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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 4 4 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, III. June, 1861 (search)
t hostilities have commenced. We have accounts of frightful massacres in Missouri, by German mercenaries. Hampton has been occupied by the enemy, a detachment having been sent from Fortress Monroe for that purpose. They also hold Newport News on the Peninsula! There are rumors of a fight at Philippi. One Col. Potterfield was surprised. If this be so, there is no excuse for him. I think the President will make short work of incompetent commanders. Now a blunder is worse than a crime. June 4 The Secretary is still sick. Having nothing better to do, and seeing that eight-tenths of the letters received are merely applications for commissions in the regular army — an organization without men-and none being granted from civil life, I employed myself writing certain articles for the press, hoping by this means to relieve the Secretary of the useless and painful labor of dictating negative replies to numberless communications. This had the sanction of both the President and the S
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 16 (search)
ere was a battery before them-and they would take it from a legion of devils! The moral effect of this victory must be great. The enemy have been taught that none of the engines of destruction that can be wielded against us, will prevent us from taking their batteries; and so, hereafter, when we charge upon them, they might as well run away from their own guns. June 3 Gen. Lee henceforth assumes command of the army in person. This may be hailed as the harbinger of bright fortune. June 4 Col. Bledsoe sent word to me to-day by my son that he wished to see me. When I met him he groaned as usual, and said the department would have to open another passport office, as the major-generals in the field refused to permit the relatives of the sick and wounded in the camps to pass with orders from Brig.-Gen. Winder or his Provost Marshal. June 5 I reopened my office in the department. June 6 Gen. Winder getting wind of what was going on, had an interview, first with Mr.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
t North Carolina has been wronged by calumnious imputations, and many in the army and elsewhere made to believe she was not putting forth all her energies in the work of independence. He declares that North Carolina furnished more than half the killed and wounded in the two great battles on the Rappahannock, in December and May last. By the Northern papers we see the President of the United States, his wife, and his cabinet are amusing themselves at the White House with Spiritualism. June 4 To-day we have characteristic unintelligible dispatches from Mississippi. They say, up to third instant, yesterday, everything is encouraging; but the Memphis papers say Grant's losses have not been so large as was supposed. Then it is reported that Grant has retired to Grand Gulf. Yet it is expected the town will be stormed in twenty-four hours! When Grant leaves Vicksburg, our generals will pursue, and assume the aggressive in more directions than one. Lee has some occult object
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 40 (search)
ress Company has bribed the quartermasters, and is at its work again, using fine horses and stout details that should be in the army. Its wagon was at the department to-day with a box of bacon for Judge Campbell. About 800 prisoners were marched into the city this afternoon, and it is believed many more are on the way. Cannonading was heard again in a northeast direction this evening from 6 till 81 o'clock, when it ceased-perhaps the prelude to another scene of carnage to-morrow! June 4 Showers and sunshine. It is believed Grant has lost 40,000 within the last week! To-day there has been more or less cannonading along the line; but it is not known if any infantry were engaged. The battalion to which Custis (my son) belongs is at Bottom's Bridge, some sixteen miles distant on the Chickahominy; and I learn that the enemy shelled it yesterday and last night, without injury, shells falling short. It is suspected that Sherman will be ordered from Georgia to rein
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
n his army a few days' rest at this point, again put it in motion on the 23d for Dallas, with a view of turning the difficult pass at Allatoona. On the afternoon of the 25th the advance, under General Hooker, had a severe battle with the enemy, driving him back to New Hope Church, near Dallas. Several sharp encounters occurred at this point. The most important was on the 28th, when the enemy assaulted General Mc- Pherson at Dallas, but received a terrible and bloody repulse. On the 4th of June Johnston abandoned his intrenched position at New Hope Church and retreated to the strong positions of Kenesaw, Pine, and Lost Mountains. He was forced to yield the two last-named places and concentrate his army on Kenesaw, where, on the 27th, Generals Thomas and McPherson made a determined but unsuccessful assault. On the night of the 2d of July Sherman commenced moving his army by the right flank, and on the morning of the 3d found that the enemy, in consequence of this movement, had
