hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: April 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 73 results in 31 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
of Antietam September 16-17. At Hagerstown, Md., September 26-October 29. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 29-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth, Va., till April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Deep Run Ravine June 5-13. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-4. Near Fairfield, Pa., July 5. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Reconnoissance to Madison Court House February 27-March 2, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 3-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient, Bloody Angle, May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
16-17. Moved to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 22, and duty there till October 22. Advance up Loudoun Valley and movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 18. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth till April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Franklin's Crossing June 5-13. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-4. Near Fairfield July 5. Funkstown, Md., July 10-13. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. At Brandy Station till May, 1864. Rapidan Campaign May-June. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania C. H. May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
valry October 11. At Hagerstown October 13-31. March to Aquia Creek November 3-18. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. At White Oak Church till April, 1863. Mud March January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations about Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May 4. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 2-4. Near Fairfield, Pa., July 5. About Funkstown, Md., July 10-13. Detached duty at New York, Albany and Troy August-September during draft disturbances. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Duty at Brandy Station till April, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River May 4-June 15. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court H
al Richard L. Page General Richard L. Page, distinguished in the naval and military history of the Confederate States, was born in Clarke county, Va., in 1807. The worthy Virginia family to which he belongs is descended from John Page, an immigrant from England in early days, one of whose descendants, John Page, wedded Jane Byrd of Westover. Their son, Mann Page, was father to William Byrd Page, born at North End, Gloucester county, in 1768, who was a farmer by occupation, and died at Fairfield, Clarke county, in 1812. He married Ann Lee, who was born at Leesylvania, Prince William county, in 1776, and died at Washington, D. C. She was a daughter of Henry Lee, and sister of Gen. Henry Lee, the famous cavalry officer, known as Light Horse Harry, father of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Another brother, Charles Lee, was attorney-general of the United States in Washington's administration. Richard L. Page, son of William Byrd and Ann Page, became a midshipman in the United States navy March
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
Fauquier Springs, Bristoe, Second Manassas, Ox Hill, (or Chantilly), Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville (or Second Fredericksburg), Salem Church, Winchester, Gettysburg, Second Bristoe, Rappahannock, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, the Po, Bethesda, Lynchburg, Monocacy, Washington, Parker's Ford, Shepperdstown, Kernstown, Winchester again (or Oppequan), Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek and Waynesboro, and in many less affairs, such as Auburn, Summerville Ford, Fairfield and Port Republic. Some of these names stand for several days of battle. I doubt if there was an officer or soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia who, in the open field, was oftener under fire. He was the right-hand man of Jackson, in his corps, and the right-hand man of Lee, after Jackson had fallen, and he enjoyed the abiding confidence of both. He was successively a colonel, a brigadier-general, a major-general and a lieutenant-general, each promotion coming to him unsolicited an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
ch were then organizing. He had been a fellow-student of Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Robert E. Lee, and of the newly-elected President of the Confederacy, Mr. Davis. Some time after this company was organized another company formed near Fairfield, and attached to the Fifty-second Virginia regiment of infantry, under Colonel John B. Baldwin, was equipped as an artillery company under Rev. John Miller, a Presbyterian minister, as captain, and this was known as the Second Rockbridge Artill the sketch of movements is resumed as follows:] July 1st, marched twenty miles to Gettysburg; 2d and 3d, engaged in battle—lost fourteen men wounded and seven horses killed; 4th, fell back three miles with rest of the army; 5th, eight miles to Fairfield; 6th, crossed the mountain and marched twenty miles to Waynesboro, Pa.; 7th, twelve miles to Hagerstown, Md.; 8th, 9th, and 10th, remained in camp; 11th, five miles, and took position in line of battle west of Hagerstown, and remained in positi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company D, Clarke Cavalry. (search)
f the company. When General Harney was captured there was no fighting. The train was stopped and surrounded, and Lieutenant (afterwards Major) Samuel J. C. Moon, of Clarke, went into the car, brought him out, and sent him to Richmond. There were numerous skirmishes and raids incident to war, of which, for want of space, no mention has been made. At Gettysburg, the 6th Regiment, being on the right of our army, got in the rear of Meade, and had a hard hand-to-hand fight at a place called Fairfield with the 6th United States Regulars, in which the Regulars were badly whipped and fled ingloriously from the field. We thought that Meade was falling back, for everything was in the greatest confusion, and were grievously surprised when we were ordered back ourselves. The Cavalry was there. Many writers have been trying to find out where the cavalry was at Gettysburg, and if they had been with this writer, who was trying his level best to obliterate Meade's army, they would have kno
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
, Bob and Bunny Crouch, and myself. Time tells a mighty tale! The old trooper refers in loving terms to the officers who commanded respectively the Henrico and Chesterfield dragoons. There was, he says, a mutual understanding between them and the captain of our company to dine every recurring Fourth of July, 22d of February, and 19th of October, at such places as each commander in turn might designate by a card of invitation. Our dining-days found us sometimes at Buchanan's Spring or Fairfield, or Bloody Run, or Ritchie's Spring, or the Farmer's Hotel, in Manchester. Oh! these were bully times. They were, indeed. Do not the poets feign the old times to be always the best, the new to be always the worst? Scan the list above given, and say if it be possible now to make another like it. The first commander of the reorganized troop, 1840-41, was John M. Gregory, who became subsequently one of Virginia's most popular governors. Both his predecessors and successors in comman
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Munford's Marylanders never surrendered to foe. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. (search)
to do as he pleases. Those who are willing to accompany me will side to the right and form in line. Ridgely in the meantime had fastened our banner to a crude staff, under which every Marylander present rallied, and with Colonel Dorsey at the head of the little band, we moved forward, passing through Waynesboro, encamping for the night five miles south of the town. At sunrise the march was resumed, and proceeded southward for three days and a half, passing through Greenville, Midway, Fairfield, Lexington and Springfield. We crossed the James river at Buchanan and reached Cloverdale at noon on Saturday, April 29, 1865. We then went into camp and the men were given their discharge. The following address was read to the men by Lieutenant Ditty: The farewell address. To the gallant band who claim Maryland as their song: Soldiers,—You, my veteran friends, who have weathered the storm, may now sing your song with proud hearts. It once could be heard on every lip, but
o time to execute the intention of General Smith to burn the town. At East Haven, where Tryon commanded, dwelling-houses were fired, and cattle wantonly killed; but his troops were in like manner driven to their ships. Some unarmed inhabitants had been barbarously murdered, others carried away as prisoners. The British ranks were debased by the large infusion of convicts and vagabonds recruited from the jails of Germany. On the afternoon of the seventh, the expedition 7. landed near Fairfield. The village, a century and a quarter old, situated near the water with a lovely country for its background, contained all that was Chap. X.} 1779. July 7. best in a New England community,—a moral, welleducated, industrious people; modest affluence; wellordered homes; many freeholders as heads of families; all of unmixed lineage, speaking the language of the English bible. Early puritanism had smoothed its rugged features under the influence of a region so cheerful and benign; and an E
1 2 3 4