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Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 15, 1865., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
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with certain domestic traitors, high in office in the secret organizations aforesaid, in the sudden mustering of a force, mainly of American Knights (locally known as Illini ), which should first liberate the 8,000 Rebel captives then held in Camp Douglas, near that city; thence rushing with rapidly augmented numbers to the achievement of a similar success at the prison-camp near Indianapolis-thus raising the siege of Richmond and Atlanta by a fire in the rear --but that such a conspiracy had for weeks existed; that many then in Chicago were heartily engaged in it; and that, but for the extraordinary astuteness, vigilance, and energy, of Col. B. J. Sweet, then in command over Camp Douglas — there would have been at least a desperate attempt to execute the bloody programme — are facts which rest on testimony too positive, and drawn from too many independent sources, to be distrusted. But Sweet had mastered their secret, through the treachery of one or more who were trusted by the lea
hat they at one time offered to parole and release generally our men in their hands, requiring only a pledge that they should be put to no military use until regularly exchanged. It is not stated, however, that the Blacks were included in this offer, especially those whom they had sold into slavery. Prisoners of war are apt to complain of harsh treatment, and not without reason; and such complaint was made by Rebel prisoners against our officers who held them in custody, especially at Camp Douglas (Chicago), and on Rock Island, in the Mississippi — the former having been the focus of repeated conspiracies to overpower their guards, break out, and, in conjunction with secret allies outside, cut their way back to the Confederacy, liberating other prisoners by the way. In Missouri, Gen. John McNeil was charged with cruelty in shooting ten prisoners (bushwhackers), in retaliation for the secret taking off of one Unionist, who suddenly disappeared. On the other hand, the treatment of
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 13: aggregate of deaths in the Union Armies by States--total enlistment by States--percentages of military population furnished, and percentages of loss — strength of the Army at various dates casualties in the Navy. (search)
1 10 8 Georgia               2 Virginia 1               Indian Nations 11 1 1       2 111 Colored Troops 106 25 13 52 1 32 86 Penitent Rebels; six regiments, organized from the prison-camps at Point Lookout, Rock Island, Alton, Camp Douglas, and Columbus, and composed of Confederate prisoners who took the oath of allegiance and enlisted in the United States service.3,306 Veteran Reserves 15   11 1   5 47 11 Hancock's Corps 1   2     1 5   United States Sharpshooters     1       2 8 United States Volunteer Infantry Penitent Rebels; six regiments, organized from the prison-camps at Point Lookout, Rock Island, Alton, Camp Douglas, and Columbus, and composed of Confederate prisoners who took the oath of allegiance and enlisted in the United States service. 5   1 2     6 4 Generals and Staffs             1   Miscellaneous, Brigade Bands, &c.       1       12 Regular Army 16 1 27 6   7 63 106 Totals 520 104 391
geant James Cantillon, company H, Second cavalry, February 5, at Camp Douglas. Private William Slocum, company K, Second cavalry, February 5, at Camp Douglas. Sergt. A. Stevens, company M, Second cavalry, February 6, at Camp Douglas. Private M. O'Brian, company H, Second cavCamp Douglas. Private M. O'Brian, company H, Second cavalry, February 6, at Camp Douglas. Corporal P. Frawley, company H, Second cavalry, February 8, at Camp Douglas. Private W. Wall, companyCamp Douglas. Corporal P. Frawley, company H, Second cavalry, February 8, at Camp Douglas. Private W. Wall, company A, Second cavalry, February 8, at Camp Douglas. The moment the battle was over, the first attention was given to the wounded, and before tCamp Douglas. Private W. Wall, company A, Second cavalry, February 8, at Camp Douglas. The moment the battle was over, the first attention was given to the wounded, and before the sun had set and closed to them that memorable day, Colonel Connor had them all transported to the south side of the river, where Dr. Reed rCamp Douglas. The moment the battle was over, the first attention was given to the wounded, and before the sun had set and closed to them that memorable day, Colonel Connor had them all transported to the south side of the river, where Dr. Reed rendered them every surgical aid, and, as well as possible, dressed their wounds to prepare them for the return journey to camp. The living ga order was read to the troops: headquarters District Utah, camp Douglas, U. T., February 6, 1863. The Colonel Commanding has the plea
Doc. 142.-battle at bear River, W. T. Report of Colonel Connor. headquarters District of Utah, camp Douglas, W. T., February 6, 1863. Colonel: I have the honor to report that from information received from various sources of the encampment of a large body of Indians on Bear River, in Washington Territory, one hundred attending general court-martial, as volunteers. I marched the first night to Brigham City, about sixty-eight miles distant, and the second night's march from Camp Douglas, I overtook the infantry and artillery at the town of Menden, and ordered them to march again that night. I resumed my march with the cavalry, and overtook th, or thirst, not a murmur escaping them to indicate their sensibilities to pain or fatigue. Their uncomplaining endurance during their four nights' march from Camp Douglas to the battle-field is worthy of the highest praise. The weather was intensely cold, and not less than seventy-five had their feet frozen, and some of them, I
