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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
and seven guns. Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Drayton, with headquarters at Beaufort, commanded the defenses at Port Royal harbor and vicinity. He removed his headquarters to Hilton Head on the 5th, and pushed forward every preparation in his power for the impending battle. The remote position of Fort Beauregard and the interposition of the fleet, lying just out of range, made it impossible to reinforce that point. An attempt made early on the morning of the 7th, supported by the gallant Commodore Tattnall, was prevented by the actual intervention of the leading battleships of the enemy. Fort Walker, however, received just before the engagement, a reinforcement of the Fifteenth volunteers, Colonel DeSaussure, 650 strong; Captain Read's battery of two 12-pounder howitzers, 500 men and 450 Georgia infantry, under Capt. T. J. Berry. The morning of the 7th of November was a still, clear, beautiful morning, not a ripple, wrote General Drayton, upon the broad expanse of water to disturb t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
ty was aboard the Lady Davis, a small gunboat in Charleston harbor. Subsequently he was transferred to the Confederate States navy and ordered on duty with Commodore Tattnall's squadron at Savannah. He was on board the gunboat Resolute until the capture of Fort Pulaski, when he was ordered to report to Capt. J. N. Maffitt, at Wilieutenant, and entered the Confederate States navy as first lieutenant. Toward the latter part of the war he became lieutenant-commander. He served under Commodore Tattnall at Savannah, was an officer on the ironclad Palmetto State, at Charleston, and participated in the attack on the Federal fleet off Charleston bar, made by Cntress between Charleston and Savannah. He was then for several months with a river battery near Savannah, after which he was transferred to the Sampson of Commodore Tattnall's fleet, and later to the Huntress. Just before the capture of New Orleans he was ordered there to serve upon an ironclad, but was unable to reach the city
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
attles of the 8th and 9th of March, Buchanan was relieved, in consequence of his wound, by Commodore Tattnall, who assumed command of the naval defences of the waters of Virginia on the 29th. His fleed by the Quartermaster's Department, were still lying between Newport News and Hampton Bar. By Tattnall's direction the Jamestown and Raleigh steamed across, captured the vessels, and brought them ovo reconcile the statements of the two opposing commanders, in regard to the events of this day. Tattnall says: We passed the battery and stood directly for the enemy for the purpose of engaging him, aed over her. The Virginia was then placed at her moorings near Sewall's Point. On the 10th, Tattnall learned that the fort at Sewall's Point had been abandoned, and that the United States troops, Jamestown Flats, the point to which McClellan's army was supposed to have occupied the river. Tattnall thereupon concluded to destroy his ship; and, setting her on fire, he landed his officers and
tenant Joseph B., 61 South Carolina, the, at Pensacola, 35; at Galveston, 35, 140 Southfield, the, sunk, 93 Steamers, disposition at commencement of war, 14; purchases of, 17 et seq., 20 et seq. Stonewall, the, 221 Stripling, Commodore Cornelius K., 123 Stringham, Commodore, appointed to command of Atlantic squadron, 82, 83 et seq., 90 Sumter, the, 172 et seq.; sold 176; damage done by, 176 Tahoma, the, 124 et seq. Tallahassee, the, career of, 237 et seq. Tattnall, Commodore, assumes command of naval defences of Virginia, 76; sinks Merrimac. 78 Texas, blockade and coast of, 46 Torpedoes, invention and early history of, 3 et seq. Tredegar Iron Works, 22, 54 Trent, the, 177 et seq. Tuscaloosa, the, 199 et seq. Union, the, blockades Savannah, 85 Vanderbilt, the, 77, 203 et seq. Vincennes, the, 128, 130 et seq. Wachusett, the, captures the Florida, 188, 202 Ward, Commodore, Jas. H., 85 et seq.; killed, 88 Water Witch, the, 122, 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ttle of the 9th of March, the Merrimac went into dock to replace the prow, or ram, which had been lost in sinking the Cumberland, to exchange some of her guns, and to make some small repairs to her armor and machinery. On the 11th of April Commodore Tattnall, who had succeeded Commodore Buchanan in the command, went down with his entire squadron, consisting of the Merrimac, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, Teaser, Beaufort and Raleigh, to offer battle to the Federal fleet then lying in Hampton Roads, deral fleet lying in the same position below Old Point. Towards sunset of the first day the Merrimac fired a single gun at the enemy; it was immediately replied to by the Naugatuck, lying, I think, inside Hampton Bar. I do not know what Commodore Tattnall thought about attacking the Federal fleet as it stood, nor do I know what his instructions were, but I do know that our officers generally believed that torpedoes had been placed in the channel between Old Point and the Rip-Raps; indeed, we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
