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General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 28 (search)
sonal supervision to the infantry, and sent nearly all his staff-officers to the Fifth Corps to see that the mistakes made were corrected. After the capture of the angle I started off toward the right to see how matters were going there. I went in the direction of Crawford's division, on our right. Warren, whose personal gallantry was always conspicuous, had had his horse shot while with these troops. I passed around the left of the enemy's works, then rode due west to a point beyond the Ford road. Here I rejoined Sheridan a little before dark. He was laboring with all the energy of his nature to complete the destruction of the enemy's forces, and to make preparations to protect his own detached command from a possible attack by Lee's army in the morning. He said to me that he had just relieved Warren, and placed Griffin in command of the Fifth Corps. I had been sending frequent bulletins to the general-in-chief during the day, and now despatched a courier announcing the chang
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 31 (search)
e seemed to be aboard a curious-looking vessel moving rapidly toward a dark and indefinite shore. This time, alas! the dream was not to be the precursor of good news. The President and Mrs. Lincoln invited the general and Mrs. Grant to go to Ford's Theater and occupy a box with them to see Our American Cousin. The general said he would be very sorry to have to decline, but that Mrs. Grant and he had made arrangements to go to Burlington, New Jersey, to see their children, and he feared it return to Philadelphia nearly as soon as his train could be got ready, he continued on, took her to her destination, returned to Philadelphia, and was in Washington the next morning. It was found that the President had been shot and killed at Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth; that Mr. Seward had received severe but not fatal injuries at the hands of Payne, who attempted his assassination; but that no attack had been made on the Vice-President. When the likenesses of Booth appeared, they
uarding the Confederate trains north of Hatcher's Run beyond the crossing of the Ford road. I felt certain the enemy would fight at Five Forks-he had to-so, while flank would be taken care of by Mackenzie, who was to be pushed over toward the Ford road and Hatcher's Run. The front of the corps was oblique to the White Oak flection of this division on a line of march which finally brought it out on the Ford road near C. Young's house, frustrated the purpose I had in mind when ordering t. The only stand the enemy tried to make was when he attempted to form near the Ford road. Griffin pressed him so hard there, however, that he had to give way in shd Claiborne roads, leaving Bartlett, now commanding Griffin's division, near the Ford road. Mackenzie also was left on the Ford road at the crossing of Hatcher's RunFord road at the crossing of Hatcher's Run, Merritt going into camp on the widow Gillian's plantation. As I had been obliged to keep Crook's division along Stony Creek throughout the day, it had taken no act
l Meade to return Miles. On this request I relinquished command of the division, when, supported by the Fifth Corps it could have broken in the enemy's right at a vital point; and I have always since regretted that I did so, for the message Humphreys conveyed was without authority from General Grant, by whom Miles had been sent to me, but thinking good feeling a desideratum just then, and wishing to avoid wrangles, I faced the Fifth Corps about and marched it down to Five Forks, and out the Ford road to the crossing of Hatcher's Run. After we had gone, General Grant, intending this quarter of the field to be under my control, ordered Humphreys with his other two divisions to move to the right, in toward Petersburg. This left Miles entirely unsupported, and his gallant attack made soon after was unsuccessful at first, but about 3 o'clock in the afternoon he carried the point which covered the retreat from Petersburg and Richmond. Merritt had been sent westward, meanwhile, in the
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 63: the journey to Greensborough.—the surrender of Johnston. (search)
afternoon, and with several other Kentuckians I went to the depot. His first desire was to see the President, so we went with him to Mr. Davis. We found him sitting in a chair in the door which opened on the sidewalk. After shaking hands with General Breckinridge, he asked immediately: Is it true, General, that Mr. Lincoln was killed? Yes, sir, replied General Breckinridge (who had just come from the front). General Sherman received a telegram this morning that he was shot in Ford's theatre, at Washington, last night. Mr. Davis said promptly, and with feeling, I am sorry to learn it. Mr. Lincoln was a much better man than his successor will be, and it will go harder with our people. It is bad news for us. The letter that follows shows General Hampton's views of the surrender at the time, and his loyal feeling to our cause, which, however, like Mr. Davis's, were never doubted. Yorkville, May 1, 1865. My dear Sir: I left Hillsborough as soon as I learned of th
