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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
undisturbed to cover the movement and to conceal it from the observation of the enemy. Orders were given to withdraw the skirmish line at midnight, under direction of Major Dawson, the picket officer of the division. The command marched several miles, and at 3 a. m. bivouacked in rear of the abandoned position of the Twentieth Army Corps. The following morning at 10 o'clock left the position and marched in rear of the army to the right. On the 27th of August the brigade marched to near Camp Creek, and there fortified its position and remained until night of the 28th, when it was detailed to guard the supply train of the corps, and joined the division in its position in the vicinity of the Montgomery railroad. On the 29th the brigade was marched to the railroad to destroy the track. This being successfully and thoroughly accomplished for a considerable distance, the command marched back and bivouacked for the night in rear of the Twentythird Army Corps. On the 30th the command ma
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 89 (search)
Head, where we again engaged on the 19th, expending 8 shot, 10 shell, 16 case; total, 34 rounds. Left camp on 20th, and on 22d took position on main line before Atlanta, where we remained until August 25, expending ammunition as follows : Daily details omitted. Total rounds expended, 1,950. August 10, erected temporary furnace for heating shot and threw six shot into the city, also four shell filled with port fire. August 25, left camp at 10 p. m.; consumed two days in marching to Camp Creek, Ga., where we engaged the enemy on the 27th, expending 8 shot, 6 shell, 7 case; total, 21 rounds. Left camp on the 28th at 6.30 a. in.; consumed six days in marching to the Montgomery railroad, where we again engaged the enemy, expending 3 shot. September 3, expended 30 shot, 17 shell, 39 case, 3 canister; total, 89 rounds. September 4, right section moved out on main line near Lovejoy's Station, Ga.; expended 23 shot, 6 shell, 4 case, 28 canister; total, 61 rounds. 5th, expended 5 shel
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 93 (search)
fter daylight the next morning. On the 27th the corps remained in camp, awaiting the movements of other commands, cutting roads, &c., preparatory to marching the next morning. At 4 a. m. the 28th the corps moved to Mount Gilead Church, where it passed the Fourth Corps, and taking the advance reached its designated camp near Rough and Ready late in the afternoon. During the day's march Morgan's division had the advance, and skirmished quite lively with the enemy's cavalry at and south of Camp Creek. On the 29th the location of my camp remained unchanged; a part of the troops were kept vigorously at work during the day, destroying the railroad track, making reconnaissances, and cutting roads to facilitate our advance the next morning. On the morning of the 30th, in compliance with instructions from Major-General Thomas, the corps moved at an early hour to Shoal Creek Church, on the neighborhood road, where it bivouacked for a few hours, the troops getting their dinners during the ha
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
nce advanced, and, forming line of battle on left of the road, pushed forward as far as crest of the ridge overlooking Swamp Creek. Was relieved from this position by Colonel Wood's brigade, of Butterfield's division, about 9 p. m., and moving to the left, took up position on left of General Ward's brigade, of Butterfield's division, and remained during the night. May 14.-Advanced in line of battle about 8 a. m., skirmishing with the enemy to a small creek about one mile, running into Camp Creek, and halted to await orders. After remaining at this point about two hours the brigade moved forward over the ridge ir front, and crossing Swamp Creek advanced part of the way across the open field beyond to assault the enemy's works; being met by a terrific fire in front and on both flanks, and being wholly unsupported, the brigade fell back with heavy loss to the creek at the foot of the ridge, where it remained until about 11 p. m., when, having been relieved by Col. Dan. McCook's bri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 97 (search)
with Eighty-eighth Indiana on right and Fifteenth Kentucky on left. Companies A and K were deployed as skirmishers, and Major Widmer in charge. They. advanced in line a considerable distance, driving the enemy's skirmishers until they reached Camp Creek, where the enemy was discovered in force. In advancing across an open field in front of the enemy's works the skirmishing companies lost5S men wounded, 1 mortally. The regiment was relieved from this line in the evening by a portion of the Tw the 14th the brigade was formed, the One hundred and fourth in second line, with Eighty-eighth Indiana on right and Fifteenth Kentucky on left. About 2 o'clock the two lines advanced, receiving a galling fire on the ridge just before reaching Camp Creek, and in crossing the creek the two lines closed together, the One hundred and fourth uniting with the Twenty-first Wiscolnsin. The brigade was here halted and remained in this position until after dark, keeping up a heavy fire with the enemy.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 128 (search)
