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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 6 6 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for March, 1865 AD or search for March, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 57 results in 57 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chamberlain, Joshua Lawrence 1828- (search)
Chamberlain, Joshua Lawrence 1828- Military officer and educator: born in Bangor, Me., Sept. 8, 1828; graduated at Bowdoin College in 1852. He attended a military academy in his boyhood. He was a professor in his alma mater from 1855 to 1862, when he was appointed lieutenantcolonel of a Maine regiment, and rose to brigadier-general of volunteers in the summer of 1864. He was severely wounded in the siege of Petersburg, and again at Quaker Road in March, 1865. In the final operations ending in Lee's surrender he commanded a division of the 5th Corps. General Chamberlain was a most active and efficient officer, and was in twenty-four pitched battles. He was six times wounded—three times severely. He was designated to receive the formal surrender of the weapons and colors of Lee's army, and was brevetted major-general in 1865. He resumed his professional duties in the college in 1865; was governor of Maine in 1866-71; president of Bowdoin College in 1871-83; and afterwards e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clitz, Henry Boynton 1824- (search)
Clitz, Henry Boynton 1824- Military officer; born in Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., July 4, 1824; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1845; served in the Mexican War, and for bravery at Cerro Gordo received the brevet of first lieutenant. During the Civil War he served with distinction; was wounded twice in the battle at Gaines's Mills, and taken prisoner; and after passing a month in Libby prison was exchanged and appointed commandant at West Point; received the brevet of brigadier-general in March, 1865; retired July 1, 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crittenden, Thomas Leonidas 1815- (search)
y., May 15, 1815; studied law with his father, and became commonwealth's attorney in 1842. He served under General Taylor in the war against Mexico, and when the latter became President of the United States he sent Crittenden to Liverpool as United States consul. He returned in 1853, and in September, 1861, was made a brigadier-general and assigned a command under General Buell. For gallantry in the battle of Shiloh he was promoted to major-general of volunteers and assigned a division in the Army of the Tennessee. He afterwards commanded the left wing of the Army of the Ohio under General Buell. Then he served under Rosecrans, taking part in the battles at Stone River and Chickamauga. His corps was among the routed of the army in the last-named battle. He commanded a division of the 9th Corps in the campaign against Richmond in 1864. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army; and in 1881 he was retired. He died on Staten Island, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1893
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davidson, John Wynn, 1824-1881 (search)
Davidson, John Wynn, 1824-1881 Military officer; born in Fairfax county, Va., Aug. 18, 1824; graduated at West Point in 1845, entering the dragoons. Accompanying Kearny to California in 1846, he was in the principal battles of the war with Mexico. He was also active in New Mexico, afterwards, against the Indians. In 1861 he was made major of cavalry, and early in 1862 brigadiergeneral of volunteers, commanding a brigade in the Army of the Potomac. After serving in the campaign on the Peninsula, he was transferred (August, 1862) to the Department of the Mississippi, and cooperated with General Steele in the capture of Little Rock, Ark. He was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865; promoted to lieutenant-colonel, 10th Cavalry, in 1866; was Professor of Military Science in Kansas Agricultural College in 1868-71; promoted to colonel, 2d Cavalry, in 1879. He died in St. Paul, Minn., June 26, 1881.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dinwiddie Court-house, actions at. (search)
Dinwiddie Court-house, actions at. In March, 1865, the National force under General Sheridan crossed the Appomattox River from Bermuda Hundred, passed to the rear of the army before Petersburg, and early on the morning of the 29th marched down the Jerusalem plank-road, and turning westward pushed on by way of Reams's Station to Dinwiddie Courthouse, where he halted for the night at 5 P. 3. Sheridan expected to cut loose from the rest of the army on the 30th to make a raid on the South Side and Danville railroads, but General Grant suddenly changed his plans. General Lee, seeing that his only line of communication might be cut off at any hour, and feeling the necessity of maintaining his extended line of works covering Petersburg and Richmond, concentrated a force of about 15,000 men, and hastened to place them in front of the 5th and 2d Corps of the National army. He then sought to strike a heavy blow on the extreme west of Grant's lines, then held by Sheridan, which he suppos
