Your search returned 2,608 results in 649 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Experiences and reasons of the Sphere, to proove all partes of the worlde habitable, and thereby to confute the position of the five Zones. (search)
st eight of the clocke in the morning, the Sunne will be in the East about 38. degrees above the Horizon, because there it riseth alwayes at sixe of the clocke, and mooveth every houre 15. degrees, and so high very neere will it be with us at London the said eleventh day of March at noone. And therefore looke what force the Sunne hath with us at noone, the eleventh of March, the same force it seemeth to have under the Equinoctial at half an houre past eight in the morning, or rather lesse f past eight under the Equinoctiall, then is with us at noone: a fortiori. But in March we are not onely contented to have the Sunne shining, but we greatly desire the same. Likewise the 11 of June, the Sunne in our Meridian is 62 degrees high at London : and under the Equinoctiall it is so high after 10 of the clocke, and seeing then it is beneficial with us; a fortiori it is beneficiall to them after 10 of the clocke. And thus have wee measured the force of the Sunnes greatest heate, the ho
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the temperature of colde Regions all the Sommer long, and also how in Winter the same is habitable, especially to the inhabitants thereof. (search)
se countreys to be almost 24 degrees. And so high is the Sun at noone to us in London about the 29 of October, being in the 15 degree of Scorpio, and likewise the 2ing in the 15 of Aquarius. Therefore looke what force the Sun at noone hath in London the 29 of October, the same force of heat it hath, to them that dwell under thlde night; so that if the heat of the Sunne at noone could be well measured in London (which is very hard to do, because of the long nights which ingender great moiarrived in England in Harwich the 2 of October following, and thence came to London 1576, where he was highly commended of all men for his great and notable attemas kept in respect of the place from whence it came. After his arrivall in London , being demanded of sundry his friends what thing he had brought them home out matter being called in some question, it was brought to certaine Goldfiners in London to make assay thereof, who gave out that it held golde, and that very richly f
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage of M. John Davis, undertaken in June 1585. for the discoverie of the Northwest passage, Written by M. John Janes Marchant, sometimes servant to the worshipfull Master William Sanderson. (search)
The first voyage of M. John Davis, undertaken in June 1585. for the discoverie of the Northwest passage, Written by M. John Janes Marchant, sometimes servant to the worshipfull Master William Sanderson. CERTAINE Honourable personages and worthy Gentlemen of the Court & Countrey, with divers worshipful Marchants of London and of the West Countrey, mooved with desire to advance Gods glory and to seeke the good of their native Countrey, consulting together of the likelyhood of the Discoverie of the Northwest passage, which heretofore had bene attempted, but unhappily given over by accidents unlooked for, which turned the enterprisers from their principall purpose, resolved after good deliberation, to put downe their adventures to provide for necessarie shipping, and a fit man to be chiefe Conductour of this so hard an enterprise. The setting forth of this Action was committed by the adventurers, especially to the care of M. William Sanderson Marchant of London, who was so forward therei
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The relation of the course which the Sunshine a barke of fiftie tunnes, and the Northstarre a small pinnesse, being two vessels of the fleete of M. John Davis, helde after hee had sent them from him to discover the passage betweene Groenland and Island, written by Henry Morgan servant to M. William Sanderson of London. (search)
heir fish in the Sun, and when they are dry, they packe them up in the top of their houses. If we would goe thither to fishing more then we doe, we should make it a very good voyage: for wee got an hundreth greene fish in one morning. Wee found heere two English men with a shippe, which came out of England about Easter day of this present yeere 1586, and one of them came aboord of us, and brought us two lambs. The English mans name was M. John Roydon of Ipswich marchant: hee was bound for London with his ship. And this is the summe of that which I observed in Island. We departed from Island the sixteenth day of June in the morning, and our course was Northwest, and we saw on the coast two small barkes going to an harborough: we went not to them, but saw them a farre off. Thus we continued our course unto the end of this moneth. The third day of July we were in betweene two firme lands of yce, and passed in betweene them all that day untill it was night: and then the Master turne
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third voyage Northwestward, made by M. John Davis Gentleman, as chiefe captaine & Pilot generall, for the discovery of a passage to the Isles of the Moluccas, or the coast of China , in the yeere 1587. Written by M. John Janes. (search)
had bene men of warre, but we hailed them, and after a little conference, we desired the Master to carie our letters for London directed to my uncle Sanderson, who promised us a safe deliverie. And after wee had heaved them a lead and a line, wheinto the Sea, and so all our labour and theirs also was lost; notwithstanding they promised to certifie our departure at London , and so we departed, and the same day we had sight of Silley. The 22. the wind was at Northeast by East with faire weathinnes. The 17. we began to set up the pinnesse that Peerson framed at Dartmouth , with the boords which hee brought from London . The 18. Peerson and the Carpenters of the ships began to set on the plankes. The 19. as we went about an Island, wermidnight the compasse set to the variation of 28. degrees to the Westward. Now having coasted the land, which wee called London coast, from the 21. of this present, till the 30. the Sea open all to the Westwards and Northwards, the land on starboor
