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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
chase to a double flyboat, the which, we also the same day fought with, and tooke her, with losse of three of their men slaine, and one hurt. On Munday the 6 we saw Grand Canarie, and the next day we landed and tooke in fresh water on the Southside thereof. On the 9 we departed from Grand Canary, and framed our course for Dominica . The last of Aprill we saw Dominica , and the same night we came to an anker on the Southside thereof. May.TSouthside thereof. May.THE first of May in the morning many of the Salvages came aboord our ships in their Canowes, and did traffique with us; we also the same day landed and entered their Towne from whence we returned the same day aboord without any resistance of the Salvages; or any offence done to them. The 2 of May our Admirall and our Pinnesse departed from Dominica leaving the John our Vice-admirall playing off and on about Dominica , hoping to take some Spaniard outwardes bound to the Indies; the same night
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift voyage of M. John White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590. (search)
chase to a double flyboat, the which, we also the same day fought with, and tooke her, with losse of three of their men slaine, and one hurt. On Munday the 6 we saw Grand Canarie, and the next day we landed and tooke in fresh water on the Southside thereof. On the 9 we departed from Grand Canary, and framed our course for Dominica . The last of Aprill we saw Dominica , and the same night we came to an anker on the Southside thereof. May.TSouthside thereof. May.THE first of May in the morning many of the Salvages came aboord our ships in their Canowes, and did traffique with us; we also the same day landed and entered their Towne from whence we returned the same day aboord without any resistance of the Salvages; or any offence done to them. The 2 of May our Admirall and our Pinnesse departed from Dominica leaving the John our Vice-admirall playing off and on about Dominica , hoping to take some Spaniard outwardes bound to the Indies; the same night
ries. On Sunday the 5 of Aprill we gave chase to a double flyboat, the which, we also the same day fought with, and tooke her, with losse of three of their men slaine, and one hurt. On Munday the 6 we saw Grand Canarie, and the next day we landed and tooke in fresh water on the Southside thereof. On the 9 we departed from Grand Canary, and framed our course for Dominica . The last of Aprill we saw Dominica , and the same night we came to an anker on the Southside thereof. ries. On Sunday the 5 of Aprill we gave chase to a double flyboat, the which, we also the same day fought with, and tooke her, with losse of three of their men slaine, and one hurt. On Munday the 6 we saw Grand Canarie, and the next day we landed and tooke in fresh water on the Southside thereof. On the 9 we departed from Grand Canary, and framed our course for Dominica . The last of Aprill we saw Dominica , and the same night we came to an anker on the Southside thereof.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
me, that if upon an high mount which is here in the harbour neere to the havens mouth, on the Southside of the harbour where the sea doth beat, ther were two or three great Canons planted on the topwe saw an Iland lying Westward some 30 leagues called Escudo, where wee came to anker on the Southside in 12 fadoms water, faire sand and good ankorage. If you come into the Easterne point, give its higher than the rest some mile to the Eastward of the cape. All Cuba is full of wood on the Southside . The Spanish fleete which then were but 14 no more than we were, kept still upon our weather qs, and stood away for Flores , which the 8 of Aprill we saw, and the 9 came to an anker on the Southside , where we watered because the Defiance when we came in had but two buts of water. We bartered use of the variation of the Compasse. And stirring hence East Southeast, thou shalt goe on the Southside of Bermuda: and must goe with great care, because many have bene lost heere about this Island,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine Spanish Letters intercepted by shippes of the worshipfull Master John Wattes written from diverse places of the islandes and of the maine land as well of Nueva Espanna, as of Tierra Firma and Peru , containing many secrets touching the aforesaid countreys, and the state of the South Sea, and the trade to the Philippinas. (search)
ffend the enemie, if occasion should serve that they should offer to come into the harbour and offer any violence. But the principall thing of all that we want is to have souldiers, foote men, and horsemen. For according as I am informed, here want 100 men which should keepe the coast, if they should offer to land and march up into the countrey. And likewise the people of this countrey have told me, that if upon an high mount which is here in the harbour neere to the havens mouth, on the Southside of the harbour where the sea doth beat, ther were two or three great Canons planted on the top of the hill, (where very good watch is continually kept) from that place they may reach to doe the enemie great hurt, a league into the sea. The new Vice-roy Don Garcia Urtado de Mendoca, worthy of that dignitie, is in great favour with al those of these realmes : for that he is a great solliciter both by sea and land in all kinde of diligence, not loosing one houre in your service, and that whic
