hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 5 5 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 5 5 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 4 4 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 4 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 3 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1780 AD or search for 1780 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 257 results in 222 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beatty, John, 1749-1826 (search)
Beatty, John, 1749-1826 Physician; born in Bucks county. Pa., Dec. 19, 1749 was graduated at Princeton in 1769; studied medicine with Dr. Rush; took up arms, and became a colonel in the Pennsylvania line. He was made prisoner at Fort Washington, and suffered much. In 1778 he succeeded Elias Boudinot as commissary-general of prisoners. but resigned in 1780. He was a delegate in the Congress of the Confederation, 1783-85, and of the national Congress. 1793-95. He was secretary of state for New Jersey for ten years--1795--1805. He died at Trenton, N. J., April 30, 1826.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Binney, Horace, 1780-1875 (search)
Binney, Horace, 1780-1875 Lawyer: born in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 4. 1780: was graduated at Harvard College in 1797, and was admitted to the bar in 1800. He practised law with great success until 1830, when his health became impaired and led to his retirement. Soon afterwards he was elected to Congress as a Republican. He declined a renomination. and for many years, devoted himself to writing opinions on legal questions. In 1844, by a masterly argument before the Supreme Court of the United States, on the case of Bidal vs. Girard's executors, he raise the laws governing charities out of the confusion and obseurity which previously existed. He was author of The life and character of justice Bushrod Washington; An inquiry into the formation of Washington's farewell address, and three pamphlets in support if the power claimed by President Lincoln to suspend the writ of Habeas corpus. He died in Philadlelphia. Pa., Aug. 12, 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blackstock's, battle at. (search)
Blackstock's, battle at. In 1780 General Sumter collected a small force near Charlotte.. N. C., and with these returned to South Carolina. (See fishing Creek.) For many weeks he annoyed the British and Tories very much. Cornwallis. who called him the Carolina Gamecock, tried hard to catch him. Tarleton, Wemyss. and others were sent out for the purpose. On the night of Nov. 12 Major Wemyss, at the head of a British detachment, fell upon him near the Broad River, but was repulsed. Eight days afterwards he was encamped at Blackstock's plantation, on the Tyger River, in Union District, where he was joined by some Georgians under Colonels Clarke and Twiggs. There he was attacked by Tarleton, when a severe battle ensued (Nov. 20). The British were repulsed with a loss in killed and wounded of about 300, while the Americans lost only three killed and five wounded. General Sumter was among the latter, and was detained from the field several mouths.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, John, 1732-1800 (search)
Blair, John, 1732-1800 Jurist; born in Williamsburg, Va., in 1732; was educated at the College of William and Mary; studied law at the Temple, London; soon rose to the first rank as a lawyer; was a member of the House of Burgesses as early as 1765, and was one of the dissolved Virginia Assembly who met at the Raleigh Tavern, in the summer of 1774, and drafted the Virginia non-importation agreement. He was one of the committee who, in June, 1776, drew up the plan for the Virginia State government, and in 1777 was elected a judge of the Court of Appeals; then chief-justice, and, in 1780, a judge of the High Court of Chancery. he was one of the framers of the national Constitution; and, in 1789. Washington appointed him a judge of the United States Supreme Court. He resigned his seat on the bench of that court in 1796, and died in Williamsburg, Va., Aug. 31, 1800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bland, Theodoric, 1742-1790 (search)
andolph was his nephew. He received the degree of M. D. at Edinburgh, returned home in 1764, and practised medicine. Bland led volunteers in opposing Governor Dunmore, and published some bitter letters against that officer over the signature of Cassius. He became captain of the 1st Troop of Virginia cavalry, and joined the main Continental army as lieutenant-colonel in 1777. Brave, vigilant, and judicious, he was intrusted with the command of Burgoyne's captive troops at Albemarle Barracks in Virginia; and was member of the Continental Congress in 1780-83. In the legislature and in the convention of his State he opposed the adoption of the national Constitution; but represented Virginia in the first Congress held under it, dying while it was in session. Colonel Bland was a poet as well as a soldier and patriot. The Bland papers, containing many valuable memorials of the Revolution, were edited and published by Charles Campbell in 1840-43. He died in New York City. June 1, 1790.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bomford, George, 1780-1848 (search)