in person, by order, to Major-General Thomas. In accordance with orders here received, moved to the rear of Fourth Army Corps to Redwine's, this point being the right flank of the Army. The enemy's pickets held the ridge on the south side of Camp Creek, and were briskly firing on the pickets of the Fourth Corps. Colonel Mitchell was directed to deploy a regiment from his command, and support it with his brigade. The One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, Colonel Banning commanding, very handsomely drove the enemy over the ridge, and after constructing a bridge over Camp Creek, the whole division moved steadily forward on the road to Mim's, to a point on West Point railroad one-half mile east of Red Oak, meeting with little or no resistance. Crossing the railroad, the Second and Third Brigades (the First, Colonel Lum commanding, having been detailed to guard supply train) took up a position facing east, their right about a mile and a half south of the railroad. August 29, First Briga
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 159 (search)
Dalton. Orn the 13th we groped slowly and cautiously, mostly through dense woods, the skirmishing still continuing all day and most of the night. During the morning of the 14th we skirmished our way to the front of the enemy's breast-works on Camp Creek, in the neighborhood of Resaca, on the Dalton and Atlanta Railroad. At about 1 o'clock on this day an assault was made on the enemy's works along much of the line. I was ordered by General Turchin, then in command of the brigade, to allow Ha the Twenty-fourth Illinois was in column to my rear. It was from half to three-quarters of a mile to the enemy's works. We had to move through dense woods and underbrush and up quite a steep hill till we reached the brow of the hill skirting Camp Creek. We had heavy skirmish lines thrown out, and as we advanced the enemy's skirmishers were driven into their works. Judah's division moved impetuously to the charge, and we had to follow at rapid pace. Our advance was assailed by artillery fir
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
point from the Widow Kennedy's. The church (Mount Gilead) is on the north side of and near to Camp Creek, about sixteen miles from Atlanta and four miles from the Atlanta and West Point Railroad. Th and it will move parallel with us, on our right, to-morrow, when we will face south and cross Camp Creek. Day very hot. Heavy showers through the day. August 27.-8 a. m., in accordance with Genal Wood reached Mount Gilead Church. His division passed it a short distance until it reached Camp Creek. Here he halted and formed a line of battle, facing east and running north and south, his rigprotecting from the enemy's cavalry). This division was posted on a ridge on the south side of Camp Creek, and was placed in line of battle, also running north and south and facing toward the east. T he now occupies he met the enemy's skirmishers (dismounted cavalry), and he drove them across Camp Creek. When General Newton crossed the creek he also drove them, and he skirmished with them until
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
the deadly conflict. Our fighting at Resaca did not effect much. There might possibly have been as much accomplished if we had used skirmish-lines alone. In McPherson's front Logan had a battery well placed, and fired till he had silenced the troublesome foes on a ridge in his front; then his brave men, at a run, passed the ravine and secured the ridge. Here Logan intrenched his corps; and Dodge, abreast of him, did the same. Afterward, McPherson seized another piece of ground across Camp Creek, and held it. During the evening of the 14th a vigorous effort was made by Polk to regain this outpost, but he was repulsed with loss. The detailed account gives great credit to Generals Charles R. Woods, Giles A. Smith, and J. A. J. Lightburn. One hundred prisoners and 1300 Confederates hors de combat were on Logan's list. This work forced Johnston to lay a, new bridge over the Oostenaula. The divisions of Absalom Baird, R. W. Johnson, Jefferson C. Davis, and John Newton plunged into
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
on the Oostenaula River, and his left abreast the village. Thomas came up on his left, facing Camp Creek, and Schofield forced his way through the dense woods to the left of Thomas, and confronted thensued in the afternoon and evening of the 15th. May. McPherson had secured a lodgment across Camp Creek, near the town, and held a hill which commanded the bridges across the Oostenaula, while Thomam several strong Battle-field of Resaca. this is a view of the battle-ground, eastward of Camp Creek, about two miles northwest of Resaca, as it appeared when the writer sketched it, on the anninfederates left, and another earth-fort near by. The heaviest of the battle was fought near Camp Creek, about two miles from the station, in the direction of Snake Gap. The day was very. warm, anf beginning. After visiting places of interest connected with the struggle near the head of Camp Creek, and sketching the theater of the hottest of the fight, delineated on page 376, we went over t
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