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ille, D. D., D. 103 Dickson, David L., P. 73 Dictator, one wanted in Va., D. 61 Dickinson, —, inventor of Winans' steam-gun, D. 66 Dickinson, Daniel S., D. 67; speech at N. Y., April 20, Doc. 85 Dickinson, H., commissionerg, N. Y., April 20, Doc. 117 State sovereignty does not authorize secession, Int. 15 Steam-gun, description of Winans', P. 98 Steele, John B. D. 32 Stephens, A. H., speech at Milledgeville, Ga., Nov. 14, Doc. 219; quotation fro V., D. 102; Doc. 366; speech at the departure of his regiment, Doc. 367 Wilson's Zouaves leave N. Y., D. 102 Winans' steam-gun, described, P. 98 Winans, Ross, his steam-gun captured, D. 66; arrested, D. 59, 70 Winans, Thomas,Winans, Ross, his steam-gun captured, D. 66; arrested, D. 59, 70 Winans, Thomas, notice of, P. 59 Winser, Lieut, D. 79 Winslow, Lanier & Co., of New York, D. 47 Winthrot, Theodore, Major, anecdote of, D. 105; at Bethel, Doc. 361 Winthrot, B. R., D. 46 Winthrop, R. C., anecdote of, P. 21 Wiscassett
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Winans, Ross 1796-1877 (search)
Winans, Ross 1796-1877 Inventor; born in Vernon, N. J. October, 1796; showed an inventive bent early in life; and was sent to England as an agent of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to examine English railroad systems. Returning to the United States he constructed the first locomotive used with success on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. He also designed the eightwheeled car and the camel-back locomotive; founded in Baltimore the most extensive railway machine works in the United States. He was chosen to the extra session of the legislature of Maryland in 1861, but was made a prisoner in Fort McHenry. He died in Baltimore, Md., April 11, 1877.
gar, were directed to be especially spry, and they kept their optics wide open for the mysterious stranger. Yesterday afternoon they stumbled upon a queer contrivance which lay at the lower end of Smith's Island, and proved to be the submarine monster of which they were in search. Externally it had the appearance of a section of boiler about twenty feet long, with tapered ends, presenting the shape and appearance of an enormous cigar with a boiler iron wrapper, and for all the world like Winans' celebrated steamer in respect to shape. The after end was furnished with a propeller, which had a contrivance for protecting it from damage from coming in contact with external objects. The forward end was sharkish in appearance, and the shark idea was carried out in other respects, as only the ridge of the back was above water, while the tail and snout were submerged. Near the forward end was the hatchway or man-hole, through which egress and ingress were obtained. This hole was covere
Some think there will be no war; as to that I know not. But whatever others wanted, the object of the Confederate Government is peace. Come peace or war, however, it is determined to maintain our position at every hazard and at every cost, and to drive back the myrmidons of Abolitionism. It is to be hoped that Lincoln will perceive his error and cease his warlike preparations. The war is against all the principles on which the Government of the United States is based. The arrest of Ross Winans, by the order of President Lincoln, is an act of despotism which the autocrat of Russia, with all his absolute power, never thought of exceeding. It is an assumption of power on the part of the Executive which even Congress had never dared to usurp; for the Constitution of the United States expressly provides that no citizen thereof shall be deprived of his life, liberty, or property, except as a punishment for crimes, and after a fair trial by his peers. The proclamation declaring ou
Nov. 5.—The Governor writes to A. H. Bullock, at Worcester, forwarding to him a check from A. D. and J. G. Smith & Co., Providence, R. I., for one hundred dollars, payable to his order; fifty dollars to be expended for the soldiers of the Fifteenth, and fifty dollars for the soldiers of the Twentieth Regiment,—the two which had been engaged in the battle of Ball's Bluff. Nov. 6.—The Governor writes to Surgeon Galloupe, of the Seventeenth Regiment, acknowledging the receipt of one of Ross Winans's pikes, made by him at Baltimore for the rebels, and says, It will find a place among the other souvenirs of the war in Massachusetts. At present, it finds a place over the portrait in the Council Chamber of Rev. Mr. Higginson, one of the earliest clergymen of Salem, whose ghost must be astonished at the strange incongruity. On the same day, he writes to Colonel Palfrey, of the Twentieth, Please write to me at once the facts concerning the young man now under arrest for sleeping on his<
