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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 13: General E. V. Sumner and my first reconnoissance (search)
Chapter 13: General E. V. Sumner and my first reconnoissance The first time that General E. V. Sumner's name made any considerable impression upon me was in connection with our new President's quick and secret journey from Harrisburg to Washington just before his first inauguration. There was for the time great excitement on the subject. Mr. Lincoln had left his home in Illinois on February 11, 1861. He experienced nothing harmful-only an ovation all the way. The people at halting places thronged to see him and insisted on speeches from him. He passed from Philadelphia to Harrisburg on February 23d, and addressed the Legislature there assembled. Being weary after his continued receptions, speeches, and excitement, he went to the Jones house and retired to his apartments for needed rest. It was given out publicly that he would not leave Harrisburg till the next morning, but Mr. W. F. Seward, son of William H. Seward, suddenly arrived from Washington and promptly conveyed to
Robert Taylor, appointed, May 8, 1854 Daniel J. Coburn, appointed, Apr. 19, 1856 Josiah L. C. Amee, appointed, Feb. 11, 1861 John Kurtz, appointed, Feb. 17, 1863 Edward H. Savage, appointed, Apr. 4, 1870 Name of the office changed tontendent, Oct. 21, 1878 Captains. Station 1. Edw. H. Savage, appoint'd, May 26, 1854 James B. Weeks, appointed, Feb. 11, 1861 Nathaniel G. Davis, appointed, Apr. 6, 1863 Henry J. V. Myers, appointed, Aug. 3, 1864 Nathaniel Emerson, apEarl and Wm. D. Eaton, July 17, 1852 Hezekiah Earl and Luther A. Ham, May 26, 1854 Edward H. Savage, appointed, Feb. 11, 1861 James Quinn, Apr. 11, 1870 Name changed to Deputy Superintendent, Oct. 21, 1878 Inspectors. John Ballard andn Boston, Feb. 10, 1851 Appointed Captain, Police Division No 1, May 26, 1854 Appointed Deputy Chief of Police, Feb. 11, 1861 Chosen Chief of Police, Apr. 4, 1870 Appointed Probation Officer for Suffolk Co., Oct. 21, 1878 Savannah suf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
cience of the country, other States sent forward their representatives. Then fearing that the friends of reconciliation would be dominant in the congress, this ultra element sought to secure the appointment of delegates from the States not represented, who would combat this sentiment and defeat the accomplishment of any practical results. It was in this spirit that Zachariah Chandler, then a Senator from Michigan, wrote the following letter to the Governor of that State: Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. My dear Governor. Governor Bingham and myself telegraphed you on Saturday, at the request of Massachusetts and New York, to send delegates to the Peace, or Compromise Congress. They admit that we were right, and that they were wrong; that no Republican State should have sent delegates; but they are here and cannot get away. Ohio, Indiana, Rhode Island are caving in, and there is danger of Illinois; and now they beg us for God's sake to come to their rescue and save the Republic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of the history Committee of the Grand Camp C. V., Department of Virginia. (search)
n Magazine, and the whole energy of the radicals was at once enlisted to make it of no effect. Several of the Northern States sent no Commissioners to this Congress at all; others, like Massachusetts, only sent them at the last moment, and then sent only such as were known to be opposed to any compromise or conciliation. The following letter of Senator Chandler, of Michigan, indicates too clearly the feelings of the Republican party at that time to require comment. It is dated February 11th, 1861, a week after the Congress assembled, and addressed to the Governor of his State. He says: Governor Bingham (the other Senator from Michigan) and myself telegraphed to you on Saturday, at the request of Massachusetts and New York, to send delegates to the Peace Compromise Congress. They admit that we were right and they were wrong, that no Republican State should have sent delegates, but they are here and can't get away. Ohio, Indiana and Rhode Island are caving in, and there
For Sale, from 90 to 100 Likely and Valuable Negroes: also, A Tract of Land at Louisa Court-House. By virtue of a decree of the Circuit Court of Louisa county, pronounced in the suits of Timberlake's distributees vs. Timberlake's executors and others, we shall proceed to sell st. Louisa Court-House, on Monday, the 11th day of February, 1861, commencing at 10 o'clock A. M., from 90 to 100 likely Negroes, the property of the estates of Henry, Elizabeth and Polly Timberlake, dec'd, late of Louisa county. The sale will be continued from day to day until completed. We will also sell on the same day, a tract of Land lying in the same county, not far from Thompson's Cross Roads, being the tract on which Miss Elizabeth Timberlake resided at the time of her death. Terms of Sale.--As to the Slaves: On a credit of 6 months, the purchaser giving bonds with good security, bearing interest from the day of sale, with liberty, however, to any purchaser to pay the whole or any part o
