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Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 14: the minister's wooing, 1857-1859. (search)
's humor, pathos, clear moral sense, and quick eye for the scenery of life. We do not believe that there is any one who, by birth, breeding, and natural capacity, has had the opportunity to know New England so well as she, or who has the peculiar genius so to profit by the knowledge. Already there have been scenes in The Minister's Wooing that, In their lowness of tone and quiet truth, contrast as charmingly with the humid vagueness of the modern school of novel-writers as The Vicar of Wakefield itself, and we are greatly mistaken if it do not prove to be the most characteristic of Mrs. Stowe's works, and therefore that on which her fame will chiefly rest with posterity. The minister's Wooing was not completed as a serial till December, 1859. Long before its completion Mrs. Stowe received letters from many interested readers, who were as much concerned for the future of her spiritual children, as George Eliot would call them, as if they had been flesh and blood. The follow
ow, with the softest fur, a perfect bunch of loving-kindness, all purr and felicity. I had a good audience last evening, and enjoyed it. My audiences, considering the horse disease and the rains, are amazing. And how they do laugh! We get into regular gales. E. has the real country minister turn-out: horse and buggy, and such a nice horse too. The baby is a beauty, and giggles, and goos, and shouts inquiries with the rising inflection, in the most inspiring manner. November 13. Wakefield. I read in Haverhill last night. It was as usual stormy. I had a good audience, but not springy and inspiriting like that at Waltham. Some audiences seem to put spring into one, and some to take it out. This one seemed good but heavy. I had to lift them, while in Framingham and Waltham they lifted me. The Lord bless and keep you. It grieves me to think you are dull and I not with you. By and by we will be together and stay together. Good-by dear. Your ever loving wife, H. B.
November 13. Wakefield. I read in Haverhill last night. It was as usual stormy. I had a good audience, but not springy and inspiriting like that at Waltham. Some audiences seem to put spring into one, and some to take it out. This one seemed good but heavy. I had to lift them, while in Framingham and Waltham they lifted me. The Lord bless and keep you. It grieves me to think you are dull and I not with you. By and by we will be together and stay together. Good-by dear. Your ever loving wife, H. B. S.
ared with, 409; H. W. Beecher's approval of, 476; new edition with introduction sent to George Eliot, 4S3; date of, 490; Whittier's mention of, in poem on seventieth birthday, 502; Holmes' tribute to, in poem on same occasion, 504. U. Upham, Mrs., kindness to H. B. S., 133; visit to, 324. V. Venice, 304. Victoria, Queen, H. B. S.'s interview with, 270; gives her picture to Geo. Peabody, 496. Vizetelly, Henry, first London publisher of Uncle Tom's Cabin, 189, 191. W. Wakefield, reading at, 495. Walnut Hills, picture of, 65; and old home revisited, 499. Waltham, audience inspires reader, 496. Washington, Mrs. Stowe visits soldier son at, 366. Washington on slavery, 141. Water cure, H. B. S. at, 113. We and our neighbors, date of, 491. Webster, Daniel, famous speech of, 143. Weld, Theodore D. in the anti-slavery movement, 81. Western travel, discomforts of, 498. Whately, Archbishop, letter to H. B. S. from, 391. Whitney, A. D. T.,
m pumps of a few hundred pounds weight to the highest grade of water-works pumping engines weighing over one million pounds each. Among the prominent American cities using the Blake water-works engines may be mentioned: Boston, New York, Washington, Camden, New Orleans, Cleveland, Mobile, Toronto, Shreveport, Helena, Birmingham, Racine, La Crosse, Mc-Keesport, etc. A partial list of places in Massachusetts includes: Cambridge, Newton, Brookline, Woburn, Natick, Hyde Park, Dedham, Needham, Wakefield, Malden, Arlington, Belmont, Walpole, Lexington, Gloucester, Marlboro, Weymouth, North Adams, Maynard, Mansfield, Randolph, Foxboro, Cohasset, Lenox, Chelsea, Brockton, Franklin, Provincetown, Canton, Stoughton, Braintree, and Wellesley. These engines are also in use in foreign water-works, as for instance at St. Petersburg, Honolulu, and Sydney. The new United States Navy is practically fitted out with Blake pumps, a partial list including the following vessels: Columbia, New York, I
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
