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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
At Wauhatchie May 5 to June 18. (A detachment at Lexington, Ky., June 10, 1864.) At Lafayette till August 4. Actions at Lafayette June 24 and 30. At Calhoun August 4 to October 12. Pine Log Creek and near Fairmount August 14. Resaca October 12-13. Near Summerville October 18. Little River, Ala., October 20ie, Tenn., May 5 to June 18. At Lee and Gordon's Mills and Lafayette till August 4. Action at Lafayette June 24. Actions at Lost Mountain July 1-2. At Calhoun and Dalton till October 12. Pine Log Creek and near Fairmount August 14. Dalton August 14-15 (Co. B ). Rousseau's pursuit of Wheeler September 1-8. Rlhoun, Ky., November, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Action at Whippoor — will Creek, Ky., December 1, 1861. Moved to South Carrollton, thence to Calhoun, Owensboro and Nashville, Tenn., February, 1862. March to Savannah, Tenn., March 17-April 6. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 7. Advance on and siege of Co
8. Operations in East Tennessee till April, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Rocky Faced Ridge and Dalton May 8-13. Buzzard's Roost Gap or Mill Springs May 8-9. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Near Calhoun May 16. Adairsville May 17. Near Kingston May 18-19. Near Cassville May 19. Advance on Dallas May 22-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Oper Operations in East Tennessee till April, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstrations on Rocky Faced Ridge and Dalton May 8-13. Buzzard's Roost Gap or Mill Springs May 8-9. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Near Calhoun May 16. Adairsville May 17. Near Kingston May 18-19. Near Cassville May 19. Advance on Dallas May 22-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Oper
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Tennessee Volunteers. (search)
on and Goldsboro March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 9-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at Raleigh and Greensboro till June. Mustered out June 30, 1865. Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 40 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 204 Enlisted men by disease. Total 246. 5th Tennessee Regiment Mounted Infantry. Organized at Cleveland, Nashville, Calhoun and Chattanooga, Tenn., September 23, 1864. Attached to District of the Etowah, Dept. of the Cumberland, and garrison duty in that District and at Dalton and Marietta, Ga., till July, 1865. Skirmish at McLemore's Cove, Ga., February 1, 1865. Expedition from Dalton to Coosawattie River and Spring Place, Ga., April 1-4. Mustered out July 17, 1865. Organized at Boston and Williamsburg, Ky., April 18, 1862. Attached to 25th Brigade, 7th Division, Army of the Ohio, to October,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Lost Mountain June 15-17. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Howell's Ferry July 1. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Chattahoochie River July 6-17. Beachtown July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. McCook's Raid on Atlanta & West Point Railroad July 27-31. Campbellton July 28. Newnan July 30-31. Expedition to Jasper August 11-15. At Cartersville August 18-October 17. Rousseau's pursuit of Wheeler September 1-8. At Calhoun till November 14. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., November 14, and duty there till December 4. Pursuit of Lyon from Paris to Hopkinsville, Ky., thence march to Nashville, Tenn., December 6, 1864 to January 8, 1865. Action at Hopkinsville, Ky., December 16. At Chickasaw, Ala., till March, 1865. Wilson's Raid from Chickasaw, Ala., to Macon, Ga., March 22-April 24. Centreville April 1. Selma April 2. Lowndesborough April 10 (Cos. A and B ). Montgomery April 12. Colum
the campaign of 1864 the regiments of the brigade were commanded as follows: Third and First, Maj. Glover A. Ball; First cavalry and Fourth, Lieut.-Col. Edward Badger; Sixth, Col. Angus D. Mc-Lean; Seventh, Lieut.-Col. Tillman Ingram. The brigade took part in the fighting at Dalton, Mill Creek gap, Rocky Face ridge, and Resaca. In the latter engagement General Finley was wounded and Col. Robert Bullock, who had been exchanged, took command of the brigade. They were under cavalry fire at Calhoun and Adairsville, and skirmished at Cassville. Reaching Dallas on May 23d they charged the Federal line on the 28th and suffered severe loss, and skirmished on that line until the Federal army was withdrawn. Subsequently they were engaged at Acworth, and on the Pine mountain line, until on June 18th they were placed in reserve one mile west of Kenesaw mountain. Marching thence to the southwest they were in the battle of July 2d, holding their position within 60 yards of the enemy on Chea
