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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 38 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 36 6 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 34 34 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 20 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) or search for Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 54 results in 28 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hessians. (search)
152 Returned in the autumn of 1783984 ——— Did not return168 Total number sent29,867 Total number returned17,313 ——— Total number of those who did not return12,554 Of the 12.554 who did not return Mr. Lowell's estimate is as follows: Killed and died of wounds1,200 Died of illness and accident6,354 Deserted5,000 ——— Total12,554 estimate of the losses sustained by the Germans in the principal battles of the Revolutionary War. KilledWounded.Missing. Long Island225 Sept. 15, 1776216 Sept. 16, 177611 Oct. 9 to Oct. 23 (including Chatterton Hill)136323 Fort Washington56276 Trenton1778 Assanpink (Jan. 2, 1777)411 Burgoyne's Campaign to Oct. 6, 1777164284 Burgoyne's Campaign from Oct. 7 to 162575 Skirmish, Sept. 3, 1777119 Brandywine, Chasseurs739 Brandywine, other Hessians216 Red Bank8222960 Newport199613 Stono Ferry934 Charleston1162 Springfield2575 Baton Rouge258 Pensacola1545 Guildford Courthouse15694 Yorktown5313127
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Immigration. (search)
nies into South Carolina, where immigration was encouraged, because the white people were alarmed by the preponderance of the slave population. Bounties were offered to immigrants, and many Irish and Germans settled in the upper districts of that province. Enriched by the labor of numerous slaves, South Carolina was regarded as the wealthiest of the colonies. Settlers also passed into the new province of east Florida. A body of emigrants from the Roanoke settled in west Florida, about Baton Rouge; and some Canadians went into Louisiana, for they were unwilling to live under English rule. A colony of Greeks from the shores of the Mediterranean settled at what is still known as the inlet of New Smyrna, in Florida. And while these movements were going on there were evidences of a rapid advance in wealth and civilization in the older communities. At that time the population and production of Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina had unprecedented increase, and it was called their
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnston, William Preston 1831- (search)
federate army as major of the 1st Kentucky Regiment. In 1862 he was appointed by President Davis his aide-de-camp with the rank of colonel. When Lee surrendered Colonel Johnston remained with the President, and was captured with him. After his release he lived a year in Canada and then resumed law practice in Louisville. In 1867, when General Lee was made president of Washington and Lee University, Colonel Johnston was appointed Professor of English History and Literature there, where he remained till 1877. During 1880-83 he was president of the Louisiana State University and the Agricultural and Mechanical College at Baton Rouge. In 1883, when Tulane University, in New Orleans, was founded, he was elected its president, and served as such till his death, in Lexington, Va., July 16, 1899. His publications include Life of Albert Sidney Johnston; The prototype of Hamlet; The Johnstons of Salisbury; also the poems, My Garden walk; Pictures of the patriarchs; and Seekers after God.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
hdrew to their ships and departed. See Jackson, Andrew; New Orleans. In the legislature of Louisiana, assembled at Baton Rouge in special session, Dec. 10, 1860, the Union sentiment was powerful, yet not sufficiently so to arrest mischief to thethe popular vote was small, but it was of such a complexion that the Confederates were hopeful. The convention met at Baton Rouge, Jan. 23. The legislature had convened there on the 21st. The number of delegates in the convention was 130. Ex-Gov.issippi, below the city, then in charge of Major Beauregard; also Fort Pike, on Lake Pontchartrain, and the arsenal at Baton Rouge. A part of General Palfrey's division went down the river in a steam-vessel, and on the evening of Jan. 10, 1861, the0 in number, under Colonel Walton, on the evening of Dec. 9, in a steamvessel, and on the following evening arrived at Baton Rouge to seize the arsenal, then in command of Major Haskin. He was compelled to surrender it on the 11th. By this act the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Orleans. (search)
. Louisiana was saved. The news of the victory created intense joy throughout the country. State legislatures and other bodies thanked Jackson and his brave men. A small medal was struck in commemoration of the event and circulated among the people. Congress voted the thanks of the nation to Jackson, and ordered a commemorative gold medal to be given to him. In the Civil War. The national government resolved during the winter of 1861-62 to repossess itself of Mobile, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Galveston, and to attempt to acquire control of the lower Mississippi and Texas. The Department of the Gulf was created, which included all these points, and Gen. Benjamin F. Butler (q. v.) was placed in command of it. It was proposed to send a competent land and naval force first to capture New Orleans. General McClellan did not think the plan feasible, for it would take 50,000 men, and he was unwilling to spare a man from his army of more than 200,000 men lying around Washington.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Porter, William David 1809-1864 (search)