7. John Gold and Elias Paulding were arraigned in the Mayor's Court, at Richmond, Va., for avowing themselves subjects of the Lincoln Government, and expressing sentiments disloyal to the Southern Confederacy. John Gold is an Irishman; Elias Paulding, the other prisoner, is a man about fifty years of age, and apparently an American. William Hammond, a McCulloch Ranger, and another member of the same company, were sworn as witnesses. Hammond deposed: I was taking supper last night at Ford's, and the conversation at the table turned on the late affair at Roanoke Island, and the subsequent treatment of our men by the Yankees. I said we had been treated about as well as prisoners of war could expect. Gold spoke up, and asked if any one ever had been maltreated under the Stars and Stripes. He said he himself was a soldier, and a member of the Polish Brigade. That he had been dragged to the recruiting office in New Orleans with a halter about his neck, and forced to enlist. He
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
cavalry command, and having whipped it according to orders, now came galloping back to join in the general scrimmage. He reported to Sheridan in person, and was ordered to strike out toward Hatcher's Run, then move west and get possession of the Ford road in the enemy's rear. Soon Ayres's men met with a heavy fire on their left flank and had to change direction by facing more toward the west. As the troops entered the woods and moved forward over the boggy ground and struggled through the us to see. After the capture of the angle I started off toward the right to see how matters were going there. I went in the direction of Crawford's division, passed around the left of the enemy's works, then rode due west to a point beyond the Ford road. Here I met Sheridan again, just a little before dark. He was laboring with all the energy of his nature to complete the destruction of the enemy's forces, and to make preparation to protect his own detached command from an attack by Lee in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
and requested him to wait a few minutes, as he was just receiving an important dispatch, which he ought to see before he left. The dispatch was from Mr. Stanton announcing the assassination of Mr. Lincoln, and the attempt on the life of Mr. Seward and his son. On Sunday, April 9th, President Lincoln reached Washington on his return from his visit to the field of operations on the James, having left Richmond on the 6th. (See p. 727.) On the night of Friday, the 14th, the President visited Ford's Theatre, where he was shot by John Wilkes Booth. The next morning about 7 o'clock Mr. Lincoln died. Booth escaped from the city, and, guided by some confederates, crossed the Potomac near Port Tobacco, Maryland, to Mathias Point, Virginia (see map, p. 84), on Saturday night, April 22d. On Monday, the 24th, he crossed the Rappahannock from Port Conway to Port Royal and took refuge in a barn, where he was found on Wednesday, the 26th, by a detachment of Company L, 16th New York Cavalry, an
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
ply with that commander's requisition for intrenching tools, that he might fortify his position; so, on the 12th, when McLaws' advance appeared on the crest of the Elk Mountain, two or three miles northward, and soon commenced skirmishing, McLaws and Anderson had evacuated Pleasant Valley on the day when Jackson captured Martinsburg. McLaws at once ordered Kershaw to take his own and Barksdale's brigades up a rough mountain road to the crest of the Elk Mountain, and to follow the ridge to Ford's position on Maryland Heights. Ford had only a slight breast-work of trees, with an abatis in front of it, near the crest, for defense. He repelled an assault in force at an early hour on the 13th, but when it was renewed a little later, by Kershaw, some of his troops gave way and fled in great confusion. They were rallied, but the Confederates had secured such vantage-ground that, under cover of darkness, at two o'clock the next morning, Ford, hopeless of aid from Miles, spiked his guns a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
housand men and several battle-flags. Merritt, meanwhile, charged the front, and Griffin fell upon the left with such force that he carried the intrenchments, and seized fifteen hundred men. Crawford, meanwhile, had pressed rapidly forward to the Ford road, northward of the post, cut off their retreat in the direction of Lee's main force, and turning southward on that highway, struck them in the rear, and captured four guns. In this perilous position, with Warren upon their flank and rear, andn, then in command of the Fifth Corps, to impel two divisions in the direction of Petersburg, to reopen communication with the rest of the Army, while Griffin's own division, now commanded by General Bartlett, was directed to push northward up the Ford road to Hatcher's Run, supported by McKenzie's cavalry. Wright, Parke, and Ord, holding the intrenchments in front of Petersburg, were ordered to follow up the bombardment by an assault the next morning. Apprehensive that Lee might withdraw his
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