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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
s somewhat excited by John Randolph in the House; but in the main I was rather dreary and homesick. April 25.—Yesterday we had quite a pleasant time at Menou's. French Minister. He has bought a small cottage, and after nearly rebuilding it and fitting it altogether in French style, he has made it a pretty little snug place for a bachelor. Mr. Webster dined there, General Van Rensselaer, M. de St. Andre, Prince Lieven, my old classmate Hunt, See ante, p. 7. Judge Johnstone, and General Stewart of Baltimore. We had a nice little dinner in the library, and a nice little time altogether. Afterwards William and I spent an hour with General Van Rensselaer, at the Livingstons, Mr. Edward Livingston and his family. See ante, pp. 350, 351. very gayly. All Washington looks rather trite to me. The divisions of party have infected social intercourse. . . . . The whole thing is much less gay and amusing than it was when we were here together. I have been very happy in my visit
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
a fair exchange, and if his guest had anything to say, he was sure to have an opportunity. Miss Edgeworth wrote, in 1835, After a visit made by Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor at Edgeworthtown. to a friend of Mr. Ticknor, thus:— I have been acquainted, and I may say intimately, with some of the most distinguished literary persons in Great Britain, France, and Switzerland, and have seen and heard all those distinguished for conversational talents; Talleyrand, Dumont, Mackintosh, Romilly, Dugald Stewart, Erskine, Sir Walter Scott, Sydney Smith, and Mr. Sharpe, the fashionable dinner-lions of London. I have passed days in the country-houses and in the domestic intimacy of some of them, and after all, I can, with strict truth, assure you, that Mr. Ticknor's conversation appeared to me fully on an equality with the most admired, in happy, apposite readiness of recollection and application of knowledge, in stores of anecdote, and in ease in producing them, and in depth of reflection not in
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
113. Stackelberg, Count, 460. Stael, Baron Auguste de, 128, 138, 139, 151, 155, 312; letter from, 313; writings, 314 and note. Stael, Mad. de, work on Germany, 11, 98; opinion of Lady Davy, 57; work on England, 60, 61, 119, 126-130, 132, 133, 136, 138; death of, 151, 189, 213, 430; anecdote of, 497, 498. Stanley, Hon. Edward (Earl of Derby), 408 note. Stanley, Hon. Mr., 424. Stapfer, P. A., 130. Steinla, Moritz, 490. Stephens, Mr., 248. Sternberg, Baron, Ungern, 460, 483. Stewart, General, 381. Stolberg, Countess, 125. Stolberg, Leopold, 125. Story, Judge, Joseph, 40, 316 note, 339, 340, 361; letter to, 392. Stroganoff, Count, 462, 464, 465, 468, 491. Stroganoff, Countess, 462, 486, 487. Stuart, Lady, Dudley, 446 and note. See Bonaparte, Christine. Stuart, Lord, Dudley, 446 and note. Subaltern, by Gleig, 380. Sullivan, Richard, 12. Sullivan, William, G. T. studies law with, 9, 11, 12, 20, 40, 381. Switzerland, visits, 152-160. T Tagus River,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
Graham, Sir William and Lady Hamilton, Wilson, and two or three others. Lord Fullerton's wife is a beautiful woman, and so is his eldest daughter; and the dinner was pleasant. The person I was most curious about was Wilson, the successor of Dugald Stewart, and the editor of Blackwood. He answered much to the idea given of him among the roisterers of the Noctes Ambrosianae. He is a stout, coarse, red-faced person, with a great deal of red, bushy hair flying about his face and shoulders, takin the way here, and was so twenty years ago. April 28.—Our friend Mrs. Alison, Who had been at Edgeworthtown in 1835. . . . . whom we have seen frequently since we have been in Edinburgh, invited us to go with her this forenoon to see Mrs. Dugald Stewart, who lives quite retired near Leith. We found her much broken, but still as lady-like and gentle as ever, and with one of those beautiful faces of old age whose beauty consists in their moral expression. Her very intelligent and excellen
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Miss, II. 357. Steinla, Moritz, I. 490. Stephen, James (Sir J.), II. 180 and note. Stephens, John L., II. 201, 202. Stephens, Mr., I. 248. Stephenson, George, II. 149. Sternberg, Baron, Ungern, I. 460, 483. Steuber, II. 6. Stewart, General, I. 381. Stewart, Mrs., Dugald, II. 164. Stilrz, of St. Florian, II. 25, 26, 27. Stirling, William Sir William Stirling Maxwell), II. 271, 322, 323, 363, 364, 365, 368, 309, 378. Stockmar, Baron, II. 179. Stokes, .11. 176. StStewart, Mrs., Dugald, II. 164. Stilrz, of St. Florian, II. 25, 26, 27. Stirling, William Sir William Stirling Maxwell), II. 271, 322, 323, 363, 364, 365, 368, 309, 378. Stockmar, Baron, II. 179. Stokes, .11. 176. Stolberg, Countess, I. 125. Stolberg, Leopold, T. 125. Storey, C. W., II 445 note. Story, Joseph, Judge, T. 40, 316 note, 339, 340, 361; letter to, 392. Strauss, J., II. 5. Stroganoff, Count, I. 462, 464, 465, 468, 491. Stroganoff. Countess, I. 462, 486, 487. Strutt, Hon J. W., II. 482. Stuart, Abbe, II. 80, 82. Stuart de Rothesay, Lord, II. 64. Stuart, Lady, Dudley, I. 446 and note. See Bonaparte, Christine. Stuart, Lord, Dudley, I. 446 and note. Sturgis, II. P.,
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