ttle of the 9th of March, the Merrimac went into dock to replace the prow, or ram, which had been lost in sinking the Cumberland, to exchange some of her guns, and to make some small repairs to her armor and machinery. On the 11th of April Commodore Tattnall, who had succeeded Commodore Buchanan in the command, went down with his entire squadron, consisting of the Merrimac, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, Teaser, Beaufort and Raleigh, to offer battle to the Federal fleet then lying in Hampton Roads, deral fleet lying in the same position below Old Point. Towards sunset of the first day the Merrimac fired a single gun at the enemy; it was immediately replied to by the Naugatuck, lying, I think, inside Hampton Bar. I do not know what Commodore Tattnall thought about attacking the Federal fleet as it stood, nor do I know what his instructions were, but I do know that our officers generally believed that torpedoes had been placed in the channel between Old Point and the Rip-Raps; indeed, we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and the Monitor—Report of the Committee on Naval Affairs. (search)
onal examination of the ship. The effect of the Monitor's guns upon the Merrimac was terrible. Her plated sides were broken in, the iron plating rent and broken, the massive timbers of her sides crushed, and the officers themselves stated that she could not have withstood the effect of the Monitor's guns any longer, and that they barely escaped in time from her. The Merrimac lay in dry-dock, repairing and strengthening, for six weeks, when she was again put afloat under the command of Admiral Tattnall. After the Merrimac was repaired and came out of dock the only thing she did was to form part of an expedition to go out into the Roads to attempt to capture the Monitor. The expedition was made up of the Merrimac and two tugs, manned by thirty volunteers on each tug-boat. They were all armed and provided with iron wedges and top mauls and tar balls. The plan was to board her, a tug on each side landing the men, and throwing lighted tar balls down through the ventilators and wedg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate steamship Patrick Henry. (search)
he fire that the Virginia was then undergoing from the Monitor and the Minnesota, but if her propeller was disabled it was necessary to attempt to tow her back to the cover of the Confederate batteries. So the Patrick Henry and Jamestown started to make the attempt, but they had gone only a short distance when the Virginia was seen to move and her propeller to turn, showing that she required no assistance. That evening all the Confederate vessels went into the harbor of Norfolk. Flag-Officer Tattnall having relieved Flag Officer Buchanan, who had been seriously wounded in the first day's fight in Hampton Roads, and all the vessels having been refitted, on the 13th of April the squadron again sallied out to meet the enemy. In case the Virginia should not be able to capture or destroy the Monitor, the gunboats Beaufort and Raleigh and two small steamers were assigned the duty of carrying the Monitor by boarding. One of these small steamers was the tender of the Norfolk navy yar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
ton, Acting Provost-Marshal General, are, I believe, all dead. Quartermaster-General Alexander R. Lawton, now verging upon seventy, represents the United States at the Austrian court. Rufus R. Rhodes, Commissioner of Patents, is thought to be no longer among the living. Turning to the Navy Department, we find upon the death-roll the names of Secretary Stephen R. Mallory, of Commodore F. Forrest, Chief of the Bureau of Orders, of Admirals Franklin Buchanan and Raphael Semmes, of Commodores Tattnall, Maury, Whittle, Hollins, Ingraham, and of many other prominent officers. Postmaster-General John H. Reagan lives, and is a member of the National Legislature. Of the commissioners who represented the Confederacy abroad, James M. Mason and William L. Yancey, accredited to Great Britain, John Slidell, accredited to France, P. A. Rost, accredited to Spain, John T. Pickett, accredited to Mexico, Bishop Lynch, accredited to the States of the Church, and John Forsyth, Martin J. Crawf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia, or Merrimac: her real projector. (search)
owledge. If he has let him show it; for while public opinion said she would never float, no one save myself knew to the contrary or what she was capable of bearing. The time came when this knowledge would have been of service to the Confederacy. Norfolk had fallen, and the brave Tattnall sought to save the Virginia by taking her up the James—success depending upon her stability when lightened to a draft of eighteen feet. He applied to Constructor Porter for information. In Flag-officer Tattnall's triumphant defence will be found this statement [see Scharf's Confederate States Navy, p. 235]: To the constructor, Mr. Porter, I applied through Paymaster Semple, for information on the subject, who swears positively that he obtained the constructor's written report that the ship could be lightened to even seventeen feet, and would have stability to that draft in the James river. Now, whether Mr. Semple misunderstood Mr. Porter or not, there can be no doubt of the nature of
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