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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 8, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 1 1 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 1 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 111 (search)
on my men, being severely wounded by shell and bullet. I, however, held the works and retained command for some minutes, until I was taken to the rear in a semi-conscious state. The detachment lost in this battle: Commissioned officers-wounded, 3. Enlisted men-wounded, 30; k illed, 10; missing, 7. Total, 50. A large number of prisoners were also captured by the Eighteenth Regulars in this battle. The casualties in this detachment during the Atlanta campaign, from May 2, 1864, to September 2, 1864, were as follows: Commissioned officers-wounded, 10. Enlisted men-wounded, 166; killed, 38; missing, 17. Total, 231. I should be derelict in my duty did I not most earnestly recommend for brevets the following meritorious and gallant officers for distinguished bravery and conduct on the field of battle, viz: Capt. G. W. Smith, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for good conduct and gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; Capt. R. B. Hull; Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 7th o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 112 (search)
No. 108. reports of Capt. Robert B. Hull, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry. Hdqrs. Detachment Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 17, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit a report of the operations of the detachment Eighteenth Infantry during the Atlanta campaign, from May 2, 1864, to September 2, 1864: At the commencement of the campaign the detachment embraced two battalions, each composed of eight companies, viz, Companies B, D, E F, G, and H, First Battalion, and Companies G and H, Third Battalion (temporarily attached to First Battalion), and all commanded by Capt. George W. Smith; and Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H, Second Battalion, commanded by Capt. W. J. Fetterman. Captain Smith, in connection with his command of the First Battalion, was also detachment commander until relieved by Capt. Lyman M. Kellogg, June 14. He, however, continued to command the First Battalion until July 21, when he was appointed acting assistant adjutant-general
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 114 (search)
ealous compliance with my every order, shown alike in meeting the enemy or in the endurance of privation and fatigue. To this spirit we may ascribe the success which has crowned the efforts of our army. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, James Mooney, Capt., Nineteenth Regt. U. S. Infty., Comdg. First Battalion. Capt. W. J. Fetterman, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 1st Div., 14th Army Corps. Hdqrs. First Battalion, 19TH U. S. Infantry, Camp at Jonesborough, Ga., September 2, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to give, for the information of the brigade commander, a detailed report of the operations of this battalion on the 1st instant: During the march of the brigade to the front from the position occupied by it on the 31st ultimo, and when within one mile of the Macon railroad, the battalion was detailed as a picket to cover the front of the brigade, which was at that time parallel with the line of railroad. Having deployed and reached a point near the r
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 120 (search)
listed men, 37. Missing-commissioned officers, 1; enlisted men, 1. Total, 55. We captured 17 prisoners. A. McMAHAN, Major, Commanding. Lieut. B. P. Dewey, A. D. C. and A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 1st Div., 14th A. C. Hdqrs. Twenty-First Regt. Ohio Infty. Vols., Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. Sir: In obedience to orders, I have the honor to report the operations of the Twenty-first Regiment Ohio Infantry Volunteers, under my command, in the Georgia campaign, to the morning of 2d of September, 1864: The regiment moved, under command of Col. James M. Neibling, from Ringgold, Ga., May 7, and he continued to command it until the morning of May 28, when he was severely wounded, and the command devolved upon myself. Not being present the first sixteen days of the campaign, I cannot mention definitely the operations for that time. The regiment, however, participated in the affair at Buzzard Roost, and, subsequently, in the affair at Resaca. The casualties in this regiment, to
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
No. 134. report of Col. John G. Mitchell, one hundred and thirteenth Ohio Infantry, commanding Second brigade. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 14TH Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., September 4, 1864. Captain: Herewith please find a report of the operations of this command from May 2, 1864, to the occupation of Atlanta, Ga., on the 2d day of September, 1864. The following were the regiments, and their commanding officers, of my brigade: Thirty-fourth Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry, Lieut. Col. Oscar Van Tassell commanding; Seventy-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Col. Carter Van Vleck commanding; Ninetyeighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Col. John S. Pearce commanding; One hundred and eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Col. George T. Limberg commanding; One hundred and twenty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Col. Henry B. Banning commanding; One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Lieut. Col. D. B. Warner commanding. May 2, marched from Rossville to Ringgo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 140 (search)
