shelley's own handwriting, variations subsequently cancellehen the original form of language, as it appears in Shelley's handwriting, italicizing the words which vary, ane that, in a few cases, it may have been made by Mrs. Shelley. Gazed through clear dew on the tender sky. ve Plant, except that there is a cancelled verse of Shelley's Curse against Lord Eldon for depriving him of his
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 4: a world outside of science (search)
arly fifty years ago. The imagination is paralyzed before a step so vast; yet it all lies within the domain of science, while science can tell us no more how Macbeth or Hamlet came into existence than if the new astronomy had never been born. It is as true of the poem as of the poet--Nascitur non fit. We cannot even define what poetry is; and Thoreau says that there never yet was a definition of it so good but the poet would proceed to disregard it by setting aside all its requisitions. Shelley says that a man cannot say, I will compose poetry. The greatest poet even cannot say it, for the mind in creation is as a fading coal, which some invisible influence, like an inconstant wind, awakens to transitory brightness; this power arises from within, like the color of a flower which fades and changes as it is developed, and the conscious portions of our nature are unprophetic either of its approach or its departure. Defense of poetry, Essays and Letters, Am. ed. i. 56. In the sam
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
f Scott's Marmion; it was barely completed with Sigurd the Volsung of William Morris; it included the lives of Byron and Shelley and most that was best in those of Tennyson, Arnold, Browning. It began the year following Joel Barlow's American epic passion for friends; without being a recluse, he never craved comradeship, like Whitman, for humanity's sake, nor, like Shelley, for affinity's sake, and was, in the lifelong fellowship with such men as the elder Dana, the literary mentor who is rriety of rhyme is in our speech possible only when, like Browning, one portrays the grotesque and the eccentric, or like Shelley the fantastic, or like Butler the comic, or like Chaucer the familiar. Such a mind would deduce Bryant's most fundamentminently the stuff of poetry, but unclarified, uncontrolled, unorganized. It is often as if the personalities of Byron, Shelley, Wordsworth, Moore, and Bryant had been merged into one helpless hypnoidal state of metrical and emotional garrulity. Y
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
deals of art. He used it with sombre and memorable detail, as a background for mental or social ills. It is characteristic of Brown that, while two of his notable romances recall his most vivid personal experience, all four of them wear the colours of Caleb Williams. From Godwin, Brown had his favourite subject, virtue in distress, and his favourite set of characters, a patron and a client. Perhaps he comes nearest to his master in Ormond. Constantia Dudley won the passionate regard of Shelley, to whom she was the type of virtuous humanity oppressed by evil customs. She is Brown's picture of feminine perfection, learned, self-reliant, pure, priggish. Ormond is quite clearly the child of romance and revolution, a hero who is a villain, a creature of nature who is the master of many destinies, a free will which must act as the agent of inevitable malice. All this seems pure Godwin, but it has a certain spirit of youth and ardour which Godwin lacked. In Arthur Mervyn the hero ha
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
, at the end of that century, it finally collapsed, the revolution which in reality had long been in preparation took on an abrupt and miraculous appearance. Heaven smiles, and faiths and empires gleam Like wrecks of a dissolving dream, cried Shelley, attempting to describe this remarkable period, and his lines are scarcely an exaggeration. Smiles and wrecks, these were the characteristic products of the time, blasted institutions and blossoming ideals. What those ideals were — some of tMan is born free; and is everywhere in chains. When Thoreau proclaims an intention to brag as lustily as chanticleer in the morning, standing on his roost, if only to wake my neighbours up, we feel that here is the homely New England version of Shelley's cry to the West Wind: Be through my lips to unawakened earth The trumpet of a prophecy! When Thoreau, on another occasion, writes that he was not aware that the capacity to hear the woodpecker had slumbered within me so long, the words
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
