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g for pleasure and recreation, proceeded on his way up the valley of the river and towards the objective point of his journey, the rebel capital. Nothing worthy of note occurred during the day; he stopped at noon at a house by the wayside, and obtained dinner for himself and horse. In a conversation with his host, who was a well-to-do old farmer, he apparently in a careless manner betrayed the fact that he himself followed the same occupation, that he lived on the river in the county of Norfolk, below, and was on his way to visit among friends at Petersburgh. It was towards evening that he neared the outskirts of the city, when he suddenly encountered the rebel pickets, stationed outside the town, who halted him and demanded to know his name and business. My name is Curtis, replied the operative, and I am from Norfolk; my business I will state to your commander when I am taken to him. Without further ceremony he was turned over to the officer of the guard, who sent him unde
arerooms at Nos. 81 to 91 Washington Street, leaving Mr. Geldowsky in charge of the manufacturing business. In 1888 Messrs. Keeler & Co. again took control of the factory, Mr. Geldowsky continuing in their employ until his death in July, 1890. During the past ten years they have made a feature of fine cabinet work, and have completed order work from special designs for many public buildings, among which are the City Hall, Fall River; State House Extension, Boston; City Hall, Cambridge; Norfolk County Court House, Dedham; and Middlesex County buildings, East Cambridge; a number of banks, offices, libraries, and armories. The present firm of Keeler & Co. is composed of Alvin F. Sortwell, of this city, special partner, and Ruel P. Buzzell, general partner. W. C. H. Badger & Co. W. C. H. Badger & Co., furniture manufacturers, are located in a large brick building on Albany Street, near Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridgeport. The members of the firm are W. C. H. Badger and George
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
h great zeal in behalf of the Abolitionist. It was high time for St. Clair to change sides. He had been endeavoring to win over the colored people of Fall River by false representations as to the declining circulation of the Liberator, and as to Mr. Garrison's own desire for a new paper—based, of course, on the latter's proposal of a monthly organ to head off the Abolitionist (Lib. 9.22, and ante, p. 262). Wise's coat-turning was ludicrously sudden, after having resolved, through the Norfolk County A. S. Society, that the Liberator had not departed from its old principles (Lib. 9: 34). He was now recommending the Abolitionist because, as he said, in his dainty way, he preferred having the hairs served up in one plate, the butter in another. These worthies were assisted by the Rev. J. T. Woodbury, who charged Mr. Garrison, among other dreadful things, with being a Thomsonian—--a very good reason, thought the latter, why a new anti-slavery paper should be started in this commonwealt
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
; and some of the manuscripts are invaluable. They relate to all branches of learning; and here I have found the handwriting of Sir Edward Coke, and have for hours pored over the crabbed page which bears the marks of his pen. In the library there are many works with his annotations. Lord Leicester Thomas William Coke, Earl of Leicester, 1752-1842. He inherited the estates of his uncle, Thomas Coke, who was Earl of Leicester and a descendant of Sir Edward Coke. He represented the County of Norfolk in Parliament from 1776 to 1832, and was known as the first Commoner of England. He was faithful to the Whig party. In 1837 he was created a peer, with the title of Earl of Leicester of Holkham. He was distinguished for his zeal in promoting an improved cultivation of the soil, and was reputed to be the first farmer of England. Miss Martineau records the remarkable changes which he wrought on his estates,—History of England, Book VI: ch. XVI. His estate and mode of living are desc
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
tiff's counsel, and Henry B. Stanton and Horace E. Smith were for the defence. According to Mr. Stanton, Sumner shone in the hard fight. Tills is his only known case before a jury at this period. His last appearance in court was when he argued in the Supreme Court of the State in behalf of a trustee's answer in a trustee process. Rice v. Brown, 9 Cushing Reports, vol. IX. p. 308. He appeared for his friend, F. W. Bird, before a legislative committee in relation to the route of the Norfolk County Railroad. He had a fair share of office business; and among clients to whom he rendered such service were C. F. Adams and A. McPhail. His briefs in the patent cases, still preserved, show careful preparation both as to the law and the facts, and a capacity to deal with this difficult and subtle branch of the law beyond what could be expected of one who was so strongly drawn to comprehensive discussions relating to human society. His briefs in the insurance cases show the same complete