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
iro, Ill. 117, 1; 153, C12; 171 Calcasieu Pass, La. 135-A; 157, D14 Calcasieu River, La. 52, 1; 54, 1; 135-A; 155, G1; 156, B2, 156, C1; 158, G14 Caledonia, La. 155, A6 Caledonia, Mo. 47, 1; 152, H8; 171 Calfkiller Creek, Tenn. 24, 3 Calhoun, Ga. 48, 1; 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 1, 58, 2; 59, 3; 62, 1; 63, 4; 76, 1, 76, 2; 88, 2; 101, 10; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, E11 Calhoun, Ky. 118, 1; 150, B4; 151, H5 Calhoun, Mo. 152, E1; 161, F12 Calhoun, Tenn. 24, 3; 97, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 142, F1; 149, B12 California (State) 120, 1; 134, 1; 162-171 California, Department of (U): Boundaries 162 California, Mo. 135-A Camak, Ga. 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 143, F6; 144, B6 Cambridge, Mo. 135-A; 152, B2 Camden, Ark. 47, 1; 53, 1; 135-A; 154, G2; 171 Camden, S. C. 76, 2; 79, 3; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 139, C2; 143, C11; 171 Camden Court-House, N. C. 138, B12 Camden Point, Mo. 161
n Allen's brigade, Wheeler's corps, Johnston's army. (950) In General Wheeler's communication addressed to Soldiers of the Cavalry Corps, dated June 18, 1864, he says: The Third Alabama regiment, Colonel Mauldin, having been detached dashed into Calhoun, defeated the enemy and destroyed a large, heavily-laden train of cars. A detachment also destroyed another large train a short distance north of the town. No. 99—(1071) In Hagan's brigade, Allen's division, Wheeler's corps, department of Soford died in the service. Capt. S. P. Dobbs was wounded at Shelbyville and in Georgia. Capt. James M. Robinson was wounded and captured; Capt. John B. Floyd was wounded at Noonday Creek; Capt. William E. Thompson was wounded in Tennessee and at Calhoun; Capt. Robert W. Figg was wounded at Dover; Capt. George Mason, who commanded the regiment in the summer of 1864, was wounded at Atlanta; Capt. James M. Stevenson was killed at Dover, Capt. William E. Wayland at Rome, and Capt. James E. Nance i
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
ard fail to suppress. On the 14th the entire army is massed on the banks of the Hiawassee. Long has come back without having reached the train he was seeking, but his manoeuvre has rendered uneasy the Confederates. He establishes himself at Calhoun, in front of Charleston, on the Hiawassee, so as to protect, in concert with Elliott, the overland road and the railway from Knoxville to Chattanooga. Sherman will bring back the rest of his troops to this last town. His columns, which are fotwithstanding the bad condition of the roads, arrived on the 27th of December at Charleston ere the Southern troopers, who started too late, could come up with him. The bridge over the Hiawassee is guarded by Long's brigade, that Sherman left at Calhoun. On the morning of the 28th, at the moment when the train was commencing to pass over the river, Wheeler appeared before Charleston and sharply attacked the infantry that was covering the crossing. The latter, being surprised, began to fall ba
rom the Chase — Sherman sent to Knoxville. Returning from the front on the 28th, I found that Granger had not yet got off, nor would he have the number of men I had directed. Besides, he moved with reluctance and complaints. I therefore determined, notwithstanding the fact that two divisions of Sherman's forces had marched from Memphis and had gone into battle immediately on their arrival at Chattanooga, to send him with his command; and orders in accordance therewith were seat him at Calhoun to assume command of the troops then with Granger, to addition to those with him, and proceed with all possible dispatch to the relief of Burnside. Gen. Elliot had been ordered by Thomas, on the 25th of November, to proceed from Alexandria, Tennessee, to Knoxville with his cavalry division, to aid in the relief of that place. The approach of Sherman caused Longstreet to raise the siege of Knoxville and retreat eastward on the night of the 4th of December. Sherman succeeded in throwing
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