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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A compendious and briefe declaration of the journey of M. Anth. Jenkinson, from the famous citie of London into the land of Persia, passing in this same journey thorow Russia , Moscovia, and Mare Caspium, alias Hircanum, sent and imployed therein by the right worshipfull Societie of the Merchants Adventurers, for discoverie of Lands, Islans, &c. Being begun the foureteenth day of May, Anno 1561, and in the third yere of the reigne of the Queenes Majestie that now is: this present declaration being directed and written to the foresayd Societie. (search)
y, sonne to Obdolowcan king of Shirvan aforesayd, to send for me to his house, who asked me in the name of the said Sophy how I did, and whether I were in health, and after did welcome me, and invited me to dinner, whereat I had great enterteinment, and so from thence I returned to my lodging. The next day after I sent my interpreter unto the Sophies Secretarie, declaring that I had letters directed from our most gracious Sovereigne ladie the Queenes most excellent Majestie of the Realme of England , unto the sayd Sophy, and that the cause of my comming was expressed in the same letters, desiring that at convenient time I might come into his Majesties presence, who advertising the Sophy thereof, shortly after answered me that there were great affaires in hand: which being finished, I should come before his presence, willing me in the meane time to make ready my present if I had any to deliver. At this time, the great Turkes Ambassadour arrived foure dayes before my comming, who was
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes concerning this fourth voyage into Persia, begun in the moneth of July 1568. gathered by M. Richard Willes from the mouth of Master Arthur Edwards, which was Agent in the same. (search)
er with him, and standing farre off, the Sophie (sitting in a seat roiall with a great number of his noble men about him) bad him come neere, and that thrise, until he came so neere him that he might have touched him with his hand. Then the first demand that he asked him was, from what countrey he came: he answered, that he came from England. Then asked hee of his noble men, who knew any such countrey? But when Edwards saw that none of them had any intelligence of that name, he named it Inghilterra , as the Italians call England. Then one of the noble men said Londro, meaning thereby London, which name is better knowen in far countries out of Christendom, then is the name of England. When Edwards heard him name Londro, he said that that was the name of the chiefe citie of England, as was Teveris of the chiefe city of Persia. He asked him many things more, as of the realme of England, marvelling that it should be an Island of so great riches and power, as Edwards declared unto him: of
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The most solemne, and magnificent coronation of Pheodor Ivanowich, Emperour of Russia &c. the tenth of June, in the yeere 1584. seene and observed by Master Jerom Horsey gentleman, and servant to her Majesty, a man of great travell, and long experience in those parts: wherwith is also joyned the course of his journey over land from Mosco to Emden . (search)
ent the Lord Treasorer Peter Ivanowich Galavyn, and Vasili Shalkan, both of the Counsell, to them, who delivered the Emperor backe, Master Horseys speech: whereupon he was first in order (as good reason) admitted and presented the Emperor in the behalfe of the English Merchants trading thither, a present wishing him joy, and long to raigne in tranquilitie, and so kissed the Emperors hand, he accepting the present with good liking, and avouching, that for his sisters sake Queene Elizabeth of England , he would be a gracious Lord to her Merchants, in as ample maner as ever his father had ben: and being dismissed, he had the same day sent him 70. dishes of sundry kinds of meats, with 3. carts laden with al sorts of drinks very bountifully. After him was the foresayd subject of the Spanish king admitted with his present, whom the Emperor willed to be no lesse faithfull and serviceable unto him, then the Queene of Englands subjects were & had bene, and then the king of Spaines subjects
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, To the Queenes most excellent Majestie from the Lord Boris Pheodorovich Godonova. (search)
Perme, Viatsky, Bulgary, and other regions, Lord and great Duke of Novogrod in the low countrey, of Chernigo, of Rezan, Polotsko, Rostove, Jeroslave, Bealozera, and of Lifland, of Udorsky, Obdorsky, Condinsky, and all the countrey of Sibery, and commander of all the North parts, and Lord over the countrey of Iversky, and King of Grusinsky, and of the countrey of Kabardinsky, Cherchasky, and duke of Igorsky, Lord and ruler of many countreys more, &c. Most resplendent Queene Elizabeth of England , France, and Ireland , &c. his princely Majesties servant, Lord and Master of his horses, and high Steward of his house, and President of the territories of Cazan and Astracan, Boris Pheodorovich Godonova, unto your most excellent Majesty, great Ladie Queene Elizabeth, send my humble commendations. It hath pleased your Majestie to write unto me your gracious and princely letter by your servant Thomas Lind: which letter I received with all humblenesse. During the time of the abode of your me
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter from the Lord Boris Pheodorowich to the right honourable Lord William Burghley, Lord high Treasurer of England. (search)
of Sibery, and commaunder of all the North parts, and Lord over the countrey of Iversky, and King of Grusinsky, and of the countreys of Kabardinsky, Cherchasky, and Duke of Igorsky, Lord and ruler of many Countreys more &c. His princely Majesties servant, Lord and Master of his horses, and high Steward of his house, President of the territories of Cazan and Astracan, Boris Pheodorowich Godonova, to the most honourable Counseller of the most resplendent mightie great Lady Elizabeth Queene of England , France, and Ireland , William Burghley, Lord, and Knight of the Garter, high Treasurour of England, sendeth greeting. I perceive by your letter that your merchants last shippes came home in saftie, and that you have received the letters sent by them, by the hands of Francis Cherie, one from our Lord and great King of all Russia his Majesty, unto your Queenes most excellent Majesty, and one from me to her Highnesse, and one from my selfe to you: and the contents thereof you have caused
