hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 10 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 10 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 9 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 1,693 results in 245 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 12 (search)
on the 10th day of June, 1864. All information previous to that time is derived from the records of this office, and-from oral information given me by medical officers connected with the army. I joined the headquarters in the field near Big Shanty, Ga., having been prevented by malarial fever from reaching the main army sooner. Shortly after the action at Resaca I went to that place, arriving the morning after the army had advanced, and observed the preparations which had been made for thuntil the last days of June, when it was brought to Big Shanty, but was sent to the rear in a few days, in consequence of that position being uncovered by the flank movement of the armies under General Sherman, which caused the evacuation of Kenesaw Mountain by the rebel forces and gave us possession of Marietta, Ga. On the occupation of that town the field hospital was transferred there somewhere about the 8th of July, 1864. It remained in Marietta until after we had crossed the Chattahoochee
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
ed the enemy's lines closely all day. This night the enemy again abandoned his line, and on the 19th we moved forward and found him in his intrenched line of Kenesaw Mountain. Our lines were pushed up close to the rebel position and intrenched during the night, Grose's brigade on the left, Whitaker's in the center, and Kirby's onrty-first Indiana, a most excellent officer, was killed by one of those chance bullets so destructive to us during our occupation of the trenches in front of Kenesaw Mountain. To mention all the officers deserving of special notice for zeal and good conduct in this long and arduous campaign, would require the naming of the gre General W. C. Whitaker very ably managed his brigade, and deserves well of the Government. He was compelled to leave, from sickness, after the assault of Kenesaw Mountain. The brigade (the Second) has since been well managed by Col. J. E. Taylor, Fortieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Both Colonels Kirby and Taylor well deserve,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
mand of Major Calloway. At about 1 p. m. the skirmishers became engaged with the enemy, and continued warmly engaged throughout the day, the enemy hotly contesting every foot of ground, the Twenty-first losing 2 men wounded. On the 11th we threw up light works. On the 12th did nothing. On the 13th we continued skirmishing with the enemy by details made from the regiment, the enemy being compelled to take refuge in his works located on Pine Mountain, a strong position almost north of Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 15th it was found that the enemy had evacuated during the night. We immediately moved forward and halted in sight of College Hill, near Marietta, Ga., at 8 a. m. We again moved at 10 a. m., and at sunset threw up light works and remained there until the morning of the 17th, when it was found there was no enemy in our front, he having evacuated under cover of darkness. We followed in line of battle until we were relieved, about 12 m., by the Third Division, Four
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
em, and took position about three miles south of Acworth. Here we remained until the 10th June, on which day we advanced skirmishingn) and found the enemy strongly intrenched on Pine Mountain, with his left toward Lost and his right toward Kenesaw Mountain. June 11, took position on the left of Hooker and the right of Wood's division, and threw up earth-works with lumber revetments for artillery and riflemen. Keeping a heavy line of skirmishers forward, the enemy opened from Pine Mountain witt determined courage and efficiency as soldiers on their part, I must have been beaten. I congratulate them on winning one of the most fiercely contested fights in the history of this rebellion. This fight took place on one of the spurs of Kenesaw Mountain. June 21, we strengthened our works under a heavy cannonade from four batteries. The skirmishing was very severe day and night. June 22, the artillery firing was again renewed with great fury. At 10 p. m. my brigade was relieved by a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
he honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Thirty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry Volunteers during the recent campaign, from July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade was ordered to halt for the night, the Thirty-fifth being detailed to picket the brigade front. Early next morning orders were received to advance our lines with a view to drive back the enemy's skirmishers, capture their rifle-pits, if possible, and thereby ch
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
