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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The ram Manassas at the passage of the New Orleans forts. (search)
The ram Manassas at the passage of the New Orleans forts. A. F. Warley, Captain, C. S. N. Entrance to Fort St. Philip. From a photograph taken in 1884.Just after the war I thought bygones had better be bygones and the stirring up of bitter memories was a thing to be avoided; now that so many years have passed, it seems to me almost impossible for one who was observant, and had good opportunities to observe, to tell all he believed he witnessed without in some way reflecting upon one or another of those in position who have gone to their rest and are no longer able to meet criticism. But from the day of the veracious historian Pollard to the present one of Captain Kennon, no mention has been made of the vessel under my command on the night Admiral Farragut passed the Forts, except in slighting, sneering, or untruthful statements. There are only a few of those who were with me left, and I think it due to them and to the memory of those gone that I tell in as few words as I
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
d passed, was also resting-but in profound ignorance. On the 26th he ordered Heintzelman The Stone Bridge, Bull Run, from the North bank. From a sketch made in 1884. to send a regiment from Warrenton to Manassas, to repair the wires and protect the railroad. Aroused, however, on the evening of the 27th, to some appreciat down the Warrenton road toward Gainesville, with directions to picket the roads converging upon the The Union monument near the deep cut. from a sketch made in 1884. (see maps, pp. 473, 509.) turnpike near that place. Stuart had already placed a small cavalry force on this road and north of it, at Hay Market. Johnson, holdion), with servants, camp-equipage, and all the arrangements for cooking and serving food. All the property of the general, The deep cut. from A sketch made in 1884. If this picture were extended a little to the left it would include the Union monument. General Bradley T. Johnson, commanding a brigade in Jackson's old divi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
and bring back such information as he could get. Dwellings in Iuka. From photographs taken in 1884. 1. General George 11. Thomas's headquarters. 2. Female seminary, used as a hospital. 3. Gen. S. V., Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. Fillmore street, Corinth, from a photograph taken in 1884.The battle of Corinth, Miss., which is often confounded in public memory with our advance, under ilroad, looking toward Corinth-remains of Fort Williams on the right. From a photograph taken in 1884. right and attack the enemy on their left flank, reenforced on your right and center. Be careful Rogers, looking toward Corinth from the embankment of Fort Robinett. From a photograph taken in 1884. Whose troops are you? He replied, Cabell's. I said, It was pretty hot fighting here. He a showed my strength to be about 22,000 men. It is estimated that at least 20,000 were brought into action at Corinth. Monument in the National Cemetery, Corinth. From a photograph taken in 1884.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
The battle of Corinth. by William S. Rosecrans, Major-General, U. S. V., Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. Fillmore street, Corinth, from a photograph taken in 1884.The battle of Corinth, Miss., which is often confounded in public memory with our advance, under Halleck, from Pittsburg Landing in April and May, 1862, was foughtn General Davies and swing round your Memphis and Charleston railroad, looking toward Corinth-remains of Fort Williams on the right. From a photograph taken in 1884. right and attack the enemy on their left flank, reenforced on your right and center. Be careful not to get under Davies's guns. Keep your troops well in hand. photograph taken after the battle. Grave of Colonel William P. Rogers, looking toward Corinth from the embankment of Fort Robinett. From a photograph taken in 1884. Whose troops are you? He replied, Cabell's. I said, It was pretty hot fighting here. He answered, Yes, General, you licked us good, but we gave you the bes
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
39th Miss., Col. W. B. Shelby. Brigade loss: k, 21; w, 76; m, 71 = 168. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John S. Bowen: 6th Miss., Col. Robert Lowry; 15th Miss., Col. M. Farrell; 22d Miss., Capt. J. D. Lester; Miss. Battalion, Capt. C. K. Caruthers; 1st Mo., Lieut.-Col. A. C. Riley; La. (Watson) Battery, Capt. A. A. Bursley. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 92; m1, 40 = 160. Cavalry Brigade, Col. W. H. Jackson: 1st Miss., Lieut.-Col. F. A. Montgomery; 7th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. J. G. Stocks. Brigade loss: k, 1. Unattached: La. Zouave Battalion, Maj. St. L. Dupiere. Loss: k, 2; m, 14 = 16. Total Confederate loss (including Hatchie Bridge, Oct. 5th): killed, 505; wounded, 2150; captured or missing, 2183 = 4838. General Van Dorn says ( Official Records, Vol. XVII., Pt. I., p. 378): Field returns at Ripley showed my strength to be about 22,000 men. It is estimated that at least 20,000 were brought into action at Corinth. Monument in the National Cemetery, Corinth. From a photograph taken in 1884.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
