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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 23-25 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 1 1 Browse Search
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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 16 (search)
ound. Mago then reached Gades on the ships sent back by Hasdrubal. The rest, abandoned by their generals, were scattered, some by desertion, others by flight, among the neighbouring states; no force remained which was notable for its numbers or its strength. So much in general for the manner in which under the command and auspices of Publius Scipio the Carthaginians were driven out of Spain in the fourteenth yearAn error corrected by x. 8 and xxxviii. 12, the 14th year of the war being 205 B.C. from the beginning of the war, the fifthLivy had assigned Scipio's arrival in Spain to the year 211 B.C.; XXVI. xix, 11 ff. Consequently he placed the capture of New Carthage in 210 B.C. See Vol. VII. notes on pp. 68, 230, 296; Scullard, 304 ff. after Publius Scipio received his province and army. Not much later Silanus returned to Scipio at Tarraco, reporting the war at an end.Although his readers would here infer that a campaign has now been completed, the historian goes on to inclu
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 25 (search)
With twenty warships, he said, he and Lucius ScipioHe had been with his older brother in Spain (XXVIII. iii. 2 ff.; iv. 2 ff.; xvii. 1) and in Sicily (above, vii. 2); consul in 190 B.C. with Laelius; XXXVI. xlv. 9. on the right wing would protect the transports; on the left wing the same number of war-ships and Gaius Laelius, admiral of the fleet, with Marcus Porcius Cato, who was at that time quaestor;His quaestorship in this year is attested by Cicero Cat. Mai. 10; Brutus 60; not in 205 B.C., as Nepos Cato i. 3. Plutarch has him return in protest from Sicily to Rome, iii. 7. that war-ships should have one lantern for each ship, transports two for each; that on the flagship the designation at night would be three lanterns. He ordered the pilots toB.C. 204 steer for the Emporia.Trading centres (emporia) along the western shore of the Gulf of Gabès (Syrtis Minor) gave this name to an entire region. It extended southward from Leptis Minor (100 miles from Carthage) and Thapsus
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 29 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 38 (search)
, Publius Villius Tappulus, the last two being made praetors while they were plebeian aediles. The consul after the elections were over returned to the army in Etruria. Priests who died that year and successors appointed in their places were: Tiberius Veturius Philo,B.C. 204 elected and installed flamen of Mars in place of Marcus Aemilius Regillus, who had died in the preceding year;Immediately correcting the opening words of the paragraph. Cf. xi. 14 for Regillus' death in 205 B.C. in succession to Marcus Pomponius Matho, augur and decemvir,Pomponius, probably praetor in 216 B.C., had held two priesthoods concurrently, as did Otacilius in XXVII. vi. 15. were elected Marcus Aurelius Cotta as decemvir, Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus as augur, being a mere youth, which was then a very unusual thing in the assignment of priesthoods. A gilded four-horse chariot was set up in that year on the Capitol by the curule aediles Gaius Livius and Marcus Servilius Geminus.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 1 (search)
which of them Etruria and Liguria;This addition to Etruria as one consul's province (and for the first time) was in view of Mago's activity on the Ligurian coast; cf. § 10; XXIX. v. that the consul to whom the Bruttii should fall was to take over an army from Publius Sempronius; that Publius Sempronius —for he also had his command prolonged for one year as proconsul —should succeed Publius Licinius;The first Crassus to be called Dives; Dio Cass. frag. 57. 52. Before his consulship in 205 B.C. he had been censor in 210; XXVII. vi. 17. that the latter should return to Rome. In war also Licinius was now highly rated, in addition to the other fields in which no citizen was at that time considered more fully equipped, since all the advantages possible to man had been heaped upon him by nature and fortune. Of noble birth he was at the same time wealthy. Conspicuous for a handsome figure and physical strength, he was considered a very eloquent speaker, whether a legal case
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University), chapter 12 (search)
udden agreement of men who curry favour with the victor threw open the gates. And Masinissa, first sending detachments to all the gates and to favourable points on the walls, that no one might have a way of escape open to him, rode at full speed to take possession of the palace. As he was entering the forecourtCrossing the open court Masinissa and his men approach the door. Cf. the vestibulum curiae below, xxi. 4 and (at Carthage) xxiv. 10. Sophoniba,Probably married to Syphax in 205 B.C. Cf. Polybius i. 4; vii. 6; Diodorus Sic. XXVII. 7; Dio Cass. frag. 57. 51 (enlarging on her cultivation in letters and music); Zonaras IX. xi. 1 f.; xiii. 2 ff.; Appian Pun. 27 f. the wife of Syphax, daughter of Hasdrubal the Carthaginian, met him at the very threshold. And when in the midst of the column of armed men sheB.C. 203 caught sight of Masinissa, conspicuous both by his arms and the rest of his dress, thinking it was the king, as was the fact, she clasped his knees and said:
