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of a skin not colored like their own. The same conviction animated the hearts of the people, whether at the North or South. Out of ample illustrations, I select one which specially reveals this conviction, and possesses a local interest in this community. It is a deed of manumission, made after our struggles had begun, and preserved in the Probate records of the County of Suffolk. Here it is: Know all men by these presents, that I, Jonathan Jackson, of Newburyport, in the county of Essex, gentleman, in consideration of the impropriety I feel, and have long felt, in beholding any person in constant bondage—more especially at a time when my country is so warmly contending for the liberty every man ought to enjoy—and having some time since promised my negro man, Pomp, that I would give him his freedom, and in further consideration of five shillings, paid me by said Pomp, I do hereby liberate, manumit, and set him free; and I do hereby remise and release unto said Pomp, all dema
of a skin not colored like their own. The same conviction animated the hearts of the people, whether at the North or South. Out of ample illustrations, I select one which specially reveals this conviction, and possesses a local interest in this community. It is a deed of manumission, made after our struggles had begun, and preserved in the Probate records of the County of Suffolk. Here it is: Know all men by these presents, that I, Jonathan Jackson, of Newburyport, in the county of Essex, gentleman, in consideration of the impropriety I feel, and have long felt, in beholding any person in constant bondage—more especially at a time when my country is so warmly contending for the liberty every man ought to enjoy—and having some time since promised my negro man, Pomp, that I would give him his freedom, and in further consideration of five shillings, paid me by said Pomp, I do hereby liberate, manumit, and set him free; and I do hereby remise and release unto said Pomp, all dema
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
there. From his peaceful labors in the Old Colony and its vicinity, at Lib. 5.2. the close of 1834, he had passed in January to Andover, where he had the ear of the theological and academical students; to Concord, Mass.; to various parts of Essex County, where the meeting-houses of Methodists, Baptists, Unitarians and Friends were opened to him. In the intervals of these excursions he spoke frequently in Boston. In February, accompanied by the Rev. Amos A. Phelps and by Henry Benson, he visiparticipating in the New England Anti-Slavery Convention in Boston, and, at the very close, holding in Julien Hall a debate Lib. 5.89. with Gurley on the subject of colonization. His June campaign was made in the already well-worked field of Essex County, and thither he was recalled in July by the presence of Gurley in Andover. Nowhere had the interest and excitement produced by Mr. Thompson's eloquence been more intense, or the struggle severer, than on this occasion. But, though backed by
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
the common law would serve the purpose, had been referred by the Massachusetts Legislature to a joint committee of five, of Account of the Interviews, etc.; Lib. 6.43, 46, 49; May's Recollections, pp. 185-202. which Senator George Lunt (from Essex County) was chairman. Before this committee, on the 4th of March, 1836, the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society was, on its own request, granted a hearing, less in self-exculpation than in order to defeat the Southern and pro-Southern design on a comy outworks. A New York Abolitionist, writing to the Lib. 6.141. Liberator, whom we can certainly identify with Lewis Tappan, saw in the Sabbath discussion the germ of animosity and contention among brethren. At the semiannual meeting of the Essex County Anti-Slavery Society Lib. 6.158. on September 15, a resolution of Charles Burleigh's, urging support of the Liberator, found Sabbatarian objectors, though the vote was finally unanimous. A week later, Mr. Garrison writes to Mr. May, from Bro
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
let, Slaveholding Weighed in the Balance of Lib. 7.80. Truth, and had in his speeches at anti-slavery meetings been remarkable for his hard language, Lib. 7.133; 8.10. out-Garrisoning Garrison. Towne was the pastor of the Salem-Street Congregational Church, succeeding the Rev. George W. Blagden, the chief opponent of the Free Church in the Ante, p. 105. Congregational council which recognized it; and his distinction had been the holding of a brief anti-slavery Lib. 7.133. agency in Essex County, prior to which, as the pastor of a church in Amesbury, he too had used noticeably strong Lib. 7.151. language on the guilt of slavery, and had advised favoring the anti-slavery charity as both the most needy and the most important. These gentlemen, now feeling the weight of the cause to be somehow resting on their shoulders, came forward, in the name of nine-tenths of the abolitionists, to unfold their budget of complaints against Mr. Garrison and the Liberator. Uniform precedents migh
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
