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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The breastworks at Culp's Hill. (search)
rom our front, and our men went to Rock Creek for water. Of the disastrous consequences to the Union army, had Lee succeeded in penetrating our lines and placing himself square across the Baltimore pike in rear of the center and right wing of the entire army, there can be no question. Fortunately it was averted by the steady and determined courage of the five New York regiments above named, The assailants were Johnson's division of Ewell's (Second) Corps, consisting of twenty-two regiments, organized into four brigades — Steuart's, Nicholls's, Jones's, and Walker's — the latter being the famous Stonewall Brigade, first commanded by Stonewall Jackson. To the discernment of General Slocum, who saw the danger to which the army would be exposed by the movement ordered, and who took the responsibility of modifying the orders which he had received, is due the honor of having saved the army from a great and perhaps fatal disaster. At close quarters on the First day at Gettysburg
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.47 (search)
al Reynolds were defeated and driven through Gettysburg by portions of Hill's and Ewell's corps, hasof the most memorable battle of the war; for Gettysburg was the turning-point in the great struggle.arly two years. On the other hand, it was at Gettysburg that the right arm of the South was broken, was her shield. When the fight began at Gettysburg on the 1st of July, three brigades of Hood'street, I moved as rapidly as possible toward Gettysburg, and arrived there shortly before noon, havitorious. The Federal troops retired through Gettysburg and took position along the height east of tlves itself into this: General Lee failed at Gettysburg on the 2d and 3d of July because he made hisduring the war. Looking up the valley toward Gettysburg, the hills on either side were capped with clry directed its course up the valley toward Gettysburg, passing between the position of our artille cloud that hung so darkly over the field of Gettysburg after the disastrous charge of Pickett. L[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Kershaw's brigade at Gettysburg. (search)
Kershaw's brigade at Gettysburg. by J. B. Kershaw, Major-General, C. S. A. My brigade, composed of South Carolinians, The 2d, 3d, 7th, 1st of July we reached the top of the range of hills overlooking Gettysburg, from which could be seen and heard the smoke and din of battle, aging in the distance. We encamped about midnight two miles from Gettysburg, on the left of the Chambersburg pike. On the 2d we were up and etention from trains in the way, we reached the high grounds near Gettysburg, and moved to the right of the Third Corps, Kershaw's brigade beie. These men were brave veterans who had fought from Bull Run to Gettysburg, and knew the strength of their position, and so held it as long e de Paris terms it, the want of coordination, caused the loss of Gettysburg to the Confederates. It will be seen, too, that there was no losdivision, from the day it left Culpeper to that of its arrival at Gettysburg. If any ensued after that, it was due to circumstances wholly un
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's right wing at Gettysburg. (search)
Lee's right wing at Gettysburg. by James Longstreet, Lieutenant-General, C. S. A. Cettysburg lies partly between Seminary Ridge on the west and Cemetery Ridge on the ground on our left with a view Lutheran Church on Chambersburg street, Gettysburg, used as a hospital. From a photograph. to making the attack at that point.hen the order was given for Pickett to advance. [See p. 355.] That day at Gettysburg was one of the saddest of my life. I foresaw what my men would meet and woulies remained in position, the Confederates on Seminary Ridge extending around Gettysburg, the left also drawn back, the Federals on Cemetery Ridge, until the night ofe already made, wish that I, who would and could have saved every man lost at Gettysburg, should now be shot to death. If we had made the move around the Federal l dislodged Meade without a single blow; but even if we had been successful at Gettysburg, and had driven the Federals out of their stronghold, we should have won a fr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.50 (search)
The charge of Pickett, Pettigrew, and Trimble. from the bivouac of march, 1887, and editorially revised.--editors. by J. B. Smith. In an address delivered by Colonel Andrew Cowan to his comrades at Gettysburg on the 3d of July, 1886, he, like nearly every other speaker and writer, ascribes all the praise of the Confederate charge of the third day to Pickett's division. He says: Beyond the wall nothing but the gray-clad Virginians. He speaks of no other troops except Pickett's. Some writers have gone so far as to say Pickett made the immortal charge with five thousand Virginians, etc. Pickett's division was fresh, not having engaged the enemy on the first or second day, while the other troops of the assaulting body fought on the previous days with unsurpassed bravery, and some of the brigades were almost annihilated. The grand assaulting column was formed in three divisions, and the divisions were commanded and led to the slaughter by Pickett, Pettigrew, and Trimble. Gen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A reply to General Longstreet. (search)