Bomford, George, 1780-1848 Military officer: born in New York, in 1780: graduated at West Point in 1805: introduced bomb cannon after a pattern (of his own, which were called columbiads. These cannon were afterwards developed by John A. Dahlgren (q. v.). He became chief of ord nance May 30, 1832, and from Feb. 1, 1842., till his death was inspector of arsenals, ordnance, arms and munitions of war. He died in Boston, Mass., March 25, 1848. Bomford, George, 1780-1848 Military officer: born in New York, in 1780: graduated at West Point in 1805: introduced bomb cannon after a pattern (of his own, which were called columbiads. These cannon were afterwards developed by John A. Dahlgren (q. v.). He became chief of ord nance May 30, 1832, and from Feb. 1, 1842., till his death was inspector of arsenals, ordnance, arms and munitions of war. He died in Boston, Mass., March 25, 1848.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brevard, Ephraim, 1750- (search)
Brevard, Ephraim, 1750- Physician; born in Charlotte, N. C., about 1750; was graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1768; was educated for a physician, and practised the profession in Charlotte. He was secretary of the famous Mecklenburg Convention. When the British invaded the Carolinas, he entered the Continental army as a surgeon, and was made a prisoner at Charleston in 1780, Broken with disease, he returned to Charlotte after his release, and died about 1783.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brevet, (search)
Brevet, A French word implying a royal act, conferring some privilege or distinction; in England it is applied to a commission giving nominal rank higher than that for which pay is received. Thus, a brevet major serves and draws pay as captain. The first time it was used in the United States army was in 1812, when Capt. Zachary Taylor was promoted to major by brevet for his defence of Fort Harrison. It was sometimes used in the Continental army after the arrival of the French troops in 1780. The word came, into very general use during the Civil War, and, as an intermediate distinction between an actual low and a possible higher rank, is still frequently conferred by the President. Officers receiving it are privileged to include it in their official titles, as Colonel and brevet brigadier-general, U. S. A.. or U. S. V.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, Abraham, 1778-1833 (search)
Buford, Abraham, 1778-1833 Military officer: born in Virginia: became colonel of the 11th Virginia Regiment, May 16, 1778. In May. 1780, when his command, hastening to the relief of Lincoln at Charleston, heard of his surrender, they returned towards North Carolina. Buford's command consisted of nearly 400 Continental infantry, a small detachment of Colonel Washington's cavalry, and two field-pieces. He had reached Camden in safety, and was retreating leisurely towards Charlotte, when Colonel Tarleton, with 700 men, all mounted, sent in pursuit by Cornwallis, overtook Buford upon the Waxhaw Creek. Tarleton had marched 100 miles in fifty-four hours. With only his cavalry — the remainder were mounted infantry — he almost surrounded Buford before that officer was aware of danger, and demanded an instant surrender upon the terms given to the Americans at Charleston. These were too humiliating, and Buford refused compliance. While flags for the conference were passing and repass
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burgoyne, Sir John, 1723-1792 (search)
inburgh both raised a regiment, and several more were enlisted in the Scotch Highlands by the great landholders of that region, to whom the appointment of the officers was conceded. The surrender created despondency among the English Tories, and Lord North, the Prime Minister, was alarmed. Burgoyne returned to England, on his parole, May, 1778. Being blamed, he solicited in vain for a court-martial to try his case, but he ably vindicated himself on the floor of Parliament, and published (1780) a narrative of his campaign in America for the same purpose. He joined the opposition, and an ineffectual attempt was made in 1779 to exclude him from Parliament. Then he resigned all his appointments but in 1782 he was restored to his rank in the army, and appointed privy councillor and commander-in-chief in Ireland. He retired from public life in 1784, and died in London, Aug. 4, 1792. Burgoyne acquired a literary reputation as a dramatist. His plays and poems were published in a coll
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ...