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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
nd commenced fortifying. Discovered signs of the enemy withdrawing in the night; we advanced the picket at daylight in the morning, and found the works deserted. Marched at 8 a. m. of the 5th and took the line of railroad, following Vood's division. The enemy crossed the Chattahoochee, and we camped near Vining's Station, where we lay until the morning of the 7th, when we moved two miles to the left and camped. On the 9th marched at 6 a. m.. in advance of the division, fourteen miles to Roswell : after a short halt forded the Chattahoochee River and relieved Minty's brigade of cavalry. Next day, 10th, formed connection with the First Brigade and fortified. Were relieved this p. in. by a brigade of the Sixteenth Corps, and on the 11th crossed the Chattahoochee and camped. July 12, returned to old camp near Powers' Ferry, and on the morning of 13th crossed the river at Powers' Ferry and camped about three miles out, putting brigade in position in two lines and constructing wo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
day we celebrated the glorious 4th of July by skirmishing nearly all day, and succeeded in capturing some rifle-pits and several prisoners; had 6 of our men wounded during the day. The enemy falling back in the night, compelled us to follow them the 5th, in order that Johnston might get Sherman just where he wanted him, viz, on the north side the Chattahoochee River, and himself on the south side, and the (of course) bridges burned. On the 9th we marched with the brigade and division to Roswell, a small manufacturing town, sixteen miles up the river, and there we forded the river and camped and threw up works about one mile south of the river; were relieved on the 11th and recrossed the river, and the 12th marched back to our camp at Vining's Station. On the 13th we crossed the river and bivouacked until the 18th, when there was another general movement upon the enemy, driving him, of course. On the 20th we crossed Peach Tree Creek and had gone but a short distance before the en
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 52 (search)
unded. On the 17th the enemy decamped to their intrenchments at Kenesaw, where nothing except changes of line and light skirmishing occurred till the 27th, when we participated in an assault on the enemy's line, losing 4 officers and 39 men. The losses from the 15th to this time were 11 men killed and wounded. The enemy left this line on the night of the 2d of July, and we marched to the Chattahoochee without further hinderance than a show of resistance on the 4th. On the 10th marched to Roswell, eighteen miles up the river, and crossed, returning to our position in the corps on the 13th, and again crossed the river on the 14th, and rested three days. Marched on the 18th in support of the skirmish line. On the 20th supported and reenforced the Eighty-eighth Illinois, First Brigade. Afterward formed line, facing to the rear, and built breast-works. Casualties, 5 wounded. On the 22d confronted the enemy in their fortifications around Atlanta, where we remained until the night of t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 54 (search)
commanded by Maj. S. L. Coulter, took an active part, but the assault proved fruitless, no part of the works being gained. The casualties in the regiment in this assault were 1 enlisted man killed and 4 enlisted men wounded. On the 2d of July the enemy withdrew from Kenesaw Mountain, and the day following, passing through Marietta, again confronted the enemy west of and near the Chattahoochee River. While the army was in this position the regiment accompanied the brigade and division to Roswell, sixteen miles up the river, and again on its return to Vining's Station, near which it crossed over and fortified on the eastern bank of the river, July 13. We again moved to Buck Head on the 18th instant, where a new line of works was completed. From this moved forward across Peach Tree Creek; had advanced but a short distance from the stream when the enemy made a sudden and violent attack. Two companies, H and K, Capt. S. M. Wolff commanding, were thrown forward as skirmishers in a pi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
ht, the One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at 6 a. m. and bivouacked at five miles below Marietta near the railroad, confronting the enemy. July 4, changed position and fortified; the enemy withdrew during the night. July 5, marched at 7 a. m. and bivouacked at night near Vining's Station. July 6, 7, and 8, rested in bivouac, men washing, &c. July 9, 10, and 11, moved with the division to support McCook's cavalry, which had effected a crossing of the Chattahcochee River at Roswell, twelve miles above Vining's. July 12, 13, and 14, returned to Vining's Station, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Powers' Ferry, and constructed breast-works at a point two miles farther south. July 15, 16, and 17, remained quietly in camp; no enemy appeared in our immediate front. July 18, the entire command moved at 5 a. m.; the One hundred and twenty-fifth was deployed as skirmishers, and was supported by the Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Ohio, and Third Kentucky Infantry. Encountere