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
Winthrop can do you no harm, and it needs no attention. Winthrop's sharp reflections at this time were prompted by Sumner's including in a recent edition of his Orations and Addresses his letter to Winthrop, Oct. 25, 1846.(Ante, p. 134.) It should be said, however, that Sumner included the letter as a historical paper, with no purpose to revive a controversy. The Free Soilers were particularly annoyed by the reproaches of the non-voting Abolitionists. Mr. Garrison, at a meeting of the Norfolk County Antislavery Society, held at Dedham, April 22, introduced a resolution condemning the senator's silence for four months on the slavery question, and his omission for two months to present the petition for the relief of Drayton and Sayres. Mr. Garrison renewed his criticisms on both points at different times in the Liberator, April 23; June 4, 11, 18; August 6,13. Another non-voting Abolitionist, Edmund Quincy, also repeated them in letters to the Antislavery Standard, which were copi
April 20, and was in line on the afternoon of that day; and was joined later (May 1) by Capt. Albert Dodd's company from Boston. This completed the list of the three months volunteers, whose statistics were as follows:— Statistics of the Three Months Volunteers. Commissioned Officers.Enlisted Men.Total. Barnstable County,-66 Berkshire County37376 Bristol County21192213 Essex County71857928 Franklin County-11 Hampden County-33 Hampshire County-22 Middlesex County57882939 Norfolk County21391412 Plymouth County19333352 Suffolk County27325352 Worcester County24339363 Other States,15657 Residence not given,-3232 Totals,2443,4923,736 When we stop to consider what an utterly peaceful community had been, until within a week or two, that which these regiments represented, it is impossible not to admire the promptness with which they took up arms. In the later fatigues of the war we looked back almost with wonder on the enthusiasm which had welcomed these early regim
Joas; and antiquarians have doubted which was the true name. Proof has at last been presented by J. Hammond Trumbull, Ll. D., that his widow and Mr. Dunster wrote the name Josse; but that he himself wrote it Jose, three times in his last will he adds, comparison of the forms Josse, andJoas.,with the autograph Jose, shows that the name was pronounced as a monosyllable, and that the first vowel was moderately long,. See New England Hist. and Gen. Register, XXX. 27. Goddard, Edward. of Norfolk Co., England, a farmer, m.——Doyley, and had William, John, Richard, Edward, James, Vincent, Benjamin , Thomas, Josias, and three daughters, who reached maturity. Goddard Gen., p. 5. 2. William, s. of Edward (1), was a grocer in London, m. Elizabeth Miles, and had William, Joseph, Robert, and three others who d. young. He came to New England in 1665; his w. and chil, followed him in 1666;. He had in Watertown, besides three who. young, Benjamin. b. 17 Aug. 1668; Josiah, b. about 1672. r
Joas; and antiquarians have doubted which was the true name. Proof has at last been presented by J. Hammond Trumbull, Ll. D., that his widow and Mr. Dunster wrote the name Josse; but that he himself wrote it Jose, three times in his last will he adds, comparison of the forms Josse, andJoas.,with the autograph Jose, shows that the name was pronounced as a monosyllable, and that the first vowel was moderately long,. See New England Hist. and Gen. Register, XXX. 27. Goddard, Edward. of Norfolk Co., England, a farmer, m.——Doyley, and had William, John, Richard, Edward, James, Vincent, Benjamin , Thomas, Josias, and three daughters, who reached maturity. Goddard Gen., p. 5. 2. William, s. of Edward (1), was a grocer in London, m. Elizabeth Miles, and had William, Joseph, Robert, and three others who d. young. He came to New England in 1665; his w. and chil, followed him in 1666;. He had in Watertown, besides three who. young, Benjamin. b. 17 Aug. 1668; Josiah, b. about 1672. r
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1853. (search)
1853. Wilder Dwight. Major 2d Mass. Vols. (Infantry), May 24, 1861; Lieutenant-Colonel, June 13, 1862; died September 19, 1862, of wounds received at Antietam, September 17. Wilder Dwight, second son of William and Elizabeth Amelia (White) Dwight, was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, on the 23d of April, 1833. His paternal ancestor was John Dwight of Oxfordshire, England, who settled in Dedham, Massachusetts, in 1636. His mother was descended from William White of Norfolk County, England, who settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1635. His family has belonged to New England for more than two centuries, and during that whole period has been identified with its history, its industry, its enterprises, and its institutions. In childhood he gave promise of all that he afterwards became,—manly, courageous, self-possessed, acute, original, frank, affectionate, generous, reliable;—he was, in boyhood, not less than in manhood, one in whom to place an absolute trust. Yet,
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