ge office, large numbers of men were standing in groups, evidently absorbed in some particular topic of conversation. While wondering what all this meant, the detective was accosted by a man named Sam Sloan, one of the most faithful of his adherents. Webster, I was just going up to see you. Have you heard the news? I have heard nothing, Sam, was the reply. Is there a new sensation this morning? Another of Lincoln's outrages, said Sloan, with an indignant oath. Major Brown, Ross Winans, and several others were arrested last night, and taken to Fort McHenry. What for? For no other purpose, I suppose, than to break up the election, which is to take place next month. But how can that interfere with the election? By making us all afraid to go to the polls, or speak our minds. The two walked down the street together, and dropped into a drug store, which was known as one of the resorts of the unterrified. There they found a number of men conversing somewhat
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
utler by telegram for his hazardous occupation of Baltimore, which was made without his knowledge and approbation, commanded him to issue no more proclamations, to which Butler replied that he acted on verbal directions received from the war department. An order from General Scott quickly followed removing General Butler to Fortress Monroe, on account of which the removed officer complained to Mr. Cameron that he was quite content to be relieved altogether, but will not be disgraced. Mr. Ross Winans, of Baltimore, had been arrested by General Butler on the 15th of May and sent to Fort McHenry, but he was promptly released by General Cadwallader, who succeeded Butler in command. The Union defense committee, of New York, through its chairman, Mr. J. J. Astor, Jr., proposed to send a number of rifled cannon to Fort Pickens, but Secretary Cameron would give no such authority as is therein asked for, and informed the committee that the war department would act through the agency of its
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
tes. The legislature had been elected in 1859 and was charged with no mandate for revolutionary times. Ten members from Baltimore were elected at a special election held in that city on the 24th, in the place of the delegation returned as elected in 1859, but unseated on account of fraud and violence at the election. The new members were the leading men of the town—merchants, lawyers, representatives of the great business of commerce and trade of a great city. They were John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. Mason Morfit, S. Teakle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Langston. It was evident in twenty-four hours that conservatism would rule the councils of the general assembly, as it had done those of the governor, and that all the influence of that body would be exerted against any action by the State looking toward taking part in the revolution, which it was clear, was upon the whole country. Captain John
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: Maryland's overthrow. (search)
ted the entire record to be certified to the President of the United States for his information and action. On the 14th of May the legislature adjourned, and Ross Winans, a member of the house of delegates from Baltimore City—the head of the firm of Ross Winans & Co., the greatest manufacturers of locomotive engines and railroadRoss Winans & Co., the greatest manufacturers of locomotive engines and railroad cars in the world—was arrested by General Butler at the Relay House on his way home. Ross Winans was not only a man of great wealth, one of the millionaires of the day, but he was a man whose moral character, whose genius, whose breadth of mind and greatness of heart, whose culture and whose courage would have made him distinguisRoss Winans was not only a man of great wealth, one of the millionaires of the day, but he was a man whose moral character, whose genius, whose breadth of mind and greatness of heart, whose culture and whose courage would have made him distinguished in any country in the world. His arrest was intended to terrorize the State. It had the effect of rousing it like the long roll. The legislature, at its adjourned session of June 22d, declared that The unconstitutional and arbitrary proceedings of the Federal executive have not been confined to the violation of the per
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
s the scolding of the Maryland legislature became annoying to the authorities, they determined to suppress the one and thus silence the other. On September 12, 1861, Major-General Dix, commanding in Baltimore, ordered the arrest of the members of the legislature from Baltimore City and the mayor and other obnoxious persons who annoyed him with talk, to-wit: George William Brown, Coleman Yellott, Senator Stephen P. Dennis, Charles H. Pitts, Andrew A. Lynch, Lawrence Langston, H M. Morfit, Ross Winans, J. Hanson Thomas, W. G. Harrison, John C. Brune, Robert M. Denison, Leonard D. Quinlan, Thomas W. Renshaw, Henry May, member of Congress from the Fourth congressional district, Frank Key Howard, editor of the Baltimore Exchange, and Thomas W. Hall, editor of the South. The arrests were made with great secrecy, and it was intended to send them to the Dry Tortugas, but there being no steamer fit for the voyage in Hampton Roads, they were dispatched to Fort Warren in Boston harbor. Liber
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