Porter, William David 1809-1864 Naval officer; born in New Orleans, La., March 10, 1809; a son of David Porter; entered the navy in 1823. In the sloop-of-war St. Mary, on the Pacific Station, when the Civil War broke out, he was wrongly suspected of disloyalty. He was ordered to duty on the Mississippi River, in fitting out a gunboat fleet, and was put in command of the Essex, which took part in the attacks on Forts Henry and Donelson, when he was severely scalded. He fought his way past all the batteries between Cairo and New Orleans, taking part in the attack on Vicksburg. He caused the destruction of the Confederate ram Arkansas, near Baton Rouge, and assisted in the attack on Port Hudson. For these services he was made commodore in July, 1862. His feeble health prevented his doing much afterwards. He died in New York City, May 1, 1864.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Port Hudson, capture of (search)
ulf (Dec. 18, 1862), he determined to attempt to remove this obstruction to the navigation of the Mississippi. He sent General Grover with 10,000 men to occupy Baton Rouge, but the advance on Port Hudson was delayed, because it would require a larger force than Banks could then spare. So he operated for a while among the rich sugar and cotton regions of Louisiana, west of the river. In March, 1863, he concentrated his forces—nearly 25,000 strong—at Baton Rouge. At the same time Commodore Farragut had gathered a small fleet at a point below Port Hudson, with a determination to run by the batteries there and recover the control of the river between that ho drove in the pickets, while two gunboats and some mortar-boats bombarded the works. That night Farragut attempted to pass, but failed, and Banks returned to Baton Rouge. After more operations in Louisiana, Banks returned to the Mississippi and began the investment of Port Hudson, May 24, 1863. His troops were commanded by Gen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), St. Louis, (search)
gs flying. Finally word came to Lyon that cannon and mortars, in boxes marked marble, had been landed from a steamboat and sent to Frost's Confederate camp. Disguised as a woman, closely veiled, Lyon rode around that camp, and was satisfied that it was time for him to act with vigor. Early in the afternoon of May 9, Lyon, by a quick movement, surrounded Frost's camp with 6,000 troops and heavy cannon, and placing guards so as to prevent any communication with the city, demanded of the commander the immediate surrender of men and munitions of war under him, giving him only thirty minutes for deliberation. Intelligence of this movement had reached the city, and an armed body of Confederates rushed out to assist their friends. They were too late. Frost surrendered his 1,200 militia, 1,200 new rifles, twenty cannon, several chests of muskets, and a large quantity of ammunition. Most of these materials of war had been stolen from the arsenal at Baton Rouge. The arsenal was saved.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smith, Edmund Kirby 1824- (search)
in St. Augustine, Fla., May 16, 1824; graduated at West Point in 1845; entered the field under General Taylor, at the beginning of the war with Mexico, and after the war was assistant Professor of Mathematics at West Point (1849-52). He resigned his commission in April, 1861; joined the Confederates, and became a brigadier-general in the > army under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. Promoted to major-general, he was placed in command of the Department of East Tennessee early in 1862. Leading the advance in Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, and behaving gallantly, he was made lieutenant-general (October, 1862), and was in the battle at Stone River. Early in 1863 he was put in command of the Trans-Mississippi Army, which he surrendered to Gen. Edward R. S. Canby (q. v.), May 26, 1865, at Baton Rouge. In 1864 he defeated General Banks in the Red River campaign. He was chancellor of the University of Nashville in 1870-75, and then became Professor of Mathematics in the University of the South.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Taylor, Zachary 1784- (search)
q. v.). From 1836 to 1840 he served in Florida (see Seminole War), and in 1840 was appointed to the command of the 1st Department of the Army of the Southwest, with the rank of brevet brigadiergeneral. At that time he purchased an estate near Baton Rouge, to which he removed his family. After the annexation of Texas (q. v.), when war between the United States and Mexico seemed imminent, he was sent with General Taylor's residence at Baton Rouge. a considerable force into Texas to watch thBaton Rouge. a considerable force into Texas to watch the movements of the Mexicans. In March, 1846, he moved to the banks of the Rio Grande, opposite Matamoras, and in May engaged in two sharp battles with the Mexicans on Texas soil. He was then promoted to major-general. He entered Mexico May 18, 1846, and soon afterwards captured the stronghold of Monterey. He occupied strong positions, but remained quiet for some time, awaiting instructions from his government. Early in 1847 a requisition from General Scott deprived him of a large portion
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