A. S. Society, at Fitchburg. (See the proceedings in another column.) These Lib. 9.7. resolutions were concocted in Essex County, by the joint labors of two clergymen, and passed as above stated—only four or five hands, we learn, being raised in tiews at this period. The latter was speaking not only as an abolitionist, but as an agent. Worcester, Middlesex, and Essex Counties, everywhere strengthening the friends and discomfiting the enemies of the Liberator and the Board; and closed his ladispleased with us, and enable our clerical brother in Salem (C. T. T.), C. T. Torrey. Corresponding Secretary of the Essex County A. S. Society, to inform all the members of that association of the time of its regular meetings! The time has been wator, and its exigencies were not overlooked in the county society meetings. Thus, on June 13, at Topsfield, when the Essex County Society had baffled the final endeavor of its Secretary, Lib. 9.99, 106. Torrey, to commit it to the New Organizatio
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
ate, and elsewhere, are determined to go with their party at the approaching election; and they will not attend our meetings until after election, even if at all. This is not less humiliating than true. Besides this, new organization has benumbed the sensibilities and paralyzed the energies of very many who were once actively engaged in our cause. It is the worst foe that liberty has to contend with— the most dangerous form of pro-slavery. This morning I go to Methuen, to attend the Essex County Lib. 10.175. Convention. I expect we shall have to address bare walls; but, no matter. After all, believing that God is with us, we may confidently affirm that we are multitudinous as to number, and victorious as to principle. Abby Kelley will attend the meeting. She spoke eloquently and impressively at Springfield. She also addressed a public meeting of the Boston Lib. 10.171. Female Anti-Slavery Society, in the Melodeon, last Wednesday Oct. 14, 1840. evening. I was at Groton; b
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 11 (search)
so strong that they can prevent the same event befalling themselves when necessity requires. Hold on to that idea with true New England persistency,--the sacredness of individual man,--and everything else will evolve from it. The Phillipses, Mr. President, did not come from Plymouth; they made their longest stay at Andover. Let me tell you an Andover story. One day, a man went into a store there, and began telling about a fire. There had never been such a fire, he said, in the county of Essex. A man going by Deacon Pettingill's barn saw an owl on the ridge-pole. He fired at the owl, and the wadding some how or other, getting into the shingles, set the hay on fire, and it was all destroyed,--ten tons of hay, six head of cattle, the finest horse in the country, &c. The Deacon was nearly crazed by it. The men in the store began exclaiming and commenting upon it. What a loss! says one. Why, the Deacon will well-nigh break down under it, says another. And so they went on, specula
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The right of petition. (search)
heard in old Faneuil, and from the lips of those whose very names should have been a guaranty of their attachment to freedom, principles which would have blotted out every page of our past history. Borne down, but not dismayed,--confident that the hearts of the people, could the truth but reach them, were sound at the core,--we sought out the weapon which our fathers wielded; we besieged the doors of our State legislatures with petitions and remonstrances. I need not tell the county of Essex how that appeal was answered. Of that answer they have already taken note. There was one refuge left,--the government which our fathers established, to promote justice, and secure the blessings of liberty to themselves and their posterity. There, at least, we might hope to find men able to look behind circumstances to principles. Who does not recollect the astonishment — for the first feeling was rather astonishment than indignation -with which we heard that the door of the capitol was
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 6 (search)
en resident in Newburyport. With his aid I established a series of prizes for the best prose and poetry written by the young people of the town; and the first evidence given of the unusual talents of Harriet Prescott Spofford was in a very daring and original essay on Hamlet, written at sixteen, and gaining the first prize. I had also to do with the courses of lectures and concerts, and superintended the annual Floral Processions which were then a pretty feature of the Fourth of July in Essex County. On the whole, perhaps, I was as acceptable a citizen of the town as could be reasonably expected of one who had preached himself out of his pulpit. I supposed myself to have given up preaching forever, and recalled the experience of my ancestor, the Puritan divine, Francis Higginson, who, when he had left his church-living at Leicester, England, in 1620, continued to lecture to all comers. But a new sphere of reformatory action opened for me in an invitation to take charge of the Wo
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