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thers, James Hargreaves had invented the Spinning-Jenny in 1764; this was supplanted by the invention by Sir Richard Arkwright, in 1768, of a superior machine for spinning cotton thread. James Watt patented his Steam Engine in 1769, and his improvement, whereby a rotary motion was produced, in 1782; and its first application to cotton-spinning occurred in 1787, but it was many years in winning its way into general use. John Fitch's first success in steam navigation was achieved in 1786. Fulton's patents were granted in 1809-11, and claimed the simple means of adapting paddle-wheels to the axle of the crank of Watt's engine. whereby steam was applied to the propulsion of machinery admirably adapted to the fabrication of Cotton, secured the cultivators against all reasonable apprehension of a permanently glutted market. As the production was doubled, and even quadrupled, every few years, it would sometimes seem that the demand had been exceeded; and two or three great commercial co
ept. 19. when he was directed by Grant to move his entire force — which had been swelled by the arrival of Ross's division — to within four miles of Iuka, and there await the sound of Rosecrans's guns. Ross, in his advance, reported to him a dense smoke arising from the direction of Iuka; whence he inferred that Price was burning his stores and preparing to retreat. Next morning, hearing guns in his front, Ord moved rapidly into Iuka, but found no enemy there; Price having retreated on the Fulton road during the night. Ord, leaving Crock er's brigade to garrison Iuka, returned directly, by order, to Corinth; while Rosecrans — having first sent Stanley's division into Iuka and found it abandoned — turned on the trail of the Rebels, and followed until night; but found they had too much start to be overtaken. Hamilton reports that, in this affair of Iuka, not more than 2,800 men on our side were actually engaged, against a Rebel force of 11,000, holding a chosen and very strong pos
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 12 (search)
outh; but, as usual, Rosecrans had encountered difficulties in the confusion of roads, his head of column did not reach the vicinity of Iuka till 4 P. M. of the 19th, and then his troops were long drawn out on the single Jacinto road, leaving the Fulton road clear for Price's use. Price perceived his advantage, and attacked with vehemence the head of Rosecrans's column, Hamilton's division, beating it back, capturing a battery, and killing and disabling seven hundred and thirty-six men, so that when night closed in Rosecrans was driven to the defensive, and Price, perceiving his danger, deliberately withdrew by the Fulton road, and the next morning was gone. Although General Ord must have been within four or six miles of this battle, he did not hear a sound; and he or General Grant did not know of it till advised the next morning by a courier who had made a wide circuit to reach them. General Grant was much offended with General Rosecrans because of this affair, but in my experience
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 16: Atlanta campaign-battles about Kenesaw Mountain. June, 1864. (search)
thousand, whereas our entire loss was about twenty-five hundred, killed and wounded. While the battle was in progress at the centre, Schofield crossed Olley's Creek on the right, and gained a position threatening Johnston's line of retreat; and, to increase the effect, I ordered Stoneman's cavalry to proceed rapidly still farther to the right, to Sweetwater. Satisfied of the bloody cost of attacking intrenched lines, I at once thought of moving the whole army to the railroad at a point (Fulton) about ten miles below Marietta, or to the Chattahoochee River itself, a movement similar to the one afterward so successfully practised at Atlanta. All the orders were issued to bring forward supplies enough to fill our wagons, intending to strip the railroad back to Allatoona, and leave that place as our depot, to be covered as well as possible by Garrard's cavalry. General Thomas, as usual, shook his head, deeming it risky to leave the railroad; but something had to be done, and I had r
U. S.N., together with the ordnance steamers Great Western, and Judge Torrence, and naval supply steamer J. H. Dickey, was under way and steaming down the Mississippi for Memphis, seventy-six miles below. We pass Hatchie Landing, where we found some eight houses, besides the warehouse, three of the tenements being unoccupied, perhaps deserted. At one P. M., the ram Queen of the West appears in sight ascending, and passes up during the next ten minutes. In the mean time we pass the town of Fulton, which, like nearly all the small towns on landings along the Mississippi presents an antiquated appearance. Here we obtained a fine view of the entire fleet. It was a brilliant and imposing spectacle. The flag-ship Benton led off handsomely, followed by the Commodore's tug, Jessie, and two others, the Terror and Spiteful. Next came, at a respectful distance, four of the iron-clads, followed by the two ordnance and one supply steamer. Old Sol blazes out in all his glory, fast dispelling