to General Longstreet. by William Allan, Colonel, C. S. A. General Longstreet's account of Gettysburg [see pp. 244, 339] is notable for its mistakes as well as for its attitude toward General Lee his official report he says that McLaws's division . . . reached Marsh Creek, four miles from Gettysburg, a little after dark, and Hood's division [except Law's brigade] got within nearly the same dihe town about 12 o'clock at night. Hood says he was with his staff in front of the heights of Gettysburg shortly after daybreak on the 2d, and his troops were close behind. Kershaw (of McLaws's division) says in his official report that on the 1st of July they marched to a point on the Gettysburg road some two miles from that place, going into camp at 12 P. M. General Longstreet, to explain into battle. Meantime on the Federal side Hancock's corps, which had camped three miles from Gettysburg, reached the field by 6 or 7 A. M.; Sickles's two brigades that had been left at Emmitsburg ca
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The great charge and artillery fighting at Gettysburg. (search)
The great charge and artillery fighting at Gettysburg. by E. Porter Alexander, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. The Reserve Artillery of Longstreet's corps, in the Gettysburg campaign, consisted of the Washington Artillery of New Orleans, then under Major Eshleman, nine guns, and my own battalion of twenty-six guns. Besides thesee a proper view of the situation, as one of our good chaplains used to pray, there was a very natural anxiety to know how the enemy had fought the day before at Gettysburg. As we met the wounded and staff-officers who had been in the action, I remember many questions asked on that subject. There was no great comfort to be derively hard time fighting infantry and superior metal nearly all day, and losing about eighty-five men and sixty horses. Sharpsburg they called artillery hell. At Gettysburg the losses in the same command, including the infantry that volunteered to help serve the guns, were 144 men and 116 horses, nearly all by artillery fire. Some
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
The third day at Gettysburg. continued from p. 313.--editors. by Henry J. Hunt, Brevet Major-Gectures that follow are from the Cyclorama of Gettysburg, by permission of the National Panorama CompCress's Ridge, two and a half miles east of Gettysburg, Stuart commanded a view of the roads in reaf the clump of trees. from the Cyclorama of Gettysburg. In this-hand-to-hand conflict General Ardvantage to Lee and disadvantage to Meade of Gettysburg were made manifest. General Meade has bee 4th--both armies being still in position at Gettysburg — Kilpatrick had a sharp encounter with the notwithstanding his own recent experience at Gettysburg, where all the enemy's attacks on even partis and expectations excited by the victory of Gettysburg were as unreasonable as the fears that had p communicate in any other way. Your fight at Gettysburg met with universal approbation of all milita at Williamsport very different from that at Gettysburg. When I left Frederick it was with the firm[1 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., General Hancock and the artillery at Gettysburg. (search)
General Hancock and the artillery at Gettysburg. I. By Francis A. Walker, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. V. General Hunt, in his article on The Third day at Gettysburg [see p. 375], criticises General Hancock's conduct of his artillery, on the ground that his directing the Second Corps batteries to continue firing throughGettysburg [see p. 375], criticises General Hancock's conduct of his artillery, on the ground that his directing the Second Corps batteries to continue firing throughout the Confederate cannonade was both an encroachment upon his own (General Hunt's) proper authority, as chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac, and an act of bad policy. On the latter point he says: Had my instructions been followed here, as they were by McGilvery, I do not believe that Pickett's division would have temper of troops which should qualify him, equally with Hancock, to judge what was required to keep them in heart and courage under the Confederate cannonade at Gettysburg, and to bring them up to the final struggle, prepared in spirit to meet the fearful ordeal of Longstreet's charge. Hancock had full authority over that line of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Repelling Lee's last blow at Gettysburg. (search)
Repelling Lee's last blow at Gettysburg. I. By Edmund Rice, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, U. S. A. The brigades of Harrow, Webb, and Hall, of Gibbon's division, Hancock's corps, occupied the crest on Cemetery Ridge on July 3d. The right of Hall's and the left of Webb's brigades were in a clump of trees, called by the enemy td to me that he was wounded in both thighs. Iv. By L. E. Bicknell, Lieutenant, 1st Mass. Sharp-Shooters. upon the excursion of Massachusetts veterans to Gettysburg, I found a monument in Ziegler's Grove to the 88th Pennsylvania Volunteers. It marks the spot where our infantry were being rapidly cut down by the enemy's shahey were strangers to me and I have just learned that the 39th, 111th, 125th, and 126th New-York were added to the Third Division, Second Corps, on the march to Gettysburg. I left the army after the battle, and so had no opportunity to learn afterward. With regard to the blow struck on Pettigrew's left by the 8th Ohio Regiment,
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