ountry to the d — l, where they are now trying to run it. One daguerreotype of Harriet Beecher Stowe — not so much on account of its beauty as its---- Two barrels of wooden nutmegs, as evidence of the skill, enterprise, and ability of the Yankees to carry on this war one million years or more. One half pumpkin, grown in Connecticut, carried to Texas, and captured in Cork by a Tennesseean, who went hunting his rights in a bold privateer, to be used as a washtub by the prisoners at Camp Douglas, Chicago. One thousand copies of each of the Louisville Journal, containing the highly complimentary letters of its correspondent, Dr. Adonis, on the secesh women of the South, their frailties and follies. When read by the Northern rebel prisoners they (the papers) all to be reported at this post, then distributed to the fair little rebs of Murfreesboro, who are to use them as pillows, (wrapped in the Stars and Stripes, of course,) the better to facilitate their enraptured dreams of b
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.13 (search)
ailroad cars, and taken across the State of Illinois to Camp Douglas, on the outskirts of Chicago. Our prison-pen was a squourselves with all the evil and the good to be found at Camp Douglas, neither of us saw any reason at first why we could notcallous towards their prisoners than the authorities of Camp Douglas were. I admit that we were better fed than the Union pion completed, when they think of Andersonville, Libby, Camp Douglas, and other prisons, and of the blood shed in 2261 battls, and Prisoners' Aid Society; and the sights we saw at Camp Douglas will never be seen in America again. Were Colonel Mie been the salvation of two-thirds of those who died at Camp Douglas; and, by showing how superior the United States Governmprotection than he! The only official connected with Camp Douglas whom I remember with pleasure is Mr. Shipman, the commintions. I scarcely comprehended him at the outset, for Camp Douglas was not a place to foster intentions. He explained tha
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
Coomassie, 229, 292, 293. Crete, 230. Cromer, 453. Cronin, Mr., 151-153. Cypress Grove, 151-166. Dalziell, Mr., 476. Darkest Africa, In, 411, 422. Davis, Richard Harding, 508. Death, thoughts on the fear of, 522, 523. Degrees conferred on Stanley, 424, 525. Denbigh, 219. Denbigh Castle, 4-8. Dido, the captain of the, 114. Dilke, Sir, Charles, 473, 474, 477. Dillon, John, 474, 476. Dixie Greys, the, 165, 166. Donnelly, Ignatius, Coesar's Column, 433. Douglas, Camp, 205-214. East African Company, 446-449. East Anglia, 450. Education, thoughts on, 523-525. Eisteddfod, the, 14, 16, 430, 434. Ellison, Mr., 106, 112. Emin Pasha, calls for help, 353; as described by Dr. Felkin, 354; discovered, 361; Stanley's impression of, 362; a prisoner, 368; deceived by his officers, 368; goes with Stanley to the coast, 370-372; has a fall from a balcony, 372; engages himself to the Germans, 373, 374; death of, 375. England, and Coomassie, 285-295;
nant H. H. Smith, of North Carolina; 5, Lieutenant J. J. Andrews, of Alabama; and 15, J. A. Tomlinson, of Kentucky. Camp Douglas, near Chicago: where Confederate prisoners from the West were confined. In the foreground stands a Confederate serg to choose a mess-sergeant from among their own number. These hundreds of men are a part of the thousands confined at Camp Douglas. The barracks were enclosed by a fence to confine the Confederate prisoners taken at Forts Donelson and Henry, and ne for the kitchen. In the remaining seventy feet an average of one hundred and seventy men slept in tiers of bunks. Camp Douglas was located on land belonging to the Stephen A. Douglas estate, and was bounded by Cottage Grove Avenue on the east, FIsland, in Sandusky Bay, Ohio; City Point, Maryland, and Rock Island, in the Mississippi River. Among the second were Camp Douglas, at Chicago, Illinois; Camp Butler, at Springfield, Illinois; Camp Morton, at Indianapolis, Indiana; Camp Chase, at Co
er prisons. A very expensive hospital was erected, paid for from the prison fund, which amounted to one hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars in 1865. Camp Douglas, in Chicago, was a large instruction and recruiting camp, of which the prison formed a comparatively small part. The Camp was on low ground, which was flooded strain of feeding both the Army of Northern Virginia and a considerable number of prisoners in Virginia. The exchange of prisoners following the agreement Camp Douglas, where ten percent of the prisoners died one month In February, 1863, out of 3,884 prisoners, 387 died at Camp Douglas in Chicago, or almost exactly ten perCamp Douglas in Chicago, or almost exactly ten per cent., a mortality rate for one month not reached by any other large prison during the war. The Camp was on low ground, the drainage bad, and conditions generally were unsanitary. Its abandonment as a prison was urged by President H. W. Bellows of the Sanitary Commission. It is hard for us to realize, as we look at this group o
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