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Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 1 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 1 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1747 AD or search for 1747 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 49 results in 43 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Filson, John 1747- (search)
Filson, John 1747- Pioneer; born in Chester county, Pa., in 1747; purchased a onethird interest in the site of Cincinnati, which he called Losantiville. While exploring the country in the neighborhood of Losantiville he disappeared and it is supposed was killed by hostile Indians, about 1788. He was the author of The discovery, settlement, and present State of Kentucky; A topographical description of the Western Territory of North America; Diary of a journey from Philadelphia to Vincennes, - Pioneer; born in Chester county, Pa., in 1747; purchased a onethird interest in the site of Cincinnati, which he called Losantiville. While exploring the country in the neighborhood of Losantiville he disappeared and it is supposed was killed by hostile Indians, about 1788. He was the author of The discovery, settlement, and present State of Kentucky; A topographical description of the Western Territory of North America; Diary of a journey from Philadelphia to Vincennes, Ind., in 1785, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gibson, George 1747- (search)
Gibson, George 1747- Military officer; born in Lancaster, Pa., Oct. 10, 1747. On the breaking-out of the Revolution he raised a company of 100 men at Fort Pitt, who were distinguished for their bravery and as sharp-shooters, and were called Gibson's lambs. These did good service throughout the war. A part of the time Gibson was colonel of a Virginia regiment. To obtain a supply of gunpowder, he went down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, with twenty-five picked men and a cargo of flour, ostensibly for trade, and returned with the desired ammunition. In the disastrous battle, Nov. 4, 1791, in which St. Clair was defeated, Colonel Gibson was mortally wounded, dying in Fort Jefferson, O., Dec. 14, 1791. His brother John was also a soldier of the Revolution; born in Lancaster, Pa., May 23, 1730; was in Forbes's expedition against Fort Duquesne, and acted a conspicuous part in Dunmore's war in 1774. He commanded a Continental regiment in the Revolutionary War, his chief command b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gooch, Sir Williams 1681-1751 (search)
Gooch, Sir Williams 1681-1751 Colonial governor; born in Yarmouth, Eng., Oct. 21, 1681; had been an officer under Marlborough, and in 1740 commanded in the unsuccessful attack on Carthagena. In 1746 he was made a brigadier-general and was knighted, and in 1747 a major-general. He ruled with equity in Virginia, and was never complained of. He returned to England in 1749, and died in London, Dec. 17, 1751.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall, David 1714-1772 (search)
Hall, David 1714-1772 Printer; born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1714; emigrated to America in 1747; became a partner of Benjamin Franklin, but the partnership was dissolved in 1766, when the firm of Hall & Sellers was established. This firm ad the printing of the Pennsylvania colonial currency and also the Continental money issued by authority of Congress. He died in Philadelphia, Dec. 24, 1772.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall, Lyman 1725-1790 (search)
Hall, Lyman 1725-1790 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Connecticut in 1725; graduated at Yale College in 1747, and, becoming a physician, established himself at Sunbury, Ga., where he was very successful. He was a member of the Georgia convention in 1774-75, and was influential in causing Georgia to join the other colonies. He was a delegate to Congress in March, 1775, from the parish of St. John, and in July was elected a delegate by the provincial convention of Georgia. He remained in Congress until 1780, when the invasion of the State caused him to hasten home. He was governor of Georgia in 1783, and died in Burke county, Ga., Oct. 19, 1790.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Joncaire, or Jonquiere, Jacques Pierre De Taffanel, Marquis De La 1686-1752 (search)
Joncaire, or Jonquiere, Jacques Pierre De Taffanel, Marquis De La 1686-1752 Naval officer; born in La Jonquiere, France, in 1686; entered the navy in 1698, and in 1703 was adjutant in the French army. He was a brave and skilful officer, and was in many battles. He became captain in the navy in 1736, and accompanied D'Anville in his expedition against Louisburg in 1745. In 1747 he was appointed governor of Canada, but, being captured by the British, he did not arrive until 1749. He died in Quebec, May 17, 1752.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jones, John Paul 1747- (search)
Jones, John Paul 1747- Naval officer; born in Kirkbean, Scotland. July 6, 1747. Before he was eighteen years old he commanded a vessel that traded with the West Indies. Jones came to Virginia in 1773, inheriting the estate of his brother, who died there. Offering his services to Congress, he was made first lieutenant in the navy in December, 1775, when, out of gratitude to General Jones, of North Carolina, he assumed his name. Before that he was John Paul. He was a bold and skilful sea-rover, gathering up many prizes. Made captain in the fall of 1776, he raised the first flag ever displayed on a United States ship-of-war the Alfred. He destroyed the Port Royal (N. S.) fisheries, capturing all the vessels and freight. In the summer of 1777 he sailed in the Ranger to Europe, and in February, 1778, received from a French commander the first salute ever given to the American flag by a foreign man-of-war. In April he scaled the walls of Whitehaven, in England, on the borders
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kalb, Johann, Baron de 1721- (search)
Kalb, Johann, Baron de 1721- Military officer; born in Huttendorf, Bavaria, June 29, 1721; entered the French military service in 1743, and in 1747 rose to the rank of brigadier-general under Marshal Broglie, and obtained the order of military merit in 1761. The next year he visited the English-American colonies as a secret agent of the French government, to ascertain their political temper. He was a brigadier-general in the French army when (November, 1776) he was engaged by Franklin and Deane to serve in the Continental army. He accompanied Lafayette to America in 1777, and was appointed major-general, Sept. 15, 1777, by the Continental Congress. He served under the immediate command of Washington until after the evacuation of Philadelphia, June, 1778; then in New Jersey and Maryland until April, 1780, when he was sent to assist Lincoln, besieged in Charleston. He arrived too late. De Kalb became chief commander in the South after the fall of Baron De Kalb. Charleston, b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kickapoos, (search)
Kickapoos, An Algonquian tribe found by the French missionaries, towards the close of the seventeenth century, on the Wisconsin River. They were great rovers; were closely allied to the Miamis; and in 1712 joined the Foxes in an attack upon Detroit, and in wars long afterwards. They were reduced in 1747 to about eighty warriors, and when the English conquered Canada in 1763 there were about 100 Kickapoos on the Wabash. They joined Pontiac in his conspiracy, but soon made peace; and in 1779 they joined George Rogers Clarke in his expedition against the British in the Northwest. Showing hostility to the Americans, their settlement on the Wabash was desolated in 1791; but they were not absolutely subdued until the treaty at Greenville in 1795, after Wayne's decisive victory, when they ceded a part of their land for a small annuity. In the early part of the nineteenth century the Kickapoos made other cessions of territory; and in 1811 they joined Tecumseh and fought the America
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lauzun, Armand Louis de Goutant, Duc de 1747- (search)
Lauzun, Armand Louis de Goutant, Duc de 1747- Military officer; born in Paris, April 15, 1747; had led an expedition successfully against Senegal and Gambia in 1779, and came to America with Rochambeau in 1780, in command of a force known as Lauzun's Legion, with which he took part in the siege of Yorktown. Returning to France, he became a deputy of the nobles in the States-General, and in 1792 was general-in-chief of the Army of the Rhine. In 1793 he commanded the Army of the Coasts of Rochelle. He did good service for his employers in the French Armand Louis De Goutant Lauzun. Revolution; but when he persistently requested leave to resign his commission the irritated leaders sent him to the scaffold, where he was beheaded, Dec. 31, 1793.
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