For Sale, from 90 to 100 Likely and Valuable Negroes: also, A Tract of Land at Louisa Court-House. By virtue of a decree of the Circuit Court of Louisa county, pronounced in the suits of Timberlake's distributees vs. Timberlake's executors and others, we shall proceed to sell at Louisa Court-House, on Monday, the 11th day of February, 1861, commencing at 10 o'clock A. M., from 90 to 100 likely Negroes, the property of the estate of Henry, Elizabeth and Polly Timberlake, dec'd, late of Louisa county. The sale will be continued from day to day until completed. We will also sell on the same day, a tract of Land lying in the same county, not far from Thompson's Cross Roads, being the tract on which Miss Elizabeth Timberlake resided at the time of her death. Terms of Sale.--As to the Slaves: On a credit of 6 months, the purchasers giving bonds with good security, bearing interest from the day of sale, with liberty, however, to any purchaser to pay the whole or any part of h
For sale, from 90 to 100 likely and valuable Negroes; also, a tract of Land at Louisa Court-House. --By virtue of a decree of the Circuit Court of Louisa county, pronounced in the suits of Timberlake's distributees vs. Timberlake's executors and others, we shall proceed to sell at Louisa Court-House, on Monday, the 11th day of February, 1861, commencing at 10 o'clock, A. M., from 90 to 100 likely Negroes, the property of the estates of Henry, Elizabeth and Polly Timberlake, dec'd, late of Louisa county. The sale will be continued from day to day until completed. We will also sell on the same day, a tract of Land lying in the same county, not far from Thompson's Cross Roads, being the tract on which Miss Elizabeth Timberlake resided at the time of her death. Terms of Sale.--As to the Slaves: On a credit of 6 months, the purchasers giving bonds with good security, hearing interest from the day of said, with liberty, however, to any purchaser to pay the whole or any part
From Washington.[special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. If a man had always about him as much change as the weather in Washington has, he would be mighty comfortable. Two or three days ago, the thermometer was below zero; and now it is moist and warm enough to start the willows to sprouting and the frogs to crosking. The news of the election of Jefferson Davis and Stephens, and the tenor of the dispatch outlining the future course of the Provisional Government of the Southern Confederacy, creates a favorable impression on all sides.--An English gentleman remarked yesterday that the effect would be most happy abroad, for the Foreign Powers have always believed that the Gult States would re-open the African slave trade, repudiate the public debt, and play the rascal generally. The President says that when the ambassadors of the Southern Confederacy come on to demand the forts and arsenals now held by the Federal forces and to account fairly f
hen at Mobile, and he was accordingly ordered to Galveston, to take command of the Henry Dodge, which was without a captain. The precaution was too late. Before Mr. Jones reached Mobile, Captain Morrison, regardless of the obligation of his oath, had surrendered his vessel to the authorities of Alabama. His resignation was subsequently received, but it was not accepted, and the following order was issued, dismissing him from the revenue service: [order.] Treasury Department, Feb. 11, 1861. J. J. Morrison, of Georgia, a Captain in the revenue cutter service of the United States, late in command of the Lewis Cass, having, in violation of his official oath and of his duty to the Government, surrendered his vessel to the State of Alabama, it is hereby directed that his name be stricken from the rolls of said service. By order of the President of the United States. John A. Dix,Secretary of the Treasury. The revenue cutter Robert McClelland, one of the l
ommissioners to the Peace Conference at Washington, and suggesting themselves as proper candidates for the appointment, has already been stated. The Governor it appears has abused the confidence reposed in him by allowing the modest and patriotic correspondence of these gentlemen to be made public.--Both letters appear in the Detroit Free Press; both are to the same effect. That of Senator Chandler being the briefest and most pointed of the two, we publish it below: Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. My Dear Governor --Governor Bingham and myself telegraphed you on Saturday; at the request of Massachusetts and New York, to send delegates to the Peace or Compromise Congress. They admit that we were right, and they wrong; that no Republican State should have sent delegates; but they are here and can't get away. Ohio, Indiana and Rhode Island are caving in, and there is danger of Illinois and now they beg us, for God's sake, to come to their rescue and save the Republican party
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