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The letters sent from the Imperiall Musulmanlike highnesse of Zuldan Murad Can, to the sacred regall Majestie of Elizabeth Queene of England , the fifteenth of March 1579, conteyning the grant of the first privileges. (search)
The letters sent from the Imperiall Musulmanlike highnesse of Zuldan Murad Can, to the sacred regall Majestie of Elizabeth Queene of England , the fifteenth of March 1579, conteyning the grant of the first privileges. IN greatnes and glory most renowmed Elizabeth, most sacred Queene, and noble prince of the most mightie worshippers of Jesus, most wise governor of the causes and affaires of the people and family of Nazareth , cloud of most pleasant raine, and sweetest fountaine of noblenesse and vertue, ladie & heire of the perpetuall happinesse & glory of the noble Realme of England (whom all sorts seeke unto and submit themselves) we wish most prosperous successe and happie ends to all your actions, and do offer unto you such pleasures and curtesies as are worthy of our mutuall and eternall familiaritie: thus ending (as best beseemeth us) our former salutations. In most friendly maner we give you to understand, that a certaine man hath come unto us in the name of your most ex
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
t of such things as are brought to you out of England by Sea, standeth a matter of great consequencn degrees more towardes the North then wee in England are, No, the Sunne never commeth neere their hendeth over and above the first computation, England , Scotland , Denmarke, Moscovia, &c. which allmoisture do not want. For as in October in England we finde temperate aire, and have in our gard so deepe, even to their antipodes. We see in England in the Summer nights, when the Sunne goeth nos be to God, all the Fleete arrived safely in England about the first of October, some in one place The 27. of this moneth we fell with sight of England . This night we had a marveilous storme and loof August we departed from Gylberts sound for England , and when we came out of the harborough thered their voyage, and so presently departed for England , without regard of their promise: my selfe noull providence of God, I shaped my course for England , & unhoped for of any, God alone releeving me[40 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage of Master Martin Frobisher, made to the West and Northwest Regions, in the yeere 1577. with a description of the Countrey, and people: Written by Master Dionise Settle. (search)
in the wind and Sunne. They dresse their meat very filthily, and eate it without salt. Their apparell is after the rudest sort of Scotland . Their money is all base. Their Church and religion is reformed according to the Scots. The fisher men of England can better declare the dispositions of those people then I: wherefore I remit other their usages to their reports, as yeerely repaires thither, in their course to and from Island for fish. We departed herehence the 8. of June, and followed ouminds with fraight sufficient for our vessels, though not our covetous desires with such knowledge of the Countrey, people, and other commodities as are before rehearsed, we departed therehence. The 17. of September we fell with the lands end of England , and so sailed to Milford Haven, from whence our Generall rode to the Court for order, to what Port or Haven to conduct the ship. We lost our two Barkes in the way homeward, the one the 29. of August, the other the 31. of the same moneth, by
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third and last voyage unto Meta Incognita, made by M. Martin Frobisher, in the yeere 1578. Written by Thomas Ellis. (search)
e fift of June we passed the Dursies, being the utmost part of Ireland to the Westward. And here it were not much amisse nor farre from our purpose, if I should a little discourse and speake of our adventures and chances by the way, as our landing at Plimmouth, as also the meeting certaine poore men, which were robbed and spoyled of all that they had by Pirates and Rovers: amongst whom was a man of Bristow, on whom our Generall used his liberality, and sent him away with letters into England . But because such things are impertinent to the matter, I will returne (without any more mentioning of the same) to that from the which I have digressed and swarved, I meane our ships now sailing on the surging seas, sometime passing at pleasure with a wished Easterne wind, sometime hindered of our course againe by the Westerne blasts, untill the 20. day of the foresayd moneth of June, on which day in the morning we fell with Frizeland, which is a very hie and cragged land and was almost
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes framed by M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple Esquire, given to certaine Gentlemen that went with M. Frobisher in his Northwest discoverie, for their directions: And not unfit to be committed to print, considering the same may stirre up considerations of these and of such other things, not unmeete in such new voyages as may be attempted hereafter. (search)
and fetch home the supply of the wants of the seate. Such Navigation so to be employed shall, besides the supply of wants, be able to encounter with forreine force. And for that in the ample vent of such things as are brought to you out of England by Sea, standeth a matter of great consequence, it behoveth that all humanitie and curtesie and much forbearing of revenge to the Inland people be used: so shall you have firme amitie with your neighbours, so shall you have their inland commoditht not enjoy any traffique with the next neighbours, nor any victuals: yet might they victuall themselves of fish to serve very necessitie, and enter into amitie with the enemies of their next neighbours, and so have vent of their marchandize of England & also have victual, or by meanes hereupon to be used, to force the next neighbours to amitie. And keeping a navy at the setling place, they should find out along the tract of the land to have traffique, and at divers Islands also. And so this f
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