hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 9 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 622 results in 133 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
wonderful proportions, and at eighteen minutes past two P. M., the confederate flag was hauled down and a white flag displayed. A boat was then sent to Pulaski, and a surrender of the Fort was made. Col. Olmstead stated that it was impossible to hold out any longer, as the rifle shots were fast working their way into the magazines, and a goodly number of his guns were disabled, and he was therefore compelled to comply with General Hunter's demand; accordingly, the Seventh Connecticut, Colonel Terry, was thrown into the Fort, and the munitions of war, provisions, etc., were turned over to the credit of the Union. Union loss--one killed and one wounded slightly. Confederate loss--three wounded. Amputation necessary, and performed in each case. Prisoners, three hundred and eighty-five, including officers.--(Doc. 126.) The bill to emancipate slaves in the District of Columbia was passed by the House of Representatives of the United States. During the debate upon it, John J. Cr
the Department of Virginia, to Major-General J. G. Foster.--General Heckman returned to his quarters at Morehead City, N. C., having been absent four days on a reconnaissance toward Swansboro. The objects of the expedition were fully accomplished without casualty.--Jackson, Miss., was evacuated by the rebels.--(Doc. 98.) The steamboat Imperial arrived at New Orleans, La., from St. Louis, Mo., the first boat, between the cities for more than two years.--the rebels made an attack on General Terry's brigade on James Island, S. C., but were repulsed. The monitors and mortar-boats kept up an al. most constant fire upon Fort Wagner all day, but most of them withdrew at night. A force of National troops visited the salt works, near St. Mark's, Florida, and succeeded in destroying them completely, besides carrying off fifteen slaves.--the rebel forces under General Morgan passed through Piketon, Ohio.--the Colored Convention of the State of New York, met at Poughkeepsie, and issu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Siege and capture of Fort Pulaski. (search)
ry, 1862, they were reenforced by the addition of the 7th Connecticut Infantry, two companies of New York Volunteer Engineers, and two companies of the 3d Rhode Island Artillery, and all were placed under command of Colonel (now Major-General) A. H. Terry, of the 7th Connecticut. By the labor of these troops eleven batteries were constructed, at distances from the fort varying from 1650 to 3400 yards. No. 1, 3 heavy 13-inch mortars3400 yards. No. 2, 3 heavy 13-inch mortars3200 yards. No John H. Gould), Lieut.-Col. William B. Barton. Bird Island (E, 3d R. 1. Artillery, Capt. James E. Bailey, and E, 1st N. Y. Engineers, Capt. James E. Place), Maj. Oliver T. Beard. Tybee Island, Acting Brig.-Gen. Q. A. Gillmore: 7th Conn., Col. Alfred H. Terry; 8th Mich., Col. William M. Fenton; 46th N. Y., Col. Rudolph Rosa; 1st N. Y. Engineers, (Co's A and D, Lieut. Thomas B. Brooks and Capt. Frederick E. Graef), Lieut.-Col. James F. Hall; B, F, and H, 3d R. I. Artillery, Capts. L. C. Tourtell
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The case of Fitz John Porter. (search)
and be forever disqualified from holding any office of trust or profit under the Government of the United States. On the 21st of January this sentence was approved by President Lincoln. During the next fifteen years General Porter continually applied for a rehearing, in the light of evidence newly discovered or not available at the time of his trial. On the 12th of April, 1878, President Hayes appointed a board of officers, consisting of Major-General John M. Schofield, Brigadier-General Alfred H. Terry, and Colonel George W. Getty, to examine the new evidence in connection with the old. The new evidence consisted largely of the testimony and the official reports of the Confederate officers serving in the Army of Northern Virginia at the second battle of Bull Run, supplemented by new and accurate maps.of the field of battle. None of this information, from the nature of the case, was, or could have been, before the courtmartial. By it, if established, an entirely new light
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
eries there, protect the column of boats in its advance across the stream, or cover its retreat in case of repulse. The entrance to Stono inlet was lighted up at night, and all transports bringing troops were ordered to enter after dark and leave before morning. All appearance of preparations for offensive operations was carefully suppressed, while upon General Israel Vogdes's defensive works on the south end of Folly Island a semblance of activity was conspicuously displayed. Brigadier-General A. H. Terry's division, about 4000 effective, and Brigadier-General George C. Strong's brigade, numbering about 2500, were quietly added to the Folly Island command under cover of darkness. The project for securing a lodgment on Morris Island comprised, as one of its features, a demonstration in force on James Island by way of Stono River, over the same ground where Brigadier-General Benham had met with repulse the year before. The object in the present case was to prevent the sending of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing land forces at Charleston, S. C. (search)
