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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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ills, but found that in order to reach the hard land he would have to cross a long corduroy causeway with a battery enfilading it, others cross-firing it, with a similar line of rifle-pits and trenches before described. The Confederate forces in Vicksburg at this time were still under the command of Maj.-Gen. Martin L. Smith, who was reinforced from Bragg's army by the Georgia brigade of Seth M. Barton, the Tennessee brigades of John C. Vaughn and John Gregg, and the Alabama brigade of E. D. Tracy. Brig.-Gen. Stephen D. Lee, a distinguished soldier who had been conspicuous in the operations of the army of Northern Virginia as a colonel of artillery, was put in command of a provisional division which included a number of regiments and battalions and artillery, among which were the Third Mississippi, Third battalion State troops, Fourth regiment, Col. Pierre S. Layton; Thirteenth and Thirty-fifth regiments; Forty-sixth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. K. Easterling; the Mississippi batterie
s: Fortieth, Forty-first, Forty-second, Forty-third and Fifty-second. Second brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. D. Tracy, Col. I. W. Garrott, Brig.-Gen. Stephen D. Leeā€”Five Alabama regiments: Twentieth, Twenty. Bowen at Grand Gulf, with the brigades of Cockrell and M. E. Green, was being reinforced by Tracy's and Baldwin's brigades; but these commands were all small in numbers, and his aggregate of eff Robert Lowry, to occupy the roads from Bruinsburg to Port Gibson, and soon reinforced them with Tracy's brigade. He was threatened on all sides, above and below. During the night of April 30th Mle army in this battle were 60 killed and 340 wounded. Among the killed, unfortunately, was Gen. E. D. Tracy. The Federal loss was much more severe-131 killed, 719 wounded and 25 missing; but they were compensated to some extent by capturing 387 men, mainly from Green and Tracy. Bowen held his position on Bayou Pierre during the next day, but was not reinforced. Generals Loring and Tilghman ar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
taff. Colonel Robert T. Jones, of Perry, kiled at Seven Pines. Colonel B. B. Gayle, of Morgan, promoted from Captain; killed Boonsboro. Colonel Samuel B. Pickens, of South Carolina, promoted from Adjutant; wounded at Spotsylvania and Winchester. Lieutenant Colonel Theodora O'Hara, of Kentucky, the author of the world renowned lyric, The Bivouac of the Dead, and that almost as famous, The Pioneer. Buried in Frankfort, Ky. Lieutenant Colonel J. C. Goodgame of Coosa Co. Major E. D. Tracy, of Madison; transferred. Promoted Brigadier General. Killed at Grand Gulf, Miss. Brother of Major Philip Tracy of the 6th Georgia, who was killed at Gettysburg. Was a college classmate of Major John W. Park of Greenville, Georgia, brother of Capt. R. E. Park. Major John C. Brown of Coffee, resigned. Major Adolph Proskauer, promoted from Captain, Company C, wounded at Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. Adjutant S. B. Pickens of South Carolina. Adjutant L. Gayle of Virginia
ection against, VI, 319. Torrence, E., X., 296. Totopotomoy, Va., III., 78. Totopotomoy Creek, Va., III., 322. Totten's battery, Union, I., 350. Toucey, I., VI., 50. Tournament, the, Sidney Lanier, IX., 25, 30, 284, 285. Tours, the battle of, I., 30. Town Creek, N. C., III., 342. Townsend, J. H., I., 241; VI, 83. Townsend, Mary Ix., 276. Toy, C. H., VIII., 110, 115. Trabui, G. W., V., 65. Tracy, B. F., VII, 65. Tracy, E. D., X., 151. Tracy, W. G., II., 334. Tramp Tramp Tramp, IX., 235. Trans-Mississippi Army, X., 274. Transport wagon train Iii., 31. Transportation of wounded: means employed for, VII, 302; of Federal sick and wounded: VII., 302-316; over long distances, means not provided for, VII., 304; important letter showing inadequacy of, VII, 304, 306; of wounded after August 2, 1862, great improvement in, VII., 306, 308; act of Congress, 1864, in regard to ambulance servi
--The Macon Telegraph, of the 2d inst., publishes a dispatch, dated Port Gibson, Miss, 1st inst., announcing that Brig.-Gen. E. D. Tracy has fallen in battle. The Telegraph says: Gen. Tracy was a native of Macon, and brother of the gallant MajGen. Tracy was a native of Macon, and brother of the gallant Major Pull. Tracy, who poured out his life blood in the fight of Sharpsburg Gen. Tracy was only about twenty eight years of age. The out breaking of the war found his comfortably located in Huntsville, Ala., with a large and incentive legal practice, Tracy, who poured out his life blood in the fight of Sharpsburg Gen. Tracy was only about twenty eight years of age. The out breaking of the war found his comfortably located in Huntsville, Ala., with a large and incentive legal practice, an accomplished wife and a young family. Few men of his years had fairer wordily prospects. He at once entered the service, we think, as captain, and by his intelligence, energy, and courage, re rapidly to the distinguished military position he heGen. Tracy was only about twenty eight years of age. The out breaking of the war found his comfortably located in Huntsville, Ala., with a large and incentive legal practice, an accomplished wife and a young family. Few men of his years had fairer wordily prospects. He at once entered the service, we think, as captain, and by his intelligence, energy, and courage, re rapidly to the distinguished military position he held when he fell. He was a man of most exemplary character of decided piety and universally respected and loved wherever known.
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