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July 23. General Pope issued an order directing the generals in his command to seize all the horses, mules and stores within their lines, except such as were absolutely needed by the inhabitants, especially in Culpeper County, Va. He also issued an order for the arrest of all disloyal male citizens within the lines of his command. Those who were willing to take the oath of allegiance and provide security for its observance were permitted to remain at their homes. Those refusing to be so sworn would be sent South beyond the National pickets.--(Doc. 104.) A fight took place near Florida, Mo., between a company of Union cavalry under the command of Major Caldwell and Porter's band of rebel guerrillas, numbering three hundred, which resulted in the retreat of the Nationals with a loss of twenty-six killed, wounded and missing. A fight took place near the North Anna River, Va., between a body of Union troops under the command of Colonel Kilpatrick, and a force of the rebe
November 19. General Hampton and General Thomas L. Rosser returned to Fredericksburgh, Va., from a most successful expedition into Culpeper County. On Tuesday night last they crossed the Rapidan with detachments from Rosser's,Gordon's, and Young's brigades, all under the immediate command of General Rosser, for the purpose of ascertaining the position of the enemy on the other side. After marching all night over a desperate road, they succeeded, about daylight on Wednesday morning, in locating the pickets of the enemy. That being accomplished, General Rosser immediately ordered a charge, which was executed by his brigade in the most gallant style, driving the advance back upon the main body, which was encamped a short distance in the rear. Here the enemy had formed a line of defence; but, in defiance of a heavy fire poured into his command, General Rosser pressed forward, and soon drove the entire force (the Eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalry) through their encampment, and pur
January 5. The Fourth Virginia rebel cavalry surprised an infantry picket belonging to the army of the Potomac, at a point near Eldorado, Culpeper County, Virginia, and captured three of their number.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. by E. M. Law, Major-General, C. S. A. On the 2d of May, 1864, a group of officers stood at the Confederate signal station on Clark's Mountain, Virginia, south of the Rapidan, and examined closely through their field-glasses the position of the Federal army then lying north of the river in Culpeper county. The central figure of the group was the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, who had requested his corps and division commanders to meet him there. Though some demonstrations had been made in the direction of the upper fords, General Lee expressed the opinion that the Federal army would cross the river at Germanna or Ely's. Thirty-six hours later General Meade's army, General Grant, now commander-in-chief, being with it, commenced its march to the crossings indicated by General Lee. The Army of the Potomac, which had now commenced its march toward Richmond, was more powerful in numbers than at any previous period of the war. It con
ome sharp fighting, were withdrawn. On Monday morning the enemy appeared in heavy force, and the batteries of Hill's division were put in position and shelled their infantry. They retired the infantry, and bringing up a large number of batteries, threw a storm of shot and shell at us — we not replying. They must have exploded several thousand rounds, and in all, so well sheltered were we, our killed did not reach twenty. That evening Jackson's whole force moved up to Jefferson, in Culpeper County, Longstreet close to him. The enemy was completely deceived, and concluded that we had given the thing up. Now comes the great wonder. Starting up the bank of the river on Monday, the twenty-fifth, we marched through Amosville, in Rappahannock County — still further up, crossed the Rappahannock within ten miles of the Blue Ridge, marched across open fields, by strange country paths and comfortable homesteads, by a little town in Fauquier, called Orleans, on and on, as if we would ne
ome sharp fighting, were withdrawn. On Monday morning the enemy appeared in heavy force, and the batteries of Hill's division were put in position and shelled their infantry. They retired the infantry, and bringing up a large number of batteries, threw a storm of shot and shell at us — we not replying. They must have exploded several thousand rounds, and in all, so well sheltered were we, our killed did not reach twenty. That evening Jackson's whole force moved up to Jefferson, in Culpeper County, Longstreet close to him. The enemy was completely deceived, and concluded that we had given the thing up. Now comes the great wonder. Starting up the bank of the river on Monday, the twenty-fifth, we marched through Amosville, in Rappahannock County — still further up, crossed the Rappahannock within ten miles of the Blue Ridge, marched across open fields, by strange country paths and comfortable homesteads, by a little town in Fauquier, called Orleans, on and on, as if we would ne
, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the First brigade in the battle of Cedar Run, Culpeper County, on the ninth instant: The following regiments constitute the brigade: The Fifth, Second, Fourth, Thirty-third, aport of the operations of the Forty-second regiment Virginia volunteers in the recent engagements at Cedar Run, Culpeper County, Virginia, on the ninth August, 1862: About three o'clock P. M., the regiment, commanded by Major Henry Layne, in conjllery in this division in the fight of the ninth instant, at Mrs. Crittenden's farm, near Slaughter's Mountain, Culpeper County, Virginia. The battle was opened by the artillery of this division, which had been posted, as presently described, with ollowing as a report of the part my regiment took in the battle of the ninth instant, near Mitchell's Station, in Culpeper County, Virginia: In placing the brigade in line of battle, my regiment occupied the extreme right, connecting with the line
th of August, 1862, I crossed the Rapidan River, at Tobacco Creek Ford, with a portion of my brigade, consisting of the Sixth, Seventh, and Twelfth regiments of Virginia cavalry. Encountering the enemy's pickets between Stevensburg, in the County of Culpeper, and Brandy Station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, in force, a spirited attack by Colonel W. E. Jones, commanding First Virginia cavalry, was immediately made, driving in their outpost to their reserve. Heavy skirmishing on both sth of August, when, crossing the river at Summersville Ford, we advanced, under the orders of General Lee, against the forces of General Pope, which were occupying the whole country north of that river. The enemy fell back before us through Culpeper County; and we reached the north branch of the Rappahannock at the bridge where the Orange and Alexandria Railroad crosses it, on Thursday, the twenty-first of August. The artillery of the enemy here opened on us across the stream, indicating that
attle at that place, and a portion of it, as has been already stated, rendered valuable service in covering the march of Jackson to the enemy's rear. The horse artillery accompanied the infantry, and participated, with credit to itself, in the engagement. The nature of the country rendered it impossible for the cavalry to do more. When the enemy's infantry passed the Rappahannock at Kelley's Ford, his cavalry, under General Stoneman, also crossed in large force, and proceeded through Culpeper county towards Gordonsville, for the purpose of cutting the railroads to Richmond. General Stuart had nothing to oppose to this movement but two regiments of Brigadier-General W. H. F. Lee's brigade — the Ninth and Thirteenth Virginia cavalry. General Lee fell back before the overwhelming numbers of the enemy; and, after holding the railroad bridge over the Rapidan during the first of May, burned the bridge and retired to Gordonsville at night. The enemy avoided Gordonsville, and reached Lou
ossed the Rappahannock, and pressing its way with celerity and vigor toward Culpeper, captured three guns of the Confederate horse artillery. On the 22d, Buford encountered Stuart at Jack's shop, in Madison County, and a fierce engagement occupied the divisions of both Buford and Kilpatrick, with the result that Stuart withdrew across the Rapidan. In October, General Lee entered upon what is known as the Bristoe campaign, which aimed at turning the right flank of the Federal army in Culpeper County. To cover this movement, Stuart distributed his command over a wide extent of country and along the Rapidan. On the 10th, Stuart was ordered to make a reconnaissance toward Catlett's Station. He sent Lomax forward, who moved to Auburn, and there learned that the Federals were in force at Warrenton Junction. He further discovered that the entire Federal wagon train was parked in a position easy of access. It was most desirable that its commissary supplies should be so applied as to
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