No. 136. report of Lieut. Col. Maris R. Vernon, Seventy-eighth Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Seventy-Eighth Illinois Vol. Infantry, Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. Captain: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to submit the following report, showing the operations of the Seventy-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in the campaign commencing May 2 and terminating with the battle of Jonesborough, September 1, and the capture of Atlanta, September 2, 1864: The regiment broke camp at Rossville, Ga., on the 2d day of May, with 23 commissioned officers and 516 enlisted men, Col. Carter Van Vleck commanding. The first day's march brought us to Ringgold, where we remained until the morning of the 7th, when, in the advance upon Tunnel Hill, we first struck the enemy, and after a slight skirmish occupied his works. On the 8th the regiment formed a part of the column that carried the first ledge of hills in front of Rocky Face. The accompanying exhibit Nominal list om
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 142 (search)
No. 138. report of Capt. Toland Jones, one hundred and thirteenth Ohio Infantry. headquarters 113TH Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: Herewith please find report of the operations of this regiment from the 2d of May, 1864, to September 2, 1864, the day on which Atlanta was occupied by our forces. The regiment moved from its winter cantonment at Rossville, Ga., May 2, to Ringgold, under command of Lieut. Col. D. B. Warner, in connection with its brigade and division, and went into position in front of Ringgold Gap. From 3d to 7th remained in camp, but changed position to east side of gap. 7th and 8th, marched to Tunnel Hill and Mill Creek Gap, and formed line of battle with Seventy-eighth Illinois on our right, with skirmishers in front, the balance of brigade in rear as supports. We charged and took the isolated hills in front of the gap, losing 1 man killed, and took position on the last hill, covering the mouth of the gap. 9th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
hio Infantry. Hdqrs. 121ST Regt. Ohio Volunteer Infantry, In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. Captain: In obedience to orders I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the One hundred and twentyfirst Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry on the campaign commencing May 2, 1864, from Rossville, Ga., and ending with the battle of Jonesborough, Ga., and capture of the city of Atlanta by our forces, under Major-General Sherman, on the 1st and 2d of September, 1864: This regiment having, in obedience to orders, first sent to the rear all camp and garrison equipage, company books, and cooking utensils, excepting such as line officers, non-commissioned officers, and men carried about their persons, with one pack-mule for regimental headquarters and one for the medical department, moved from Rossville, Ga., on the 2d of May, 1864. We encamped on the afternoon of May 2 near Ringgold, Ga., on the north side of the Chickamauga River. On the 5th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
o an aggregate of 4,840 officers and men. The following table of effective force, made since the close of the campaign, may be profitably compared with that of the 7th of May: Effective force of the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, September 2, 1864. Zzz The division captured during the four months 908 men, including 61 officers. One hundred and forty-seven of these desired to be sent to the rear and classed as deserters, the rest as prisoners of war. It will be seen by this th of any commanders with whom they may hereafter serve. Respectfully submitted. A. Baird, Brigadier-General, Commanding Divisiono Capt. A. C. Mcclurg, Assistant Adjutant-General. Zzz Hdqrs. Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, September 2, 1864. With regard to the affair of yesterday I can only say at present that the Third Brigade made as gallant a charge as ever was made. It relieved one of Carlin's brigades, which was used up, and passed to the front of it. Then it charged
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Battle of Jonesborough. (search)
s to be compared not with the aggregate effective force of 8,460 men with which we entered upon the campaign, but with a much smaller average in the field, as the time of many regiments soon expired, reducing our strength at the end of the campaign to an aggregate of 4,840 officers and men. The following table of effective force, made since the close of the campaign, may be profitably compared with that of the 7th of May: Effective force of the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, September 2, 1864. Zzz The division captured during the four months 908 men, including 61 officers. One hundred and forty-seven of these desired to be sent to the rear and classed as deserters, the rest as prisoners of war. It will be seen by this that while the division has not lost in all 20 prisoners, that it has taken from the rebel army, independent of those killed and wounded, almost as many men as it has lost in battle. Some flags have been captured but not all turned over to me. Of mate
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