east side of a large farm. My lines were formed for an attack. The Ninth and Thirty-sixth Indiana and Eightieth and Eighty-fourth Illinois, in the front line, advanced, and drove the enemy from his position and into his fortifications upon Kenesaw Mountain and the adjacent hills. My loss was severe, particularly in officers; Lieutenant Bowman, Thirty-sixth Indiana, fell mortally wounded, bravely leading his men in the advance. June 20, contest continued, the enemy trying to hold and we to drsuffered considerable loss. The assault failed with heavy loss to our arms. Heavy skirmishing and artillery firing kept up on both sides until the night of July 2, when the enemy retreated under cover of the night and loosed their hold on Kenesaw Mountain and vacated Marietta. July 3, pursued the enemy early, my brigade in advance. The Fifty-ninth Illinois, the first to enter Marietta, found the enemy in the evening five miles from that place on the Atlanta road strongly intrenched. July 4
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 31 (search)
regiment was formed on left of brigade, my right connecting with Eighty-fourth Illinois. Advanced on the enemy's lines, driving then steadily before us across fields, swollen streams, and through brush till we came up to a hill in front of Kenesaw Mountain, where I built strong works. At dark advanced 250 yards over an open field and built works in good musket-range of the enemy's works, still on the left of the brigade, my right connecting with the Eighty-fourth Illinois Volunteers. The loss of heroism worthy of special mention in several cases. Lieut. Daniel McKenzie, with Company D, and detail from Company K, on 19th of June, on skirmish line, drove the enemy from fortified positions and crossed the stream at the foot of Kenesaw Mountain, and ordered a line of battle to surrender, but being answered by a volley, was compelled to fall back with a loss of 2 killed and 7 wounded out of a company of thirty. The skirmish, commanded by First Sergeant Weyrick, and after he was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
vening of July 20 Sergeants Kennedy and Childs, with twenty men, captured 43 rebels from their picket-line and 1 commissioned officer. Many other daring acts of gallantry I might mention if time would permit. The medical staff of my regiment was always found at their posts, ready and willing to alleviate the sufferings of the wounded of all regiments. Too much praise cannot be given them for their unceasing labors. I am pained to record the death of Capt. D. C. Hodsden, who was wounded before Kenesaw Mountain. Major Carter and all the line officers of the regiment have my warmest thanks for their untiring services from the commencement of the campaign. The regiment lost 28 killed and 83 wounded and 2 missing, and the regiment captured from the enemy 5 commissioned officers and 288 enlisted men and several hundred stand of small-arms. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, I. C. B. Suman, Colonel Ninth Indiana Veteran Volunteer Infantry. [Capt. H. W. Lawton.]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 33 (search)
ook position, throwing up works; regiment in second line. At 6 a. m. my regiment,with Fifty-ninth Illinois, moved to the left and front and built line of works in rear of skirmish line. At daybreak next morn the skirmishers are advanced and find the enemy has left his position in our front. The line is immediately ordered forward and occupies the enemy's work. My regiment did not occupy position on front line, but lay in bivouac until the morning of the 19th, when we advanced toward Kenesaw Mountain, driving the enemy until we gained a position near its base. I moved into position in second line, with the Seventy-fifth Illinois on my right and Seventyseventh Pennsylvania on my left. Here I remained until the evening of the 20th at dark, when I moved on the front line, relieving the Eighty-fourth Illinois. At 12 that night I was again relieved by the One hundred and fourth Illinois and moved back some distance in rear of second line into bivouac. At this place I was taken sick,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
iday, June 17, the regiment moved forward some distance and went into camp. There was heavy skirmishing along the line, but my regiment was not engaged. On Saturday, June 18, the skirmishing still continued, but the brigade to which my regiment belongs was in reserve, consequently we were not engaged. On Sunday, June 19, we again moved forward; were met by the rebels about a mile distant from our starting point, where our skirmishers engaged the enemy; fell slowly back to the foot of Kenesaw Mountain; the casualties in the regiment were 1 commissioned officer wounded, 2 enlisted men killed, and 7 enlisted men wounded. On Monday, June 20, the regiment lay in front of Kenesaw all day; no casualties. On Tuesday, June 21, the regiment moved forward and to the right. We were here opened upon by two batteries from the rebels. We threw up a new line of works, it being already the third before Kenesaw in about twenty-four hours; the casualties from the enemy's shells were 1 enlisted man
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...