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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
crossing the West Point railroad near Red Oak Station and moving in an easterly direction. About 11 a. m. the brigade was detached from the division, for the purpose of guarding the corps' trains, which were moving on a road to the right leading toward the Fayetteville pike, rejoining and camping with the division that night at — Church, southwest of Rough and Ready and four miles from the Macon railroad. At 8 a. m. August 31 marched with the division in an easterly direction, crossing Flint River at-- Mills, where, striking a by-road to the right and south of the main road, we moved in the direction of the Macon railroad, striking the same near Rough and Ready about 4 p. m. and assisted in its destruction. Near night-fall we took position, fronting south, on the right of the road, throwing up temporary works. Next morning at 7 a. m. marched with the division, following the main Jon esborough road to a point four miles from the town, when, leaving the road to the right, over by-r
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 93 (search)
this road the pickets of the Seventeenth Corps were found. One brigade of General Carlin's division was immediately pushed eastward on a reconnaissance. They advanced a mile, driving in the enemy's skirmishers and gaining possession of a ridge in their front with but small loss. The other brigade of this division was pushed forward and formed upon their right. General Morgan's division moved south upon the Jonesborough road, formed his lines to the east of the road and to the east of Flint River (which General Carlin had also crossed), and advancing began to feel for General Carlin's right. Meanwhile Captain Prescott's battery gained a commanding position, enfilading the enemy's lines and silencing a battery upon General Morgan's front. Connection was formed between General Morgan and General Carlin, and the lines of battle were formed. The lines of attack consisted of Carlin's two brigades and Morgan's entire division. The enemy was vigorously attacked and driven back severa
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 114 (search)
ine). These officers performed their duty with credit to themselves and to the service. The battalion lost on this day 4 killed, 12 wounded. After the battle of Jonesborough was terminated by the defeat and retreat of the enemy, the battalion was detailed on picket to cover the brigade front, from which duty it was relieved on the following morning, when it moved to Jonesborough and encamped. On 5th of September was detailed at 7 p. m. as guard for wagon train of Fifteenth Army Corps at Flint River. Was relieved on the next morning and returned to camp at Jonesborough; marched same day about I mile toward Atlanta, constructed works, and camped. On 7th of September moved within ten miles of Atlanta. On 8th camped about 4 p. m. about two miles from Atlanta. On 10th of September marched at sunset about one mile southwest of our former position, where the battalion is now in camp. The total loss of the battalion during the period covered by this report is 14 killed, 56 wounded,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 128 (search)
ent was withdrawn and a new position assigned to my command upon the right of General Carlin. My orders were to cross Flint River and gain a ridge to the left of that stream and form a line of battle facing near south, the Second and Third Brigadesed by a division of the Seventeenth Corps. Measures were immediately taken to place my command in position, moving to Flint River and crossing it. The enemy was soon discovered in a strong position on a ridge running nearly east and west, and two band a brisk artillery fire continued during the afternoon, Barnett's battery subsequently taking part. After crossing Flint River a bad swamp was encountered, across which bridges had to be constructed. Officers and men worked with a will, notwith the battle of Jonesborough. After several changes of orders, I was finally ordered by my corps commander to cross Flint River, and, with two brigades deployed, and one in reserve, take up a position that he then pointed out to me; not to be anx
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
about eight miles, halted for the night and intrenched just east of the Jonesborough road. August 31, the regiment relieved the Seventy-eighth Illinois Infantry on the skirmish line at 12 m. Matters seem quiet in our front, though heavy firing is heard to our right and front. At S p. m. the command moved to the right about two miles and bivouacked for the night. September 1, the regiment marched at sunrise, proceeding in a southeast course about eight miles, striking the headwaters of Flint River, two miles from Jonesborough, at 4 p. m.; crossed the river under a heavy fire from two rebel batteries, which resulted in no loss to the regiment, however. Remaining in this position one-half hour, or thereabouts, awaiting orders, the column moved by the left flank until it arrived at a point 600 yards north of the batteries which had been annoying us; here was formed the line of battle, the Sixteenth Illinois Infantry being on the right of the brigade, immediately in rear of the Fourte
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 144 (search)