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 1 (search)
ke a state of war existed (XXIV. xl. 1), but in this passage Livy dates the actual hostilities from 211 B.C., when Rome made a treaty with Philip's old enemies, the Aetolians (XXVI. xxiv. 10). Philip's treaty of peace with the Aetolians is dated 205 B.C. by Livy (XXIX. xii. 1), but we may perhaps explain his three years on the assumption that it was not ratified until the next year, Livy's chronology is often confused, as a result of unskilful handling of annalistic sources. The so-called Secondlater the Romans, being at last unoccupied by any war, as a result of the peace with Carthage, and being indignant with Philip both because of the treacherous peace which he had concluded with the AetoliansSee the preceding note for the peace of 205 B.C., which might seem due to the treachery of the Aetolians rather than of Philip. Rome was so occupied by the war against Hannibal that the Aetolians had to bear all the burden of keeping up the war against Philip. The failure of the Romans to aid
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 11 (search)
in the last campaigns of the war. His dominions were enlarged by the peace treaty (XXX. xliv. 12). His friendship with the Scipios and his vigour in extreme old age made him a familiar figure in Latin literature. Their message to the Carthaginians was that their fellow-citizen Hamilcar, left in Gaul —it was not certainly known whether he was from Hasdrubal's earlier army or the later expedition of MagoThe two brothers of Hannibal, Hasdrubal and Mago, had invaded Italy in 207 B.C. and 205 B.C. (XXVII. xxxix. 2 ff.; XXVIII. xlvi. 7 ff.). Cf. x. 2 above. —was making war contrary to the treaty and had raised armies of Gauls and Ligures against the Roman people; if they wanted peace they should recall him and surrender him to the Roman people. At the same time they were ordered to give notice that the Roman deserters had not all been restored to them, but that, according to report, many of them were openly living at Carthage; these were to be sought out and arrested, for
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 29 (search)
is is probably not the same Purpurio who is mentioned in chap. xxi. the lieutenant, arrived, sent by the consul; ambassadors of the Athenians also came to this council. The Macedonians, with whom the latest treatyThe Macedonian alliance in 205 B.C. (XXIX. xii. 2) superseded the treaty with Rome of 211 B.C. (XXVI. xxv. 1). had been made, were first heard. They said that they had nothing new to say since nothing new had happened; inasmuch as, for theB.C. 200 same reasons for which theysons that change from day to day. But my speech shall end just where it began: in this same place you, the same men, decided three yearsProbably the orator minimizes the time for rhetorical effect: the most recent known treaty was that of 205 B.C. (see note to sect. 2). ago on peace with this same Philip, with the disapproval of these same Romans who are now trying to break the peace we pledged and signed. In this situation fortune has made no change; why you should change, I do not see.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 32 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 21 (search)
Cleomedon, sustain the Roman attack which you Macedonians did not resist? Or should we take your word for it that the Romans are not employing in the war greater forces and military power than they did before, or should we rather look at the obvious facts? Then they aided the Aetolians with their fleet; they waged war with neither consular commander nor consular army;In 211 B.C. (XXVI. xxiv. 10) the Romans sent a fleet to the east, but their land forces there were inconsiderable until 205 B.C. (XXIX. xii. 2). A consular army had as its nucleus, normally, two Roman legions; the forces assigned to inferior commanders were largely or wholly made up of Latin allies. at that time the maritime cities of Philip's allies were in fear and terror; the inland districts were so safe from Roman arms that Philip pillaged the Aetolians even while they asked in vain for Roman aid; but now the Romans have finished the Punic War, which they endured for sixteen years in, as it were, the very
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 32 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 33 (search)
opened by him who had asked it, the king that he who was proposing terms of peace, and not he who was receiving them, should speak first; then the Roman began: He said that his speech was simple; for he would say only what was essential if there were to be terms of peace. The king must withdraw his garrisons from all the cities of Greece, must give up the captives and fugitives to the allies of the Roman people, must restore to the Romans the parts of IllyricumAfter the peace of 205 B.C. (XXIX. xii. 1), Philip had occupied certain districts on the Illyrian coast which Rome had taken over after the defeat of the Illyrians in 229 B.C. (Per. XX). which he had occupied subsequent to the peace which had been made in Epirus, and must give back to King Ptolemy of Egypt the cities which he had seized since the death of Ptolemy Philopator. These were his conditions and those of the Roman people; but the king must hear besides the demands of the allies. The ambassador of
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