223 n. Select Charters, 125 n., 130 n., 134 n., 135 n., 141 n. Selected prose (N. P. Willis), 243 n. Self, 230 Self-Reliance, 336, 352 Sella, 263 n., 273, 281 Seneca, 116 Seneca Lake, 279 Sentiments of a British American, 127 Sertorius, the Roman patriot, 224 Seventy-six, 309 Sewall, Samuel, 48, 54 Shaftesbury, 93, 102, 109, I16 Shakespeare, 4, 12, 110, 112, 118, 211, 265 Sharpe, Colonel, 224 She would be a soldier, 220, 226 Shelburne, Lord, 91 Shelley, 261, 268, 274, 279, 290, 326, 346 Shenstone, 176, 178, 178 n. Shepard, Rev., Thomas, 153 Sheppard Lee, 311 Sherman, Roger, 148 Sherman, General W. T., 317 Shipley, Bishop, 91 Shippen, Joseph, 122 Shirley, Governor, 106 Sidney, Algernon, 105, i18 Sievers, 275 Sigismund of Transylvania, 18 Sigurd the Volsung, 261 Silence Dogood, 94, 113 Silsbee, Joshua, 227 Simms, W. G., 224 n., 231, 307, 308, 312-318, 319, 324 Simonides, 359 Simple Cobbler of
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
Campbell and Falconer, i vol. Chatterton, I vol. Chaucer, 3 vols. Churchill, Parnell, and Tickell, 2 vols. Coleridge and Keats, 2 vols. Cowper, 2 vols. Dryden, 2 vols. Gay, I vol Goldsmith and Gray, I vol. Herbert and Vaughan, I vol. Herrick, I vol. Hood, 2 vols. Milton and Marvell, 2 vols. Montgomery, 2 vols. Moore, 3 vols. Pope and Collins, 2 vols. Prior, i vol. Scott, 5 vols. Shakespeare and Jonson, I vol. Chatterton, I vol. Shelley, 2 vols. Skelton and Donne, 2 vols. Southey, 5 vols. Spenser, 3 vols. Swift, 2 vols. Thomson, I vol. Watts and White, i vol. Wordsworth, 3 vols. Wyatt and Surrey, I vol. Young, i vol. John Brown, M. D. Spare Hours. 3 vols. 16mo, each $1.50. Robert Browning. Poems and Dramas, etc. 14 vols. $19.500. Complete Works. New Edition. 7 vols. (in Press.) Wm. C. Bryant. Translation of Homer. The Iliad. 2 vols. royal 8vo, $9.00. Crown 8vo, $4.50. 1 vol
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
people were subject to somnambulism and general frenzy; vast conspiracies were organized with petty aims and smaller results. Brown's books, published between 1798 and 1801, made their way across the ocean with a promptness that now seems inexplicable; they represented American literature to England. Mrs. Shel. ley in her novel of The last man founds her whole description of an epidemic, which nearly destroys the human race, on the masterly delineations of the author of Arthur Mervyn. Shelley himself recognized his obligations to Brown; and it is to be remembered that Brown himself was evidently familiar with Godwin's philosophical writings and with Caleb Williams, and that he may have drawn from Mary Wollstonecraft his advanced views as to the rights and education of women, a subject on which his first book, Alcuin, provided the earliest American protest. Undoubtedly his tales furnished a point of transition from Mrs. Radcliffe, of whom he disapproved, to the modern novel of r
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 7: the Concord group (search)
n it came to passing judgment on the details of poetry, he was sometimes whimsical; his personal favorites were apt to be swans, and, on the other hand, there were whole classes of great writers whom he hardly recognized at all. This was true of Shelley, for example, about whom he wrote though uniformly a poetic mind, he is never a poet. About prose writers his estimate was a shade more trustworthy, yet he probably never quite appreciated Hawthorne, and certainly discouraged young people from eamy, as she indeed was, then and always. When I passed, Hawthorne lifted upon me his great gray eyes, with a look too keen to seem indifferent, too shy to be sympathetic — and that was all. But it comes back to memory like that one glimpse of Shelley which Browning describes, and which he likens to the day when he found an eagle's feather. It is surprising to be asked whether Hawthorne was not physically very small. It seems at the moment utterly inconceivable that he could have been any
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 8: the Southern influence---Whitman (search)
epresenting the Southern mind, though he was born in Boston; but in reality the only Southern poet of leading quality was Sidney Lanier. Emerson said unjustly of Shelley, that although uniformly a poetic mind, he was never a poet. As to all the Southern-born poets of this country except Lanier, even as to Hayne and Timrod, the qhan are to be found anywhere else in his works. That he could criticise profoundly one much nearer to himself than Whitman is plain when Lanier comes to speak of Shelley, of whom he has a sentence that seems to be another shot in the bull's-eye of the target. He says:-- In truth, Shelley appears always to have labored under Shelley appears always to have labored under an essential immaturity; it is very possible that if he had lived a hundred years he would never have become a man; he was penetrated with modern ideas, but penetrated as a boy would be; crudely, overmuch, and with a constant tendency to the extravagant and illogical,--so I call him the Modern Boy. It remains to be said that i
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