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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 39 (search)
elieve a force of ours which held the first line. The regiment behaved well. Our loss in officers and men was severe. On the morning of the 16th of May, the enemy having again left our front, we marched through Resaca to a point one mile from Calhoun. On the 17th the Thirty-sixth Illinois was deployed as skirmishers and moved through Calhoun toward Adairsville. The skirmishing was very heavy, the enemy making a stubborn resistance. Before noon we lost I officer and 12 men; were relieved bCalhoun toward Adairsville. The skirmishing was very heavy, the enemy making a stubborn resistance. Before noon we lost I officer and 12 men; were relieved by the Eighty-eighth Illinois. At 5 p. m. of the same day, in accordance with orders from the brigade commander, the regiment was put into action and behaved with coolness and courage. The regiment again suffered severely in loss of officers and men. On the morning of the 18th of May the Thirty-sixth Illinois, in accordance with orders, started in line of march in the column for Kingston. Moved toward Dallas May 23; arrived near New Hope Church May 26. At this place we were under fire for el
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
the works abandoned by the rebels during the night, and at 10 a. m. stacked arms in Resaca. Crossed the Oostenaula River at 11 a. m., halted for dinner, and at 3 p. m. again marched, going into bivouac about three miles south of Resaca and near Calhoun Station. During the afternoon's march frequent halts became necessary by reason of constant skirmishing in the advance. This night the regiment was on picket. May 17, marched at 5 a, m., and during the morning passed through the town of Calhoun. During the day those regiments in the advance constantly skirmished with the enemy, and 3 p. m. the latter were found strongly posted about three miles north of the town of Adairsville. Our regiment, with others of the brigade, was ordered to attack them at once; did so, and was engaged until 6 p. m., when, ammunition being exhausted, the regiment moved to rear and bivouacked for the night. In the fight the regiment lost I commissioned officer wounded, 1 enlisted man killed, and 29 enli
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 43 (search)
nt which I have the honor to command in the campaign which has resulted in the capture from the enemy and occupation of Atlanta: On the 3d day of May, 1864, the regiment marched from Cleveland, Tenn., its effective strength being 18 officers and 261 men. Subsequently it assisted in the occupation of Rocky Face Ridge after the capture of that place by the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. May 14 and 15, it was engaged with the enemy at Resaca. May 17, skirmished from Calhoun, Ga., to Pleasant Hill; engaged at Pleasant Hill from 4 p. m. to 6 p. m. May 25, took position at New Hope Church, on left of Twentieth Army Corps; engaged constantly in skirmishing for eleven days. June 6 and 7, covered removal of hospital, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps. 18th, supported skirmish line at Mud Creek. 19th, skirmished on Noonday Creek, in front of Kenesaw Mountain, taking 12 prisoners. 27th, formed part of column of attack on enemy's works. July 9, marched to Roswell and for
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 46 (search)
we were behind works not any one was injured. Toward noon I relieved some troops on the right of Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery. I retained this position until the next morning, when the fact was developed that the enemy had left our front. During the engagement Lieut. Col. T. S. West was wounded. This devolved the command upon myself. The line of march was immediately taken up in pursuit of the retiring enemy. Passing through Resaca, we camped on the night of the 16th near Calhoun, through which town we passed the next morning. Toward noon I relieved the Thirtieth Illinois in support of the skirmish line. The skirmishers advanced without any aid from me of any moment until within a few miles of Adairsville, Ga. Here the enemy displayed so strong a force that Colonel Barrett, commanding the skirmish line, requested me to deploy three companies on the right of the road to assist his line. In accordance with the request, I deployed Companies A, F, and D, under comman
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
t we changed our lines to connect with General Wood's line, and fortified. May 16, advanced at 6 a. m. and took possession of the enemy's works, and at 8 a. m. marched for Resaca. Reached there at 10 a. m., and halted three hours to repair the bridge over the Oostenaula, partially burned by the enemy. Continued the march in afternoon with heavy skirmishing, having the Twentyseventh and Forty-second Illinois in the skirmish line, supported by Third Kentucky and Sixty-fourth Ohio. Reached Calhoun at 6 p. m. and camped. Marched at 6 a. m. of the 17th and reached neighborhood of Adairsville at 4 p. m., formed line of battle on left of division, and bivouacked in same order at dark. Left camp at 6 a. m. of the 18th instant in advance, the Twenty-second Illinois as skirmishers. Reached Adairsville at 10 a. m., and halted until noon. Marched down the railroad about six miles and camped. May 19, marched at 7 a. m. and reached Kingston at noon. Halted two hours, when we marched out an