trust in God. The 21. we met with the Red Lion of London, which came from the coast of Spaine, which was afrayd that we had bene men of warre, but we hailed them, and after a little conference, we desired the Master to carie our letters for London directed to my uncle Sanderson, who promised us a safe deliverie. And after wee had heaved them a lead and a line, whereunto wee had made fast our letters, before they could get them into the ship, they fell into the Sea, and so all our labour and theirs also was lost; notwithstanding they promised to certifie our departure at London , and so we departed, and the same day we had sight of Silley. The 22. the wind was at Northeast by East with faire weather, and so the 23. and 24. the like. The 25. we layd our ships on the Lee for the Sunneshine, who was a romaging for a leake, they had 500. strokes at the pumpe in a watch, the wind at Northwest. The 26. and 27. wee had faire weather, but this 27. the pinnesses foremast was blowen
the clocke after nonne, the people came presently to us after the old maner, with crying Ilyaoute, and shewing us Seales skinnes. The 17. we began to set up the pinnesse that Peerson framed at Dartmouth , with the boords which hee brought from London . The 18. Peerson and the Carpenters of the ships began to set on the plankes. The 19. as we went about an Island, were found blacke Pumise stones, and salt kerned on the rockes, very white and glistering. This day also the Master of the Sunneelves in 72. degrees and 12 minutes of latitude both at noone and at night, the Sunne being 5. degrees above the Horizon. At midnight the compasse set to the variation of 28. degrees to the Westward. Now having coasted the land, which wee called London coast, from the 21. of this present, till the 30. the Sea open all to the Westwards and Northwards, the land on starboord side East from us, the winde shifted to the North, whereupon we left that shore, naming the same Hope Sanderson, and shaped
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Traverse-Booke made by M. John Davis in his passage. (search)
resent we got cleere of the Streights, having coasted the South shore, the land trending from hence S. W. by S. Noone the 30 24 S. S. W. 22 63     This day we coasted the shore, a banke of ice lying thereupon. Also this 30 of July in the afternoone we crossed over the entrance or mouth of a great inlet or passage, being 20 leagues broad, and situate betweene 62 & 63 degrees. In which place we had 8 or 9 great rases, currents or overfals, lothsomly crying like the rage of the waters under London bridge, and bending their course into the sayd gulfe.   31 24 S. by W. 27 62   N. W. This 31 at noone, comming close by a foreland or great cape, we fell into a mighty rase, where an island of ice was carried by the force of the current as fast as our barke could saile with lum wind, all sailes bearing. This cape as it was the most Southerly limit of the gulfe which we passed over the 30 day of this moneth, so was it the North promontory or first beginning of another very great inlet, who
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A report of Master John Davis of his three Voyages made for the discovery of the Northwest passage, taken out of a Treatise of his, Intituled the worlds Hydrographicall description. (search)
for thrise I was that waye imployed for the discovery of this notable passage, by the honourable care and some charge of Syr Francis Walsingham knight, principall secretary to her Majestie, with whom divers noble men and worshipfull marchants of London joyned in purse and willingnesse for the furtherance of that attempt, but when his honour dyed the voyage was friendlesse, and mens mindes alienated from adventuring therein. In my first voyage not experienced of the nature of those climates,le countenance from his honour, advising me to prosecute the action, of which his Lordship conceived a very good opinion. The next yere, although divers of the adventurers fell from the Action, as all the Westerne marchants, and most of those in London : yet some of the adventurers both honorable & worshipfull continued their willing favor and charge, so that by this meanes the next yere two shippes were appointed for the fishing and one pinnesse for the discoverie. Departing from Dartmout
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages of the English Nation to Newfoundland , to the Isles of Ramea, and the Isles of Assumption otherwise called Natiscotec, situate at the mouth of the River of Canada, and to the coastes of Cape Briton, and Arambec, corruptly called Norumbega, with the Patents, letters, and advertisements thereunto belonging. (search)
ecters in the aforesaid voyage. And it hath bene tolde me by sir Martine Frobisher, and M. Richard Allen, a knight of the Sepulchre, that a Canon of Saint Paul in London , which was a great Mathematician, and a man indued with wealth, did much advance the action, and went therein himselfe in person, but what his name was I cannot lnsailes of king Henry the 8 and king Edward the sixth, father to the worshipfull M. William Wade now Clerke of the privie Counsell, M. Oliver Dawbeney marchant of London , M. Joy afterward gentleman of the Kings Chappel, with divers other of good account. The whole number that went in the two tall ships aforesaid, to wit, the Trinind M. Rastall and other Gentlemen of the voyage were very friendly entertained: after that they came to the Earle of Bathe at Bathe, and thence to Bristoll, so to London . M. Buts was so changed in the voyage with hunger and miserie, that sir William his father and my Lady his mother knew him not to be their sonne, untill they foun
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...