n thousand men under Generals Grant and Ord, should move via Burnsville, and attack Price, while General Rosecrans would move with part of his corps via Jacinto, and attack the enemy on the flank, while the balance of his column would move on the Fulton road, and cut off his (Price's) retreat in case he should attempt it. With this understanding, on the morning of the eighteenth inst., our army was on the move. Generals Stanley's and Hamilton's divisions, under Gen. Rosecrans, amid a drenching tain any particular advantage, and our infantry being too far in the rear, at night it was deemed advisable to give up the pursuit, and our column, consisting of Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions, bivouacked about thirteen miles from Iuka on the Fulton road. At about eleven o'clock on the morning after the battle the advance of Gens. Grant and Ord's column reached Iuka, and halted in the town. Had they been but a few hours sooner, our victory would have been complete; for if Grant's fresh t
n thousand men under Generals Grant and Ord, should move via Burnsville, and attack Price, while General Rosecrans would move with part of his corps via Jacinto, and attack the enemy on the flank, while the balance of his column would move on the Fulton road, and cut off his (Price's) retreat in case he should attempt it. With this understanding, on the morning of the eighteenth inst., our army was on the move. Generals Stanley's and Hamilton's divisions, under Gen. Rosecrans, amid a drenching tain any particular advantage, and our infantry being too far in the rear, at night it was deemed advisable to give up the pursuit, and our column, consisting of Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions, bivouacked about thirteen miles from Iuka on the Fulton road. At about eleven o'clock on the morning after the battle the advance of Gens. Grant and Ord's column reached Iuka, and halted in the town. Had they been but a few hours sooner, our victory would have been complete; for if Grant's fresh t
Doc. 163.-the battle near Fulton, Mo. Fulton telegraph narrative. Fulton, Mo., July 29, 1862. on Sunday, July twenty-seventh, Col. Guitar, with parts of three companies, arrived in this city about five A. M., and after arranging matters here, started to Col. Porter's command, supposed to be at Brown's Spring, about teFulton, Mo., July 29, 1862. on Sunday, July twenty-seventh, Col. Guitar, with parts of three companies, arrived in this city about five A. M., and after arranging matters here, started to Col. Porter's command, supposed to be at Brown's Spring, about ten miles north of this city. He left here with two hundred men and two pieces of artillery, about eleven A. M., and arrived in the vicinity of the rebel camp about half-past 2 P. M. ; and as there was a thick underbrush, Col. Guitar had the cannon placed in position some four hundred yards from their camp, dismounted his cavalry n he got to the timber on the south side of the creek, left the State road and proceeded down the creek until he reached the intersection of the road leading from Fulton to Danville, where he was joined by Lieut. H. A. Spencer, of the Third Iowa cavalry, commanding a detachment that was sent out early in the morning, who was follo
els left town on Wednesday afternoon, taking with them about fifty bales of cotton, all the mules and horses they could find, and about as many negroes as they could force off, about sixty in all. They took the plantation teams to haul their cotton. Owing to the bad roads, they left fourteen bales of cotton between town and the mountain, and I understand they were compelled to leave much more further on, which they burned. The enemy came through Frankfort, to which place they came on the Fulton road. By this means they were enabled to get here without our having warning, as nobody dreamed of their coming that roundabout way. Nearly every person they met or saw they brought along with them. Some of them they compelled to walk thirty miles. When they arrived here they had one hundred citizens prisoners. These, together with the citizens they got in town, made a big show. No doubt the official report of the expedition will mention having captured one hundred and fifty prisoners, n
hidelphia about the thirty-first. General Cabell was ordered to join Marmaduke. The cavalry was in two divisions, one under Marmaduke, and one under Fagan. General Maxcy was ordered with all his force, except such as was needed to prevent small raids, to hold himself at Logansport, in the extreme south-east corner of Indian Territory, so as to support General Rice, and operate on his left should he be forced back by Steele. Steele's plan was, to move by Washington to Red River, cross near Fulton, and destroy the stores and shops at Jefferson and Marshall, taking us in rear, while we operated against Banks, or giving the latter an opportunity of cutting our communications should we move against Steele. Steele moved very slowly and cautiously, harassed by our cavalry, who impeded his march at every step. He was about sixteen days moving from Camden to Prairie d'ane, a distance of about one hundred miles. Our object was, to delay a general engagement until the two columns of the enem
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