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Doubleday, Abner, 1819-1893 (search)
5; and served against the Seminole Indians in 1856-58. Captain Doubleday was an efficient officer in Fort Sumter with Major Anderson during the siege. He fired the first gun (April 12, 1861) upon the Confederates from that fort. On May 14 he was promoted to major, and on Feb. 3, 1862, to brigadier-general of volunteers. In Looker's corps, at the battle of Antietam, he commanded a division; and when Reynolds fell at Gettysburg, Doubleday took command of his corps. He had been made major-general in November, 1862, and had been conspicuously engaged in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. He was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general of the United States army in March, 1865; was commissioned colonel of the 35th Infantry in September, 1867; and was retired in December, 1873. He died in Mendham, N. J., Jan. 26, 1893. General Doubleday was author of Reminiscences of forts Sumter and Moultrie in 1860-61; Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and other military works.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Easton, Langdon Cheves, 1814-1884 (search)
Easton, Langdon Cheves, 1814-1884 Military officer; born in St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 10, 1814; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1838; and served in the Florida, Mexican, and Civil wars. In December, 1863, he was appointed chief quartermaster of the Army of the Cumberland; and in May, 1864, was assigned the same post in the army under General Sherman. He received the brevet of major-general in March, 1865; retired in January, 1881. He died in New York City, April 29, 1884.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eaton, John, 1829- (search)
5, 1829; was graduated at Dartmouth College in 1854; applied himself to educational pursuits till 1859, when he entered Andover Theological Seminary, and in 1862, after his ordination, was appointed chaplain of the 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In November of the same year he was made superintendent of freedmen, and later was given supervision of all military posts from Cairo to Natchez and Fort Smith. In October, 1863, he became colonel of the 63d United States Colored Infantry, and in March, 1865, was brevetted brigadier-general. He was editor of the Memphis Post in 1866-67, and State superintendent of public instruction in Tennessee in 1867-69. From 1871 to 1886 he was commissioner of the United States Bureau of Education, and then became president of Marietta College, O., where he remained until 1891; was president of the Sheldon Jackson College of Salt Lake City in 1895-98, when he was appointed inspector of public education in Porto Rico. He is author of History of Thetford
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Emory, William Helmsley, 1811-1887 (search)
t. 9, 1811; graduated at West Point in 1831. He was appointed lieutenant of the topographical engineers July 7, 1833; was aide to General Kearny in California in 1846-47, and was made lieutenant-colonel, Sept. 30, 1847. He was astronomer to the commission to determine the boundary between the United States and Mexico. He was serving as captain of cavalry in Mexico when the Civil War broke out, and brought his command into Kansas in good order. In May, 1861, he was made lieutenant-colonel of the 6th Cavalry; served in the campaign of 1862 in the Army of the Potomac, and was made brigadier-general of volunteers in March of that year. He did good service under Banks in Louisiana, and under Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. He was made colonel of the 5th Cavalry in the fall of 1863; in March, 1865, was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general of the United States army; and in 1876 was retired with the full rank of brigadiergeneral. He died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 1, 1887.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fessenden, William Pitt 1806-1869 (search)
Fessenden, William Pitt 1806-1869 Legislator; born in Boscawen, N. H., Oct. 16, 1806; graduated at Bowdoin College in 1823; admitted to the bar in 1827; member of the Maine legislature two terms; and was elected to Congress in 1841. From Feb. 24, 1854, till his death he was United States Senator, excepting when Secretary of the Treasury from July, 1864, to March, 1865. He was one of the founders of the Republican party in 1856, and throughout the Civil War did eminent service as chairman of the finance committee of the Senate. He died in Portland, Me., Sept. 8, 1869.
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