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of Frier Alonso new elected Bishop of Mechuacan, to the king of Spaine, written in Peru in the citie de los Reyes the first of March 1590, touching the state of Arica a chiefe Haven in Peru . (search)
ffend the enemie, if occasion should serve that they should offer to come into the harbour and offer any violence. But the principall thing of all that we want is to have souldiers, foote men, and horsemen. For according as I am informed, here want 100 men which should keepe the coast, if they should offer to land and march up into the countrey. And likewise the people of this countrey have told me, that if upon an high mount which is here in the harbour neere to the havens mouth, on the Southside of the harbour where the sea doth beat, ther were two or three great Canons planted on the top of the hill, (where very good watch is continually kept) from that place they may reach to doe the enemie great hurt, a league into the sea. The new Vice-roy Don Garcia Urtado de Mendoca, worthy of that dignitie, is in great favour with al those of these realmes : for that he is a great solliciter both by sea and land in all kinde of diligence, not loosing one houre in your service, and that whic
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage truely discoursed, made by sir Francis Drake, and sir John Hawkins, chiefly pretended for some speciall service on the Islands and maine of the West Indies, with sixe of the Queenes ships, and 21 other shippes and barkes, containing 2500 men and boyes, in the yeere 1595. In which voyage both the foresayd knights died by sicknesse. (search)
ile at 12 of the clocke, and stood to the Westward. The 10 day we saw an Iland lying Westward some 30 leagues called Escudo, where wee came to anker on the Southside in 12 fadoms water, faire sand and good ankorage. If you come into the Easterne point, give it a birth, because of a ledge of rockes, that lyeth out there from de los Corrientes, which is a bare low cape, having a bush of trees higher than the rest some mile to the Eastward of the cape. All Cuba is full of wood on the Southside . The Spanish fleete which then were but 14 no more than we were, kept still upon our weather quarter, but dared not to come roome with us although our Admirall e, the Adventure, and the Phenix . The 28 we were in 39 degrees, and stood away for Flores , which the 8 of Aprill we saw, and the 9 came to an anker on the Southside , where we watered because the Defiance when we came in had but two buts of water. We bartered with the Portugals for some fresh victuals, and set here on s
, then I wish thee to come to anchor, untill it be day, and then call for a Pilote, that may by some meanes carie thee into harbour. I advise thee, if in the Winter time thou bee shot out of the narrowest of the Chanel of Bahama, and wouldest goe for Spaine, that thou must goe East Northeast, untill thou be in 30. degrees rather lesse then more; and then thou mayest goe East and by South, because of the variation of the Compasse. And stirring hence East Southeast, thou shalt goe on the Southside of Bermuda: and must goe with great care, because many have bene lost heere about this Island, because of their negligence. And when thou art sure thou art past this Island, then goe East Northeast, untill thou bee in the height of seven and thirtie degrees: which is in the height of the Island of Saint Marie. And going thus, and not seeing Land, but seeing the Sea to breake, make account it is the rocks called las Hormigas. And if thou thinke good to goe to Faial , thou shalt goe till tho
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, What course the Spaniards keepe from Havana to Spaine. (search)
, then I wish thee to come to anchor, untill it be day, and then call for a Pilote, that may by some meanes carie thee into harbour. I advise thee, if in the Winter time thou bee shot out of the narrowest of the Chanel of Bahama, and wouldest goe for Spaine, that thou must goe East Northeast, untill thou be in 30. degrees rather lesse then more; and then thou mayest goe East and by South, because of the variation of the Compasse. And stirring hence East Southeast, thou shalt goe on the Southside of Bermuda: and must goe with great care, because many have bene lost heere about this Island, because of their negligence. And when thou art sure thou art past this Island, then goe East Northeast, untill thou bee in the height of seven and thirtie degrees: which is in the height of the Island of Saint Marie. And going thus, and not seeing Land, but seeing the Sea to breake, make account it is the rocks called las Hormigas. And if thou thinke good to goe to Faial , thou shalt goe till tho
egrees, a very high land, but of no great length: it was the high land over Sierra Leona. Wee drewe in to the land, and found neere the shoare more water then in the offing: at the Northern end of the high land we anckered about a mile, and somewhat more from the shoare in 11. fathome. To goe into the harbor of Sierra Leona we did borrow upon the South side, having no ground in 10. fathome, halfe a mile from the shoare. Upon the Northside of this harbour is very shoale water, but on the Southside no feare, more then is to be scene. The 23. day being Sunday wee came to an ancker in the bay of fresh water, and going ashoare with our boate, wee spake with a Portugal, who tolde us that not farre off there were Negros inhabiting, and that in giving to the king a Botija of wine, and some linnen cloth, hee would suffer us to water and wood at our pleasure. But our Captaines thinking it not good to give any thing for that which they might take freely, landed, and certaine of our men wit
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