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
ieutenant Burton, was engaged in three skirmishes, with credit to the lieutenant commanding. July 19, the Sixth Ohio Light Battery and Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, engaged the enemy upon the Atlanta and Buck Head road, driving a battery from two positions. At sundown Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, were placed in position on the left of the Atlanta and Buck Head road. July 20, the Fifth Indiana Battery was engaged on the Roswell and Atlanta road. Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, marched with the Second Division on the main Atlanta road, when that division was charged by the enemy. Both batteries acquitted themselves in the most prompt and creditable manner. July 21, by General Howard's order, Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, was placed in position one and a half miles to the right of the Fourth Army Corps, and played upon a column of the enemy then
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 87 (search)
the morning of July 3, the enemy having evacuated, I moved with the division through Marietta and went into camp about four miles from that place. On July 4 took up position on General Newton's line, but did no firing. On July 5 I moved to the Chattahoochee River and took a position, by command of Captain Bridges, on a hill commanding the crossing near that point and the enemy's pontoon. Remained in this position, firing occasionally, until the 9th, when I marched with General Newton to Roswell, where I remained until the 12th, when I returned to Brown's Ferry. July 13, I crossed the Chattahoochee River and put four guns in position on General Newton's line. On the 18th I moved with the division to Buck Head, and was placed on General Newton's left. On the 19th I marched with General Newton from Buck Head to Peach Tree Creek, and placed my guns in position near the bridge on the Marietta road. On the 20th I moved the battery across Peach Tree Creek, and placed four guns on Gene
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
enemy out of Tunnel Hill and within their works at Buzzard Roost Pass, I advanced my line, swinging to the left to conform to the movement of Davis' troops, and again formed line of battle as before, upon his right, my right brigade covering the Trickum road, near Widow Rogers' house. In this position my troops bivouacked for the night, strong pickets being thrown out to a considerable distance on all the roads in the direction of Trickum and Villanow. The 8th was occupied in maneuvering in fTrickum and Villanow. The 8th was occupied in maneuvering in front of Buzzard Roost, my final position being with my left resting near the high knob, known to us as Signal Hill, and my line stretching southwardly, so as to command and practically close up all roads leading out of Buzzard Roost Gap to the west and southwest. Toward evening I caused a section to be placed in position on the ridge which terminated the open field to the westward of the gap, and opened upon a line of the enemy's works beyond the pass. This, with the advance of part of Genera
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 164 (search)
ion until July 3, when, the enemy having evacuated, we moved about five miles south of Marietta and camped. July 4, received orders to proceed with my brigade to Marietta and garrison that town, with instructions to preserve public and private property as I found it. These orders were strictly and faithfully obeyed; besides, the brigade did a large amount of work in policing the town and doing guard and picket duty; in receiving and sending North a large number of factory employes from Roswell and other places. July 13, rejoined our division at Vining's Station. July 16, the Second Minnesota Veteran Volunteers detached and ordered to Marietta. July 17, crossed the Chattahoochee River and moved forward, crossing Peach Tree Creek on the night of the 19th; took a position on the ridge south of said creek and built intrenchments. July 20, my skirmishers moved forward and occupied the enemy's advanced works in our front. Afterward the Thirty-fifth Ohio was sent forward as skirmish
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
telegraphed General Thomas that no attack, excepting one coming suddenly from the direction of the match factory on the Roswell road, can affect our position. Two regiments are guarding the breast-works on the Roswell road. 3.10 p. m., received iRoswell road. 3.10 p. m., received instructions from General Thomas to order our batteries to demonstrate and to engage the enemy at all points along our lines during the day, as Schofield, who crossed the Sandtown road at 12.50 p. m., and attacked the enemy in his works without succeugh the day very small, not over 3 men wounded. At 1 p. m. received instructions from General Thomas to picket well the Roswell road in front of the breast-works. This was done two or three days ago, and such picketing still continues to be done. wo regiments at once to report to General Kimball (to report to him at daylight), and for them to move to a point on the Roswell road near Kimball's left. 1.30 a. m., telegraphed to General Thomas the substance of Kimball's report. 4.30 a. m., sen
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