at the other end they stretched out to the east until they came well under the fire of Stuart's The sunken road under Marye's Hill. From a photograph taken in 1884. In the background is seen the continuation of Hanover street, which on the left ascends the hill to the Marye Mansion. The little square field lies in the fork made by the former road and the Telegraph road (see map, p. 74). Nearly all that remained in 1884 of the famous stone-wall is seen in the right of the picture. The horses are in the road, which is a continuation of the street south of Hanover street, and on which is the brick house mentioned in General Couch's article. The hou, following the Telegraph road south, there was, at the time of the battle, a long stretch of stone-wall (see map, p. 74), little if any of which was to be seen in 1884, the stone having been used for the gate-house of the National Cemetery. In his official report General Kershaw, who succeeded General Cobb, thus describes the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.20 (search)
's crossing. From a War-time photograph. The hills occupied by Stonewall Jackson's command are seen in the distance. Franklin's battle-field as seen from Hamilton's crossing — Fredericksburg steeples in the distance. From a sketch made in 1884. he pointed out some fine positions for artillery, and said: my reserve artillery has as yet had no chance to show its value, and I am going to make the crossing here and below, under cover of the guns of the reserve artillery. to this I replier, was an impassable stream, separating us, until bridged, from the right wing of the army. In the right front was an open field, traversed by Deep Run from left to right, bounded by the hills and narrowing as it From a photograph taken about 1884. approached a gorge a mile or more away. In front of the left and right at a distance of perhaps half a mile was the ridge of hills occupied by the enemy. the First Corps, under Major-General John F. Reynolds, followed the Sixth, and, forming
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
riss-crossed with an abundance of wild vines. In places all along the south-west and west front the forest appeared impassable, and the skirmishers could only work their way through with extreme difficulty. To the officers of the Eleventh Corps the position was never a desirable one. It presented a flank in the air. We were more than four miles south from Ely's ford, where were Hooker's nearest cavalry flankers. In his report after the battle, General Schurz says: Dowdall's Tavern in 1884. The Wilderness Church (in the left middle-ground) and Hawkins's farm (on the right) as seen from the Plank road in front of Dowdall's Tavern. Our right ought to have been drawn back toward the Rapidan, to rest on that river at or near the mouth of Hunting Run, the corps abandoning so much of the Plank road as to enable it to establish a solid line. Yes; but we were ordered to Dowdall's Tavern, and not to the Rapidan, three or four miles in our rear! And our right was fixed for us
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Stonewall Jackson's last battle. (search)
General Rodes? said Jackson. Yes, sir! said Rodes, impatient for the advance. You can go forward then, said Jackson. A nod from Rodes was order enough for Blackford, and then suddenly the woods rang with the bugle call, and back came the responses from bugles on the right and left, and the long line of skirmishers, through the wild thicket of undergrowth, sprang Stonewall Jackson's old Sorrel. This picture is from a photograph taken at the Maryland State Fair at Hagerstown, in 1884. At that time Old Sorrel was thought to be about thirty-four years old. At the fair, relic-hunters plucked away much of his mane and tail.--editors. eagerly to their work, followed promptly by the quick steps of the line of battle. For a moment all the troops seemed buried in the depths of the gloomy forest, and then suddenly the echoes waked and swept the country for miles, never failing until heard at the headquarters of Hooker at Chancellorsville — the wild rebel yell of the long Confed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
The Vicksburg campaign. personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. Copyright, 1884, by U. S. Grant. by Ulysses S. Grant, General, U. S. A. It is generally regarded as an axiom in war that all great armies moving in an enemy's country should start from a base of supplies, which should be fortified and guarded, and to which the army is to fall back in case of disaster. The first movement looking to Vicksburg and the force defending it as an objective was begun early in November, 1862, and conformed to this axiom. [See map, p. 442.] It followed the line of the Mississippi Central Railroad, with Columbus, Kentucky, as a base, and soon after it started, a cooperating column was moved down the Miissssippi River on transports, with Memphis as its base. Both these movements failing, the entire Army of the Tennessee was transferred to the neighborhood of Vicksburg, and landed on the opposite or western bank of the river at Milliken's Bend. The Mississippi flows through a low alluvial bottom
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