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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Oak Glen (New Jersey, United States) or search for Oak Glen (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
to me; the God of Christ, and his saints and martyrs. I said to myself: Let me be steeped in the devotion of the Psalms, and of Paul's Epistles! I took up Coquerel's sermons on the Lord's Prayer, simple, beautiful, positive. . .. July 30. Oak Glen. Rose at 6.15 A. M. and had good luck in dressing quickly. With dear Flossy took 9 A. M. train for Boston. At Middletown station found the teachers from the West [Denver and Iowa], who started the Battle Hymn when they saw me approaching. Thays when she was leaving Gardiner at the last moment she handed Laura i a note. It read, be sure to rub the knee thoroughly night and morning! why, she was asked, did I not have this a week ago? I hate to be rubbed! she said. July 1. Oak Glen.... found a typed copy of my rest sermon, delivered in our own church, twelve years ago. Surely preaching has been my greatest privilege and in it I have done some of my best work. July 2. unusually depressed at waking. Feared that I might b
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
aracter. Never forget that we grow like to that we contemplate. Keep it always in mind that it must be through our own efforts that our progress through life shall bring with it the fulfilment of the best promise of our youth. July 2. Oak Glen. Nurse Voshell, nicknamed by me Wollapuk, left this morning. I have become so dependent upon her that I shall miss her very much. I have been impatient of having her so long, but now see how very helpful she has been to me. I began to writeting the death of her cousin and childhood playfellow, Dr. Valentine Mott Francis, when a much greater affliction fell upon her in the death of her son-in-law, David Prescott Hall. This hurts me, she writes, like a physical pain. To Florence Oak Glen, July 3, 1907. My dearest dear Flossy, You are quite right in saying that we greatly need the consoling belief in a future life to help us bear the painful separation which death brings. Surely, the dear Christ believed in immortality, and
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
and reverent interest. These are Boston memories, but those of Oak Glen are no less tender and vivid. There, too, the meals were festivalrrangement of keys made it possible for her room to be entered; at Oak Glen there was but the one stout door. On this occasion, after lying h me some flowers and a curious orchid from Panama. November 3. Oak Glen. Yesterday and to-day have had most exquisite sittings in front of letter was written while she was at work on the poem:-- To Laura Oak Glen, July 9, 1909. Why, yes, I'm doing the best I know how. Have wrss you, not much wiser than your affectionate Ma. Returned to Oak Glen, after the celebration, she writes:-- To her son and his wife OOak Glen, October 1, 1909. .. I found my trees still green, and everything comfortable. I did not dare to write to any one yesterday, my hegh of her children's generation, she had adopted him as an uncle. Oak Glen, October 1, 1909. Dear Uncle George,-- I got through all rig
reece, 264-82; From the Oak to the Olive, 265; Radical Club, 284-86; takes up study of Greek, 287; club life, 291-96; removal to Mt. Vernon St., and purchase of Oak Glen, 296; marriage of three daughters, 297; work for peace, 300-07, 309, 312, 318, 319, 332, 345, 346; II, 8, 77, 326, 327, 359; trip to London and Paris, I, 312-17;83, 384; II, 43, 91, 97, 152, 256; work for woman ministry, I, 384-92; extended European tour; II, 2-34; Egypt, 34-38; Palestine, 38-42; Europe, 43-45; return to Oak Glen, 46; forms Town and Country Club, 47-52; and the Papeterie, 52, 53; incurs permanent lameness, 59; returns to Boston, 60; publication of Modern Society, 60; sett 254, 255, 263. Norton, Mrs., I, 82, 87. Norton, Charles Eliot, II, 198. Norton, Richard, II, 243. Novelli, E., II, 357. Novelli, Mme., I, 357. Oak Glen, I, 296, 317, 339, 340, 347, 349; II, 46, 67, 69, 72, 114, 120, 158, 374. Oakland, II, 136. Oakley, Mr., II, 154. Oberlin, I, 361. O'Connell, Cardina
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