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
here we engaged him in the afternoon of the 14th, relieving the Third Kentucky Regiment and holding our ground for one hour, when we were relieved to replenish our ammunition. Our loss in this short engagement was 3 officers severely wounded, 2 of them mortally, and 7 enlisted men killed and 24 wounded. On the 16th we were the second regiment to cross the Oostenaula River, and again placed upon the skirmish lihe, which resulted in a loss of 2 enlisted men killed and 1 wounded. We occupied Calhoun that night, from which time to the 26th nothing of note occurred, at which time we arrived in front of New Hope Church, where the enemy had posted himself in a very strong position, and for the following ten or twelve days our duty was constant and dangerous, being under fire all of the time, and having one or two men wounded every day. On the 3d day of June Lieutenant-Colonel Swain was wounded, and the command of the — regiment then devolved upon Capt. J. W. Richards. On the 10th the vete
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
rely wounded), to the 8th day of September, 1864, when it went into camp near Atlanta, Ga., at the close of the summer's campaign: May 15, the regiment having been heavily engaged yesterday, retired to a commanding position in rear of the front line, and threw up strong earth-works. May 16, the enemy evacuated during the night. The One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at daylight, passed through Resaca at 9.30 a. m.. pressed the enemy closely, and bivouacked at dark near Calhoun. May 17, recommenced pursuit at 7.30 a. m., and moved forward rapidly till 5 p. m., when a brisk skirmish ensued with the enemy's rear guard, which lasted till after dark. May 18, marched at 9 a. m. one mile to Adairsville, rested till 1 p. m., marched three miles toward Kingston, and bivouacked, the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers having captured 4 prisoners during the day. May 19, marched two and a half miles beyond Kingston, encountered the enemy in force, and rested on ar
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
emy had been forced. The many small-arms and other articles of military use abandoned showed that his retreat was precipitate. The casualties of the command from the opening of the campaign to the evacuation of Resaca were: Killed, 81; wounded, 348; total, 429. Pursuit was made early the morning of the 16th, and during the day the whole of the Fourth Corps passed the Oostenaula (having repaired for this purpose a part of the partially destroyed bridge), and encamped for the night near Calhoun. The pursuit was resumed early the morning of the 17th. My division moved along the railway. Throughout the march a continued skirmish was kept up with the parties covering the enemy's rear, but these were rapidly driven before the steady and solid advance of the skirmish line of the division. At Adairsville, however, the enemy was met in heavy force; indeed it was subsequently learned that his entire army was assembled there. My division had advanced on the western side of Oothkaloga
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
ely wounded in the arm and side by a rebel sharpshooter, and the command of the brigade was assumed by Col. William H. Gibson, Forty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteers. Our casualties at this point were: Killed, 15; wounded, 72; total, 87. On the 16th about 9 a. m. this brigade, leading the division, followed the enemy, passing through his abandoned works, crossing the Oostenaula River on the wagon bridge at Resaca Station, moving south along and on the line of the railroad, passing through Calhoun toward Adairsville, where, on the evening of the 17th, the enemy was met in considerable force, this brigade being put in position on the right of the railroad, its right resting on the same and connecting on the left with General Hazen's brigade, to meet a threatened flank movement of the enemy, but did not become engaged, the enemy having fallen back during the night. The brigade continued its march with the division along the line of the railroad, passing through Adairsville on the 18th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 64 (search)
dsomely repulsed and severely punished. On the morning of the 16th the enemy had disappeared from our front, and our skirmishers entered his main line of works, when it was found that he had crossed the Oostenaula River at Resaca Station, and burned the railroad bridge behind him. Our casualties here were as follows, viz: Killed, 4; wounded, 14. About 2 p. m. we crossed the Oostenaula River on the wagon bridge. Moving in a southerly direction, in line with the railroad, we passed through Calhoun toward Adairsville. On the afternoon of the 17th General Newton's division met the enemy in considerable force near Adairsville. We were formed on the right of General Hazen's brigade and threw up breastworks on the crest of a ridge. Our regiment was deployed as skirmishers about 200 yards in front, in which position we remained during the night. On the morning of the 18th, the enemy having retreated, we moved in a southerly direction, passing through Adairs---ville and Kingston on the
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