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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
reek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 10-Sept. 9, 1864.Wheeler's raid to North Georgia and East Tennessee, with combats at Dalton (August 14-15) and other points. Aug. 15, 1864.Skirmishes at Sandtown and Fairburn. Aug. 18-22, 1864.Kilpatrick's raid from Sandtown to Lovejoy's Station, with combats at Camp Creek (18th), Red Oak (19th), Flint River (19th), Jonesborough (19th), and Lovejoy's Station (20th). Aug. 22, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assumes command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 26-Sept. 4, 1864.Operations at the Chattahoochee railroad bridge and at Pace's and Turner's Ferries, with ski
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
rth Illinois Infantry. No. 39Lieut. Col. George W. Smith, Eighty-eighth Illinois Infantry. No. 40Col. Bernard Laiboldt, Second Missouri Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). No. 41Col. Joseph Conrad, Fifteenth Missouri Infantry. No. 42Maj. Arthur MacArthur, jr., Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Infantry. No. 43Brig. Gej. Joseph Fisher, Seventy-fourth Ohio Infantry, of operations July 5-August 15. No. 119Col. William Sirwell, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). No. 120Maj. Michael H. Locher, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry. No. 121Col. Henry A. Hambright, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry, o171Capt. Otho H. Morgan, Seventh Indiana Battery. No. 172Lieut. William P. Stackhouse, Nineteenth Indiana Battery, of operations May 7-August 31. No. 173Capt. Milton A. Osborne, Twentieth Indiana Battery, of operations August 14-September 2. No. 174Lieut. Joseph McKnight, Fifth Wisconsin Battery. Reports continued in Part II.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
osition south of Utoy Creek. August 10, 11, and 12, no advances were made. August 13, it was decided to move all the army, except one corps (which was to be thrown back to the Chattahoochee railroad bridge), around Atlanta upon the railroads running south from East Point, and the pontoon train of the Army of the Cumberland was moved from the railroad bridge, along the north side of the river, to the Sandtown Ferry preparatory to throwing a bridge across the river at that point. August 14, nothing was done by the engineer department, waiting further instructions. August 15, the line of Proctor's Creek was examined for the purpose of selecting a defensive flank to be used when the Army of the Cumberland was withdrawn. Two pontoon bridges were laid at Sandtown Ferry. August 16, accompanied by Lieutenants Twining and Damrell, I visited our extreme right and rode over the lines of the Army of the Ohio, as well as the position which Lieutenant Twining had already select
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
orks. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, occupied same position. August 1 in the evening relieved one brigade of General Hascall's division on the front line. August 2, occupied same position. August 3, made demonstration with skirmish line; lost 8 men wounded. August 4. same position. August 5, made demonstration with skirmish line. August 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, all quiet. August 12, advanced skirmish line 300 or 400 yards, met very little resistance, and returned to old position. August 13, 14, and 15, occupied same position. August 16, shifted position to the left, the length of the brigade. August 17 and 18, all quiet. August 19, put the brigade in position on the Augusta railroad to the left of picket-line, deployed Ninetieth Ohio, One hundred and first Ohio, and Twenty-first Illinois as skirmishers and advanced onehalf mile, drove the enemy's skirmishers into their rifle-pits, and withdrew. In the afternoon made similar demonstrations. August 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25, occ
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
but they massed their forces and compelled ours to fall back. Our loss slight. August 4, all quiet in our front to-day. August 5, skirmishers advanced and tried to drive in or capture the rebel skirmish line, but failed. No loss in regiment. August 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, all quiet in our front during these days. August 11, demonstration made on the picket-line by firing from rifle-pits; otherwise all quiet during the day. August 12 and 13, all quiet except occasional artillery firing. August 14, very heavy cannonading all night on our lines, the enemy replying but little. August 15 and 16, all quiet in our front. August 17, lines were extended to the left; the right did not move. A foraging party went out from the regiment and 2 of its members were captured. August 18, the enemy opened very briskly with siege guns and continued for nearly an hour. Our regiment went to the outer works and remained until dark. Received orders at midnight to move at early daylight to the front
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
near Howard house, relieving troops in the works there. Regiment went on picket in plain view of Atlanta, one and a quarter miles distant. August 2, relieved from skirmish line at 9 p. m. by the Thirty-sixth Illinois, when we moved back to the works. By order of General Newton, Col. E. Opdycke this day (August 6) assumed command of brigade. All quiet up to August 12. Regiment went on a reconnaissance at noon, advancing about 600 yards beyond the skirmish line, and losing 1 man killed. August 14, enemy shelled the camp this evening, firing rapidly, commencing at 8 p. m. and continuing until 11 p. m. No casualties occurred in the regiment. Nothing important transpired until August 17. At 7.30 p. m. moved three-quarters of a mile to the left, and occupied works, remaining until August 25. Marched at 7 p. m., and all following night, toward right wing of the army. August 26, halted at 4 a. m. At 8 a. m. ready to march. Enemy being reported advancing, brigade built a line of work
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 44 (search)
No. 40. report of Col. Bernard Laiboldt, Second Missouri Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). headquarters Post of Dalton, Ga., August 18, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to lay before you a report of the engagement the forces under my command had on the 14th and 15th days of this month with the raiders under Major-General Wheeler: About 4 p. m. on Sunday, the 14th, a part of Wheeler's force, at the lowest estimate 5,000 strong, surrounded the town of Dalton, and after some picket-firing the following demand for surrender was sent to me under flag of truce: headquarters cavalry Corps, Army of Tennessee, Around Dalton, August 14, 1864. officer Commanding U. S. Forces, Dalton: To prevent the unnecessary effusion of blood, I have the honor to demand the immediate and unconditional surrender of the forces under your command at this garrison. Respectfully, yours, &c., Jos. Wheeler, Major-General, Commanding. To which I answered: officer Comman
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
anta once every 15 minutes from meridian until sundown. August 6, by order of Major-General Thomas, the batteries of the corps opened fire upon Atlanta at 4 p. m August 10, the artillery in front of the Third Division was advanced to more commanding positions and thoroughly intrenched. August 13, in accordance with orders received from Brigadier-General Brannan, chief of artillery, Department of the Cumberland, all the artillery .of the corps fired into Atlanta from 4 p. m until daylight August 14. Signal stations having been established in front of each division the effect of the firing was seen, as nearly every shot was fired. August 25, the artillery of this command was withdrawn from the lines between the Augusta railroad and Peach Tree Creek and placed in position near Proctor's Creek. August 26, all the artillery of the corps marched at 6 a. m. to Utoy Creek, except Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, reported to General Wood, and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artiller
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 97 (search)
me subjected to a severe fire ;on our right flank from the enemy's sharpshooters, keeping the men very close to their works. Three men were severely wounded in --the works during this time. About 4 p. m. of the 13th of August the skirmish line advanced, when nearly all of the enemy's line of skirmishers threw down their arms and surrendered. The regiment skirmishers captured 23 ,men and occupied the enemy's riflepits. The regiment lost 1 man killed and 3 wounded. About 5 p. m. of the 14th of August the rebels made a dash on our skirmish line and were repulsed. The regiment had 2 men wounded. At 8 p. m. on the 26th of August the regiment retired from the line, leaving their skirmishers in charge of Captain Brown, Company C, and marched with the brigade to the right, reaching camp about 1 o'clock next morning. The skirmishers arrived safely during the forenoon; remained here during the day, marching the next morning at daylight, reaching the Atlanta and West Point Railroad near R
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 99 (search)
rds in advance of our former position; the enemy had a cross-fire on us, but the right advancing drove. them from their position; our loss was 2. men killed. 2 officers and 8 men wounded; our pickets and those of the rebels on very amicable terms with one another while encamped on Utoy Creek, which resulted in nearly the whole skirmish line being taken prisoners. August 13, owing to our position on line the prisoners were taken either on our right or left, none on our immediate front. August 14, to avoid a repetition of this the rebels made several demonstrations on our picket-line, but accomplished nothing, their object evidently being to keep their own men from deserting. August 18, right wing of regiment: move to the right and occupy the line held by the regulars of Second Brigade, left wing holding the line vacated by--right wing; Twenty-first Wisconsin and One hundred and fourth Illinois kept-maneuvering to deceive the enemy as to our force; occasional demonstrations made b
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