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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
taff of General Scott, and received in quick succession the brevets of major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel, for gallant and meritorious conduct at Vera Cruz, Molino del Rey and Chapultepec. In 1852 he was presented a sword by South Carolina in recognition of the honor his career had cast upon his native State. After this war he was a member of the board which prepared a system of artillery instruction for the army, and was in command of the armories at Harper's Ferry, Charleston and Pikesville, Md., with promotion to major of ordnance, until his resignation from the old army to follow his State in her effort for independence. He was commissioned colonel of artillery in the regular army of the Confederate States, in June, brigadier-general in the provisional service, and in October, 1861, major-general. In May, 1861, he was assigned to command of the department of Southern Virginia and North Carolina, with headquarters at Norfolk, and after the evacuation of Norfolk and Portsmou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
noble woman A. D. 1901. Before that time, however, the Maryland Legislature had given to the Association of the Maryland Line the old arsenal at Pikesville, in Baltimore county, nine miles from Baltimore, with a liberal annual appropriation. The governors of the association appointed a Board of Lady Visitors, with Mrs. Johnsg. Over two thousand people gathered to assist in the exercises. The members of the Maryland Line, including about eighty veterans from the Soldiers' Home, at Pikesville, formed a line at the main entrance of the cemetery and marched to the lot, headed by the Fifth Regiment Veteran Corps Band, under the leadership of W. H. Pindeomplete it, it was with other help finished and published. While thus engaged, he was entertained as a guest at the Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md., the superintendent being Sergeant Wm. H. Pope, of his company, A, First Maryland Regiment. Still being desirous to do full justice to the Maryland Confedera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument Dedicated. (search)
was the leading feature of Memorial Day at Baltimore, June 6. The Baltimore Sun says of it: The day was also the anniversary of the battle of Harrisonburg, where soldiers of the Maryland Line distinguished themselves. Mrs. Johnson's grave and the monument which now marks the spot were profusely decorated, red roses predominating. Over two thousand people gathered to assist in the exercises. The members of the Maryland Line, including about eighty veterans from the Soldiers' Home, at Pikesville, formed a line at the main entrance of the cemetery and marched to the lot, headed by the Fifth Regiment Veteran Corps Band, under the leadership of W. H. Pindell. Friends of the dead and members of the Daughters of the Confederacy had previously strewn flowers over all the graves. Capt. G. W. Booth presided at the exercises, and read this appreciative sketch of Mrs. Johnson's life: Again we are assembled in this beautiful city of the dead to testify our respect and veneration f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
tensively reproduced in other newspapers. They are unique and nothing to compare with them has ever appeared. Doubtless they will be published in a volume. Major Goldsborough was the author of The Maryland Line in the Confederate Army, published in 1869. About 1896 he partially rewrote this volume, but being unable to quite complete it, it was with other help finished and published. While thus engaged, he was entertained as a guest at the Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md., the superintendent being Sergeant Wm. H. Pope, of his company, A, First Maryland Regiment. Still being desirous to do full justice to the Maryland Confederates, he was at his death engaged in gathering materials for a third volume, which it is probable will ultimately appear. With this end in view he spent much of last summer with his brother, Charles E. Goldsborough at Hunterstown, Pa., near Gettysburg and the battlefield. No one but Major Goldsborough has ever attempted to chronic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
A Maryland Confederate. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, January 17, 1903.] Matchless for hard fighting and bravery. Recollections of Major James Breathed. By H. H. Matthews, Pikesville, Md., a Member of Breathed's Battery. So little is generally known of the early life and ancestry of Major James Breathed, the fearless, dashing artillery officer who commanded the celebrated battery which has always been known as Breathed's Battery, since the death of the immortal Pelham, on March 17th, 1863, at Kelly's Ford, Va., I thought the public would perhaps be gratified by a recital of his early life up to and after the Civil war. Please pardon the length of this letter, as I find it impossible to do him justice in a shorter one. Major James Breathed, of the Stuart Horse Artillery, Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, C. S. A., was the son of John Breathed and Ann MacGill Williams, of Hagerstown, Md. His ancestors came from England and the north of Ireland, and to Maryl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roll and roster of Pelham's, (search)
