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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 2 0 Browse Search
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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
aneytown. Fifth corps to Hanover. First corps to Gettysburg. Eleventh corps to Gettysburg, (or supporting distance.) Sixth corps to Manchester. Twelfth corps to Two Taverns. Cavalry to front, and flank well out in all directions, giving timely notice of operations and movements of the enemy. All empty wagons, surplus baggageect route can be found, leaving Taneytown to their left, to withdraw direct to Middleburg. General Slocum will assume command of the two corps at Hanover and Two Taverns and withdraw them via Union Mills, deploying one to the right and one to the left after crossing Pipe creek, connecting on the left with General Reynolds, and c it necessary for the commanding general to fight the enemy to-day, the troops are posted as follows for the support of Reynolds's command, viz: On his right at Two Taverns, the 12th corps; at Hanover, the 5th corps; the 2d corps is on the road between Taneytown and Gettysburg; the 3d corps is at Emmettsburg. This information is
ainted with the truth. Yet the facts in the case are very nearly the reverse of the above in every particular, and directly in contradiction to the facts, as set forth in the report of General Geary, as well as that of General Williams. Geary's division didn't march even in the direction of your left. Two of his brigades, under his immediate command, left the intrenchments under orders to move to the support of your left, but through some unfortunate mistake he took the road leading to Two Taverns. Williams' entire division did more to the support of your left, and it was one of his brigades (Lockwood's) under his immediate command, which you commend, but very singularly accredit to the First corps. Greene's brigade of the Second division remained in the intrenchments, and the failure of the enemy to gain entire possession of our works, was due entirely to the skill of General Greene, and the heroic valor of his troops. His brigade suffered severely, but maintained its positio
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 32: in pursuit of Lee. In camp at Morrisville. (search)
venth and Twelfth followed in the afternoon and on the morning of July 6 the southward march of the Second Corps began, by way of the Taneytown Road. As the regiment filed out of the field at Gettysburg it was halted and an order from the President was read, announcing the fall of Vicksburg. The news was received with cheers and the men marched on with lighter hearts, feeling that the year of 1863 promised some decisive results in the prosecution of the war. That night was spent at Two Taverns and on the 7th march was resumed to Taneytown. Frederick City was reached on the 8th, Burkittsville on the 9th, and at noon on the 10th of July the regiment arrived at Williamsport, where, after a few hours rest, the men were marched about two miles in the direction of Hagerstown, and formed in line to the right of the road to repel an expected attack of the enemy. It remained all night under arms and in the morning moved across the road toward Williamsport, forming on the left of the
Tuttle, F. W........................................................ 108 Tuttle, John....................................................... 293 Tuttle, Thomas..................................................... 104 Tuttle, Thomas W................................................... 2-48 Twentieth Massachusetts Regiment 2, 16, 22, 30, 38, 39, 115, 162, 171, 178, 184 202, 234, 294, 295, 298, 299, 300, 301, 327, 346 Twentieth New York Regiment...................................... 32 Two Taverns, Pa............................................ 255 Tyler, James............................................... 293 Tyler, Lieutenant............................................... 27 Upperville.............................................. 157 Urban, Henry. ................................... 292 Urbana....................................................... 127 VanAllan Cavalry.................................................... 32 VanAmmon, Bernard........................
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 24: the battle of Gettysburg begun (search)
me. What is it, orderly? I asked. Orders from army headquarters. I took the bundle of papers in my hand. The address was to Reynolds as the wing commander. To forestall the possibility of their loss between Emmittsburg and Marsh Run, I opened the dispatches, as was customary, read them, and sent them forward with a note. The orders were as follows: OrdersHeadquarters at Taneytown--Third Corps to Emmittsburg; Second Corps to Taneytown; Fifth Corps to Hanover; Twelfth Corps to Two Taverns; First Corps to Gettysburg; Eleventh Corps to Gettysburg (in supporting distance); Sixth Corps to Manchester; cavalry to front and flanks, well out in all directions, giving timely notice of positions and movements of the enemy. With these orders came a clear indication of Meade's opinion of the location of Hill and Longstreet, as between Chambersburg and Gettysburg, while Ewell was believed to be still occupying Carlisle and York. He closed his circular letter with these significan
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 9 (search)
rs running into the Chesapeake Bay, was selected as a favorable position, though its ultimate adoption was held contingent on developments that might arise. Accordingly, orders were issued on the night of the 30th for the movements of the different corps on the following day: the Sixth Corps, forming the right wing of the army, was ordered to Manchester in rear of Pipe Creek; headquarters and the Second Corps to Taneytown; the Twelfth and Fifth corps, forming the centre, were directed on Two Taverns and Hanover, somewhat in advance of Pipe Creek; while the left wing, formed of the First, Third, and Eleventh corps under General Reynolds, as it was closest to the line of march of the enemy, was thrown forward to Gettysburg, towards which, as it happened, Lee was then heading. Strategically, the position at Gettysburg was of supreme importance to Lee; for it was the first point in his eastward march across the South Mountain that gave command of direct lines of retreat towards the Po
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
that of Waynesboroa; finally, the last, passing by Littlestown, Two Taverns, and Gettysburg, crosses the mountains west of Cashtown and desclone has remained in the centre at Taneytown, is to march toward Two Taverns in order to connect Reynolds with the right, whilst the Second wto the general plan, had led the Twelfth corps from Taneytown to Two Taverns since morning. He had hardly reached this point, which is only e neighborhood of Heidlersburg, had been ordered to fall back on Two Taverns; Gregg, who was at Westminster with his division, had left Huey'rty men. They will arrive toward three o'clock in the morning at Two Taverns, whence they will go and take the position on the extreme left wof artillery. Pleasonton's orders are to wait for Kilpatrick at Two Taverns. He will send back Custer to the right in order to form a junct house. Although he has been ordered by Kilpatrick to repair to Two Taverns, Custer complies with Gregg's request. Stuart thus has three br
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the editor (search)
nion Mills, via Hanover and McSllerrystown, to Bonaughtown; the Sixth corps, from Manchester en route to Gettysburg; and the Twelfth corps from Littlestown, via Two Taverns, to the field of Gettysburg. Gregg's cavalry division marched from Manchester to Hanover Junction, whence McIntosh's and J. I. Gregg's brigades proceeded to Haris' brigade, of French's division, marched from Frederick City to Turner's Gap in South Mountain. July 5. Leaving Gettysburg, the Second corps marched to Two Taverns; the Fifth corps, to Marsh Run; the Sixth corps, to Fairfield; the Eleventh corps, to Rock Creek; the Twelfth corps, to Littlestown; and McIntosh's brigade, of ngton and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, en route to Frederick City. July 7. The First corps marched from Emmettsburg to Hamburg; the Second corps, from Two Taverns to Taneytown; the Third corps, from Gettysburg, via Emmettsburg, to Mechanicstown; the Fifth corps, from Moritz Cross-roads, via Emmettsburg, to Utica; the Sixt
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