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en the selectmen named. The first was from the town pump, west to Charlestown line, High street; second, east to Malden line, Salem; and third, south to foot of Winter hill, Main. Three streets branched to the right from High street to Woburn line. Purchase (now Winthrop), Woburn and Grove. Today only the three Hall houses below Governors avenue, the Unitarian parsonage, and the old Magoun cottage opposite remain of those standing in 1829. The present Winthrop square was then called Turell's corner. A new road had then been recently proposed which would have crossed the Playstead and Brooks estate, and also the Aberjona river, to the West Cambridge road, but instead, another was partially bought, hence its name. It made a more direct and level route to Upper Medford, and left old Woburn street to become a residential section. Let us now look at old High street, beginning at its terminal, Charlestown line. An old resident of Medford did this for us, and his story may be f
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 29., Development of the business section of West Medford. (search)
ly. Five buildings still remain to be mangled, moved or demolished to complete the widening act on High street, but Mystic Hall, built for a community center in 1852, still remains, as does also its proprietor, Mr. Ober, ninety-two, the dean of the business men of Medford. The post office has been moved into its new quarters beside Whitmore brook. When High street was named it crossed Meeting-house and Whitmore brooks not only by bridges but by fording places. For some years the latter has had a summer vacation, but at times returns, but not to its former volume. When the street widening is complete we suggest that with the new order the locality be named Whitmore square, in remembrance of its early settler, the good Deacon John Whitmore, whose house, built in 1680, stood here till the twentieth century came. That he was a worthy citizen of the old time is seen in the text of his funeral sermon by Parson Turell. Mnason of Cyprus, an old disciple with whom we should lodge.
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