hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: December 22, 1860., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 44 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
or noise, gently as the operations of nature, makes and unmakes laws. Let this opinion be felt in its Christian might, and the Fugitive Slave Bill will become everywhere upon our soil a dead letter. No lawyer will aid it by counsel; no citizen will become its agent; it will die of inanition—like a spider beneath an exhausted receiver. Oh! it were well the tidings should spread throughout the land, that here in Massachusetts this accursed Bill has found no servants. Sire, I have found in Bayonne honest citizens and brave soldiers only; but not one executioner, was the reply of the governor of that place, to the royal mandate from Charles IX. of France, ordering the Massacre of St. Bartholomew. But it rests with you, my fellow-citizens, by your words and your example, by your calm determinations, and your devoted lives, to do this work. From a humane, just, and religious people shall spring a Public Opinion, to keep perpetual guard over the liberties of all within our borders.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
te, I night ask fearlessly, how many there are, even in this body—if indeed there, be a single senator— who would stoop to any such service? Until some one rises and openly confesses his willingness to become a slave-hunter, I will not believe there can be one [here Sumner paused, but nobody rose]; and yet honorable and chivalrous senators have rushed headlong to denounce me because I openly declared my repudiation of a service at which every manly bosom must revolt. Sire, I have found in Bayonne good citizens and brave soldiers, but not one executioner, was the noble utterance of the governor of that place to Charles IX. of France in response to the royal edict for the massacre of St. Bartholomew; and such a spirit, I trust, will yet animate the people of this country when pressed to the service of dogs. He denied Butler's right to ejaculate a lecture at Massachusetts or himself on constitutional obligations, coming as he did from a State which had expelled the venerable Samue
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
found, after two efforts, the tomb and effigies of Montaigne; in the evening tired, tired, tired; obliged to take to my bed. June 1. Left Bordeaux by rail for Bayonne. Dreary country, flat, with peasants on stilts. On reaching Bayonne, went out to Biarritz, the famous watering-place, where the emperor has built a chateau. Bayonne, went out to Biarritz, the famous watering-place, where the emperor has built a chateau. June 2. Left Bayonne early by rail for Dax, where at breakfast met a Frenchman who insisted upon knowing my age and business; he set me down at thirty-five, perhaps thirty-eight. The Eaux-Chaudes there are striking. Thence by diligence to Pan, where I arrived at evening; the view here is far more beautiful than I had expected,—I Bayonne early by rail for Dax, where at breakfast met a Frenchman who insisted upon knowing my age and business; he set me down at thirty-five, perhaps thirty-eight. The Eaux-Chaudes there are striking. Thence by diligence to Pan, where I arrived at evening; the view here is far more beautiful than I had expected,—I think the most beautiful thing of the kind which I have seen in France. June 3. This whole day passed at Pau, where I saw the castle, and enjoyed the Pyrenees capped with snow. June 4. Started at eight o'clock in the morning on the outside of the diligence for Eaux-Bonnes in the Pyrenees; as an accidental companion was a prie
He ought to go to Utah. --During a recent trial at Bayonne, France, it was proved that a wealthy merchant, 60 years of age, had nine different mistresses and three wives!
were to occupy-Portugal, and 40,000 more French troops were to be assembled at Bayonne, to march also to Portugal, in case those already there were attacked by the Eost disquietude to Ferdinand, who immediately sent a deputation to Napoleon at Bayonne. In the meantime Murat held a communication with the old King, who assured hill further. He allowed himself to be persuaded by Savony to take a journey to Bayonne, and place him self in the hands of Napoleon. The journey was taken, and he hable to bend Ferdinand to his purpose, Napoleon determined to bring Charles to Bayonne. Murat, after some trouble, induced the old King to go, accompanied by his co who sent the whole Royal party into France, and brought his brother Joseph to Bayonne, to be King of Spain. This is the darkest transaction in the life of Napoleonn every part. A Spanish force sent to get possession of the road leading from Bayonne to Madrid was out to pieces by Bes. sieres at Rio Seco. But this triump
participated. It was an attempt to make a flank march in the face of an enemy already in position. It was a gross blunder of his own, and resulted in an overwhelming defeat. Wellington saw the blunder, and attacked him while he was perpetrating it.--But for that blunder he would not have been attacked. Clausel saved the army, which his stupidity had nearly destroyed. One month before the battle Napoleon, at Dresden, on his way to Russia, having in his hand the map of the country and the last dispatch of Marmont, saw from the tenor of the latter that he must inevitably he beaten, and wrote to the Minister of War at Faris, directing, him to send 20,000 men to Bayonne, to remedy the disaster which he foresaw.--After his defeat he was removed, and then commenced his life-long hatred of his benefactor. Nevertheless, this book, apart from what personally concerns Marmont himself and Napoleon, the object of his hatred, is no doubt, as we have said, valuable to the military man.
1 2