ieutenant, Francis H. Wigfall. Promoted to Major and Aide-de-Camp, Staff of General Joseph E. Johnston. First.Lieutenant, M. W. Henry. Killed at Sharpsburg, Md., Antietum, September 17, 1862. Second Lieutenant, J. William Cosgrove. Died near Mt. Ephraim, Montgomery county, Md., December 6, 1902, aged 69 years. Second Lieutenant, Edgar Hill. Second Lieutenant, M. A. Febry. Acted as Quartermaster and Commissary of the Battery. Died at Maryland Line Confederate Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md. Dr. William H. Murray, Assistant-Surgeon. Rev. George H. Zimmerman, Chaplain. Non-commissioned officers. Sergeant-Major of Battalion Stuart Horse Artillery, Elijah T. Russell. Promoted from Private in Breathed's Battery. Killed in Luray Valley, Va. Sergeant-Major, Battalion Stuart Horse Artillery, Town Dodson. Promoted from Private in Breathed's Battery. Orderly Sergeants, Stirling Murray and Z. F. Williams. Sergeant Murray was captured at Westminster, Md., June 29, 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First battle of Manassas. (search)
First Manassas, are: Captains Clapham Murray, his brother, and McHenry Howard, General John Gill, Col. Frank Markoe Major Jas. Wm. Lyon, Judge Daniel G. Wright, Lieutenants Charles B. Wise, Charles E. Grogan, David S. Briscoe. Thomas B. Mackall and Winfield Peters; Privates, J. McKenny White, Sommervel Sollers and J. Southgate Lemmon. Rev. Randolph H. McKim. D. D., is in Washington, D. C.; Lieut. Richard T. Gilmor and Private Henry F. Schliephake are at the Confederate Soldiers' Home, Pikesville, Md.; Captain Frank X Ward and Private Fred'k L. Pitts, are in Philadelphia, Pa., and Private Duncan M. Turner is in Leonardtown, Md. These are probably the only survivors. A broken shaft of marble in the Confederate burial plot, in Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, to Murray and his men, tells the sixty who gave up their lives in the Confederate struggle: about one fourth of the whole number mustered. The only Confederate monument at Gettysburg. The monument is the tribute of the M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
at Louisville, reunion, no record of service was given; was an enlisted man. Robert C. Foute, San Francisco, Cal.—Born in Tennessee; midshipman U. S. N.; lieutenant C. S. N.; served steamer Virginia, battle of Hampton Roads, steamer Georgia abroad and steamer Savannah. Arthur C. Freeman, New York City-Master's mate; served steamer Georgia and assisted in capture of U. S. steamer Water Witch. Marian C. Filberti, Charleston—Enlisted man; served on Charleston Station. W. B. Fort, Pikesville, N. C.—Clerk paymaster's department C. S. N.; served at Charleston, S. C., and in blockade service. Robert H. Fleming, Lynchburg, Va.—Midshipman C. S. N.; served on school-ship Patrick Henry. E. F. Gill, Radford, Va.—Born in Virginia; second assistant engineer C. S. N.; served in 6th Virginia Regiment; left army after battle of Malvern Hill; served on Richmond Station, Charleston Station, and in Semmes Naval Brigade. John Grimball, Charleston, S. C.—Midshipman U. S. N.; lieut
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Keysville Guards. (search)
lieutenant. Killed at battle of Mine Run; lieutenant-colonel of regiment. N. A. Bass, third lieutenant. Whereabouts not known. W. H. Gregory, first sergeant. Killed at battle of McDowell. J. H. Pettus, second sergeant. Wounded at Kernstown; living in Charlotte county. A. B. Crawford, third sergeant. Lost left arm at Sharpsburg; living in Charlotte county. H. G. Fore, fourth sergeant. Died in hospital in Highland county, Va. Mike Shellings, first corporal. Died at Pikesville, Md., Soldiers' Home. Joseph Robinson, second corporal. Died since the war. R. S. Ward, third corporal. Lost left arm at McDowell; living near Keysville, Va. P. A. Booth, fourth corporal. Killed at Brandy Station. John A. Tucker, company commissary. Living at Rocksboro, N. C. Privates. Anderson, C. B. Wounded and died. Ashworth, W. A. Dead. Ashworth, A. W. Wounded at Second Battle of Manassas: living in Lunenburg county. Atwell, Wm. Missing at battle of Laurel
Spanish, one the British, and the other the American flag.--They were detained a short time and then allowed to proceed. The fleet has determined to interfere with no more vessels until orders are received from Washington. later. Troops continue to pour in from all parts of the State. Half disciplined, as many of them are, they undergo rigid drills. It is estimated that 10,000 soldiers are now in and about the city. Three regiments are encamped at the Race Course, and two at Pikesville, three miles beyond. General Beauregard is very active, and is strengthening every position in the harbor and on the land. He has offers of regiments from Alabama and Georgia; but Carolinian are so eager to serve, that he declines any other aid. He says he can get 50,000 men from this State alone. At Columbia, every man from 16 to 60 is under arms. Ten companies from the State capital are now here, and more want to come. The impression prevails here, from good authority, t
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