llard (w); 7th S. C. Battalion, Maj. J. H. Rion. Artillery, Lieut.-Col. J. C. Simkins (k): 63d Ga. (2 co's), Capts. J. T. Buckner and W. J. Dixon; 1st S. C. (2 co's), Capts. W. T. Tatom (k) and Warren Adams; S. C. Battery, Capt. W. L. De Pass. Total Confederate loss: killed and wounded, 174. Total force guarding fortifications around Charleston, about 8500. Total engaged at Battery Wagner, about 1000. Siege operations, August-September, 1863. Union.--Morris Island, Brig.-Gen. Alfred H. Terry. First Brigade, Col. Henry R. Guss: 9th Me., Lieut.-Col. Z. H. Robinson; 3d N. H., Capt. James F. Randlett; 4th N. H., Lieut.-Col. Louis Bell; 97th Pa., Maj. Galusha Pennypacker. Second Brigade, Col. Joshua B. Howell: 39th Ill., Col. Thomas O. Osborn; 62d Ohio, Col. F. B. Pond; 67th Ohio, Maj. Lewis Butler; 85th Pa., Maj. Edward Campbell. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas G. Stevenson: 7th Conn., Col. Joseph R. Hawley; 10th Conn., Maj. Edwin S. Greeley; 24th Mass., Col. Francis A
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From Gettysburg to the coming of Grant. (search)
Locust Grove. This movement was completed by daylight on the morning of the 28th of November. An angry skirmish-fire continued all (lay, and upon our part reconnoissances were made in various directions. On the evening of the 28th a council of war was called, and at this council it was decided that a flank movement to the left under the command of General Warren, who had proposed and advocated it, should be attempted. The troops assigned to this duty under Warren were his own corps, A. H. Terry's division of the Sixth, and 300 cavalry, reinforced later by the divisions of Prince and Carr of the Third Corps. It was generally understood that Warren's movement as a flank operation was to have been upon a much wider scale than it subsequently proved to be. It was thought that he was to make a circuit of perhaps several days' march, cutting Lee off from all communication, and coming in not so much upon his immediate flank as upon his line of communication and his rear, while Meade w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
M. Pennington; A, 4th U. S., Lieut. Rufus King, Jr.; C and E, 4th U. S., Lieut. Charles L. Fitzhugh. Second Brigade, Capt. Dunbar R. Ransom: E and G, 1st U. S., Lieut. Frank S. French; H and I, Capt. Alanson M. Randol; K, 1st U. S., Lieut. John Egan; A, 2d U. S., Lieut. Robert Clarke; G, 2d U. S., Lieut. William N. Dennison; C, F and K, 3d U. S., Lieut. James R. Kelly. Army of the James, Maj.-Gen. Benj. F. Butler. Tenth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore. first division, Brig.-Gen. Alfred H. Terry. First Brigade, Col. Joshua B. Howell: 39th Ill., Col. Thomas O. Osborn; 62d Ohio, Col. Francis B. Pond; 67th Ohio, Col. Alvin C. Voris: 85th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Edward Campbell; Second Brigade, Col. Joseph R. Hawley: 6th Conn., Lieut.-Col. Lorenzo Meeker; 7th Conn., Lieut.-Col. Daniel C. Rodman; 3d N. H., Lieut.-Col. Josiah I. Plimpton; 7th N. H., Col. Joseph C. Abbott. Third Brigade, Col. Harris M. Plaisted: 10th Conn., Col. John L. Otis; 11th Me., Lieut.-Col. Winslow P. Spofford;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.27 (search)
n with me at Drewry's Bluff, was also contained in a written circular delivered to each of them,--as it had been previously outlined to General Whiting,--so that none could be taken by surprise, no matter what movements might be executed the next day on the different parts of the field. General Ransom began his advance at a quarter to 5 o'clock A. M. [of the 16th of May], but was much retarded by a dense fog of several hours' duration. He had with him Gracie's brigade, Kemper's under Colonel Terry, Barton's under Colonel Fry, and Hoke's old brigade commanded by Colonel Lewis. At 6 o'clock A. M. he had carried the enemy's breastworks in his front, taking, it was claimed,--but this was afterward seriously contested,--several stand of colors and some five hundred prisoners. His troops had behaved with acknowledged gallantry, Gracie's and Kemper's commands having been mostly engaged, and the former having turned the enemy's right flank. But, for the purpose, it is alleged, of rees
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
m us three full broadsides of 9-inch solid shot, each broadside being eleven guns. They were well aimed and all struck, but when she was examined next day, no other indications were seen than scratches. The musketry fire into the two ports prevented the leveling of her guns, and therefore two of her shot or shell passed harmlessly over the Richmond, except the cutting of a ratline in the port main-shroud, just under the feet of the pilot, while the other whistled unpleasantly close to Lieutenant Terry's head. The Tennessee passed toward the Lackawanna, the next vessel astern, and avoided her — wishing either to ram Captain Strong's vessel (Monongahela), or cross his bow and attack McCann's vessel (the Kennebec, Strong's consort). Strong was ready for her, and, anticipating her object, made at her, but the blow (by the quick manoeuvring of the Tennessee) was a glancing one, doing very little damage to either Strong's or McCann's vessel. Thence the Tennessee, after firing two broadsi
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...