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
ns August 24-September 8. No. 127Capt. George C. Lusk, Tenth Illinois Infantry, of operations May 1-August 20. No. 128Lieut. Col. James B. Cahill, Sixteenth Illinois Infantry. No. 129Col. William B. Anderson, Sixtieth Illinois Infantry. No. 130Col. Charles M. Lurm, Tenth Michigan Infantry, of operations May 16-August 27. No. 131Capt. William H. Dunphy, Tenth Michigan Infantry, of operations August 27-September 8. No. 132Col. Henry R. Mizner, Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, of operations June 4-September 5. No. 133Maj. Joel O. Martin, Seventeenth New York Infantry, of operations September 1. No. 134Col. John G. Mitchell, One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade. No. 135Lieut. Col. Oscar Van Tassell, Thirty-fourth Illinois Infantry. No. 136Lieut. Col. Maris R. Vernon, Seventy-eighth Illinois Infantry. No. 137Lieut. Col. John S. Pearce, Ninety-eighth Ohio Infantry. No. 138Capt. Toland Jones, One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Infantry. No. 139Col. Henry
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ed the roads leading back to Aliatoona and Acworth, after which I pushed General Stoneman's cavalry rapidly into Allatoona, at the east end of the pass, and General Garrard's cavalry around by the rear to the west end of the pass. Both of these commands reached the points designated without trouble, and we thereby accomplished our real purpose of turning the Allatoona Pass. Ordering the railroad bridge across the Etowah to be at once rebuilt, I continued working by the left, and off the 4th of June had resolved to leave Jobnston in his intrenched position at Newv Hope Church, and move to the railroad about Acworth, when he abandoned his intrenchments, after which we moved readily to Acworth, and reached the railroad on the 6th of June. I at once examined in person the Allatoona Pass, and found it admirably adapted to our use as a secondary base, and gave the necessary orders for its defense and garrison, and as soon as the railroad bridge was finished across the Etowah, our stores
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
ommenced, General McPherson and General Davis having withdrawn from the extreme right position. On the 2d the movement was continued; the Twentieth and Twenty-third Corps and part of the Fourteenth passed beyond our extreme left. June 3 and 4, nothing of consequence, excepting that I thinned and extended my lines so as to cover the ground occupied by the Twenty-third Corps, and afterward by Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, relieving those troops in order to prolong our lines to the left. The result of these movements was to cause the enemy to abandon his lines on the night of June 4. June 5, the command rested. June 6, marched toward Acworth, crossing Allatoona Creek, and massed the command near Dr. Peters' house, on the Acworth and Sandtown road, about two miles from Acworth, which was already in possession of our troops. June 7, 8, and 9, all that was done by the entire army was establishing the depots at Allatoona, rebuilding the bridge across the Etow
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
ker had found the enemy in force. We crossed the Pumpkin Vine near sunset, and at night closed up to Hooker's left. On the 26th Colonel Grose's brigade went into line on the left of Geary's division. We also put in a battery to play upon the enemy's lines. Early on the 27th moved the division to the left to relieve Wood's division, which moved off to the left to attempt to turn the enemy's right. The position of the division here remained substantially the same until the night of the 4th of June, during which the enemy evacuated his line. Cruft's brigade was started back to Kingston as escort to the wagon train of the corps on the 30th. On the night of the 3d of June we relieved half of Davis' front on the left of this division. Our time was constantly employed, whilst in this position, in pushing out works, by successive advances, close to the enemy; and a constant fire of musketry and artillery was kept up whenever we could annoy the enemy. The 5th we lay in camp near Ne
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
na. Hbavy skirmishing ensued, driving the enemy about one and a half miles. Formed a line of battle and moved forward, the enemy withdrawing; camped near Cassville. May 23, 3 p. m., marched with the division via Burnt Hickory, across Pumpkin Vine Creek, to a position near Dallas. Lay in reserve at Dallas till the morning of May 30, when the brigade was ordered to accompany a supply train to Kingston. The Twenty-first Illinois returned from veteran furlough, joined the brigade at Kingston June 4. Rejoined the division near Acworth June 7. June 9, Thirty-eighth Illinois joined the brigade, having returned from veteran furlough. On the morning of June 10 General Cruft was ordered to Chattanooga on account of severe sickness, and I had the honor to assume command. Moved out on the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road in advance of the division, deployed the Twenty-first Illinois and Thirty-first Indiana as skirmishers; the line soon became engaged with the enemy's skirmishers; drove them
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