Littlepage manuscripts. Cooper's rank as a romancer The clear victory which the first great British novelists won over popular taste did not, for some years, make them masters of the colonial public. Pamela, indeed, was printed as early as 1744 in Philadelphia, by Benjamin Franklin, and in the same year in New York and in Boston. But the only other novels printed in America before the Declaration of Independence seem to have been Robinson Crusoe (1768), Rasselas (1768), The Vicar of Wakefield (1772), Juliet Grenville (1 774), and The works of Laurence Sterne M. A. (1774). Publishers, however, were less active than importers, for diaries and library catalogues show that British editions were on many shelves. The Southern and Middle colonies may have read more novels than did New England, yet Jonathan Edwards himself, whose savage quarrel with the Northampton congregation had arisen partly over the licentious books [possibly Pamela, among others] which some of the younger membe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
ctionary, 115 Universal Instructor in all Arts and sciences, etc., 15 Unknown way, the, 271 Unseen Spirits, 280 Untaught Bard, 163 Upside down, 305 V Valla, Laurentius, 68 Van Buren, Martin, 239, 250 Van Doren, C., 262 n., 289 n. Vane, Sir, Harry, 4, 45 Vanity of Vanities, 157 Vasconselos, 317 Vaughn, William, 3-4 Velasco, 224 Vergennes, 91 Vermont wool Dealer, the, 228 Verplanck, G. C., 240 Very, Jones, 333 Veteran, the, 230 Vicar of Wakefield, the, 284 View of the causes and consequences of the American Revolution, a, 139 View of the controversy between great Britain and her colonies, a, 136 View of the political system of the United States, 146 Villeneuve, 246 Vindication of the British colonies against the Aspersions of the Halifax Gentleman, a, 128 Vindication of the conduct of the House of Representatives of the province of the Massachusetts Bay, a, 126 Vindication of the New England churches, 52 Vir
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
f the old time, his works will prove the best thesaurus. In addition to his interest in the life about him Harris soon came to have an equal interest in Turner's large library. Among his favourite books were the writings of Sir Thomas Browne, the essays of Addison and Steele, and later the Bible and Shakespeare. His best loved writer, however, from first to last, and the one whose genius was most like his own, was Goldsmith. The only way to describe my experience with The Vicar of Wakefield, he said in his later years, is to acknowledge that I am a crank. It touches me more deeply, it gives me the all-overs more severely than all others. Its simplicity, its air of extreme wonderment, have touched and continue to touch me deeply. Among the writers of New England Harris seems to have cared least for Emerson and most for Lowell. Culture, he once wrote, is a very fine thing, indeed, but it is never of much account either in life or in literature, unless it is used as a c
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
408 Upon the Hill before Centreville, 278, 280 Van Buren, Martin, 116, 151, 183 Vance, Zebulon Baird, 318, 320 Vanderbilt University, 351 n. Varuna, the, 282 Verplanck, G. C., 150, 164, 174, 400 Very, Jones, 166 Vicar of Wakefield, the, 349 Vicarious sacrifice, the, 213 Victor of Antietam, the, 279, 281 View of the Primary causes and movements of the thirty years War, a, 146 Views of Calvinism, 210 Vignaud, H., 128 Village, the, 50 Village Blacksmith, thelas, 241, 408 Voices of freedom, 46 Voltaire, 126, 128, 230 Voices of the night, 34 Vondel, 225 Voyage of the good ship Union, 303 Wadsworth family, the, 32 Waif, the, 35 Wait for the wagon, 298 Waiting for news, 286 Wakefield, 24 Walden, or life in the woods, 12, 14 Wallace, A. R., 222 Wanted—A Man, 276, 280 War, 45 Ward, General, 225 Ward, Elizabeth S. P., 280, 388, 398, 401 Ward, Nathaniel, 149 Ware, Rev., Henry, 208, 397 Ware family, the, 197
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, Fayal and the Portuguese. (search)
terference. Books proved to be scarce on the island. One official gentleman from Lisbon, quite an accomplished man, who spoke French fluently and English tolerably, had some five hundred books, chiefly in the former tongue, including seventy-two volumes of Balzac. His daughter, a young lady of fifteen, more accomplished than most of the belles of the island, showed me her little library of books in French and Portuguese, including three English volumes, an odd selection,--The Vicar of Wakefield, Gregory's Legacy to his daughters, and Fielding's Life of Jonathan wild. But, indeed, her supply of modern Portuguese literature was almost as scanty (there is so very little of it), and we heard of a gentleman's studying French in order to have something to read, which seemed the last stage in national decay. Perhaps we were still more startled by the unexpected literary criticisms of a young lady from St. Michael, English on the father's side, but still Roman Catholic, who had just
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