ast day of August it was pretty generally conceded that the enemy would tender us battle as usual on their choice of ground and within their strong fortifications. On this last-named day we marched to and encamped for the night near Turtle Swamp, on the left of the Atlanta and Jonesborough road. On the following morning, early, we left this place, marched across to and down the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough road, toward the latter-named place, to a point about one-half mile south of Flint River. Here the brigade moved to the left in an open field and formed in order of battle as follows: First line, Twenty-second Indiana on the right, seven companies of the Fifty-second Ohio on the left, One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois in the center, with three companies of the Fifty-second Ohio deployed as skirmishers; second line, Eighty-fifth, Eighty-sixth, and One hundred and tenth Illinois. About 2 p. iM. the brigade moved by the right flank across a difficult slough and reformed it
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 149 (search)
ged and took enemy's works with loss of 1 commissioned officer wounded, 4 enlisted men killed, and 13 wounded. Remaining in position till llth, then moved three miles to right, camping till 20th, when marched to the right eight miles farther and broke the Montgomery railroad, the Twenty-second Regiment in front. Marched back, reoccupied same camp till 27th, when the army commenced moving to the Macon railroad. August 31, occupied and fortified Lick Skillet road. September 1, crossed Flint River at 12 m. and took position in front of enemy near Jonesborough. In afternoon participated in charge with Third Brigade; took rebel works, routing enemy, capturing a number of pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners. The Twenty-second lost in this battle 2 commissioned officers killed, 4 wounded; 3 enlisted men killed, 29 wounded, and 1 missing. On the 3d and 4th our brigade returned, in charge of 1,700 prisoners, to Atlanta, which had been occupied by our forces, the enemy surr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
aving heard trains of the enemy during the night moving south along our front, our skirmishers pushed out and at daybreak discovered them, although at a considerable distance, still moving in that direction. They were on a road to the east of Flint River. As soon as this was reported to me I sent forward a battery, supported by Colonel Walker's brigade, and opened a fire of shell upon the wagons, which compelled them to turn back and quit the road. A reconnoitering party from this brigade was then pushed forward about two miles, crossing Flint River, and until it reached the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough road near Smith's, and immediately after the entire division, with Colonel Mitchell's brigade, of the Second Division, ordered to report to me, were brought up and posted at this point. As soon as our troops had secured themselves in this position, about 4 p. m., I detailed Colonel Carlton's regiment, of the First Brigade, together with large parties from each of the other tw
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
aving heard trains of the enemy during the night moving south along our front, our skirmishers pushed out and at daybreak discovered them, although at a considerable distance, still moving in that direction. They were on a road to the east of Flint River. As soon as this was reported to me I sent forward a battery, supported by Colonel Walker's brigade, and opened a fire of shell upon the wagons, which compelled them to turn back and quit the road. A reconnoitering party from this brigade was then pushed forward about two miles, crossing Flint River, and until it reached the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough road near Smith's, and immediately after the entire division, with Colonel Mitchell's brigade, of the Second Division, ordered to report to me, were brought up and posted at this point. As soon as our troops had secured themselves in this position, about 4 p. m., I detailed Colonel Carlton's regiment, of the First Brigade, together with large parties from each of the other tw
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 155 (search)
sition; it opened fire upon the enemy's trains, causing much disorder amongst the wagons and driving them from the main road. About 7 a. m. I was visited by Major-General Sherman and Brigadier-General Baird, who ordered me to send one or two good regiments to the front to reconnoiter the [ground] or detect the position of the enemy; sent the Ninety-second Ohio, Colonel Fearing, supported by the Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Ward, with instructions to go boldly forward at least as far as the Flint River, unless met by an overwhelming force, in which case I would bring forward my entire brigade. These gallant commanders executed my orders with promptness, and in about one hour's time reported that they had gained the opposite bank of the stream, and were repairing a bridge which had been burned by the enemy, and that in one hour's time the artillery and trains could be crossed over. In the mean time our Third Brigade and Colonel Mitchell's brigade, of General Carlin's division, had m
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